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LST SAILORS TALK DECK
WELCOME TO THE LST SAILORS TALK DECK.
Founded by our own Old Sea Dog

Subject: How to get pain medications without ?


Author:
Dr Steven (*!* Alert)
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Date Posted: 10/22/12 05:33:49

Brand name pain medications without a prescription online, fast delivery, good prices. For more information mail us at: drstevenpe@gmail.com

Buy OxyContin, GHB, Dilaudid, Nubain, Rohypnol, Norco without a prescription online

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Subject: LST 202


Author:
John Gorzycki
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Date Posted: 05/16/12 11:49:27

I am trying to put together information about the LST 202 that my father Stanley served on in WWII. If anyone has any information to share I would appreciate it.
Thank you very much

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Subject: LST121 @ Battle of Leyte Gulf


Author:
Patricia Coakley (Anxious , and sad)
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Date Posted: 10/ 7/12 07:40:39

My dad, William J. Ferguson was killed that day. Does anyone remember him? My mom was never able to speak of him again.I am desperate to know anything about him. I was told he was a really special person. Please help if you can. Thanks.

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Subject: LST 480


Author:
Ron Armstrong
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Date Posted: 02/10/12 07:13:52

Just found your wonderful site. My father Harold W. Armstrong
was a injured survivor of LST 480 that fateful day at West Loch. He never spoke of that day much, the memories to horrible to mention. He passed away in 1986. Recently in my research of West Loch I have seen mentions of a documentary aired on the History Channel. If anyone knows where I can get a copy it would be deeply appreciated. Also any info you might have on LST 480 or its officers and crew I would love to hear from them. To Close thanks again for your efforts and all those involved in this site. Keep the memories alive.

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Subject: navy ship pc 587


Author:
barbara blankenship (what happened to it)
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Date Posted: 04/30/12 00:31:02

I KNOW THERE WAS A SHIP PC 587 WHAT HAPPENED TO IT

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Subject: Re: LST 158


Author:
Dan Giorgio
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Date Posted: 04/28/12 01:58:52

My father, Daniel Giorgio, was a radioman on LST 158 when it was attacked. He suffered shrapnel wounds. After doing much research on his service and the ship's history, this photo summarizes such. It also serves as a memorial to those who served and sacrificed on LST 158.

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Subject: ship location


Author:
barbara blankenship
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Date Posted: 04/13/12 00:23:34

what happened to the ship pc 587 please help

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Subject: The WWII Bombers


Author:
Rusty Old Sea Dog
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Date Posted: 03/ 7/11 15:53:30

Have you ever wondered what happened to all those WWII bombers ?, I have. I can now show you where thousands of them are. They are in "The Boneyard" in Arizona, sitting there waiting for whatever.


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Subject: Korean War Vet


Author:
Buddy LST 1126 (Info)
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Date Posted: 03/26/12 02:06:00

After 60 years, fallen Korean War veteran is finally laid to rest
March 23, 2012|Staff report
U.S. Army Cpl. Chester Roper was finally laid to rest today, 60 years after the young man died in the Korean War as a prisoner of war.
But without hearing anything about the whereabouts of the 20-year-old or even if the man was dead or alive, the family could not find closure and could never arrange for a funeral.
That changed in December when a Department of Defense special unit assigned to attach names to U.S. troops killed in past conflicts confirmed that unidentified remains held in Hawaii were those of Roper, who died in North Korea. They used dental records and an old X-ray of Roper's clavicle to make the identification.
Today, the fallen soldier was finally laid to rest near his family at Evergreen Cemetery in Evergreen Park surrounded by generations of relatives, some whom had never met the man but had learned about him through family stories.
A military honor guard stood at attention as a bugler played taps and Roper's relatives wiped away tears and received the folded American flag that rested on the brown wooden coffin.
His grave marker will be inscribed with his name and the message "Welcome home."

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Subject: Re: LST 512


Author:
John King jr (happy)
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Date Posted: 01/10/11 10:19:54

My father was a radio man on LST 512. His name was John King anybody remember him? Please email me at skidog777@roadrunner.com

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Subject: LST 910


Author:
Tony Selletti (Loyal)
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Date Posted: 03/11/12 11:58:06

Anyone have any photos, or other info, of LST 910 ?

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Subject: LST 671


Author:
Bud ore
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Date Posted: 03/ 5/11 23:49:58

I am looking for anyone that served on LST 671 during WW II
My father was radioman 2nd during its tour from Leyte to Okinawa. I am trying to compile some memoirs to pass to his grandchildren.

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Subject: Are You A Shellback ?


Author:
OSD
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Date Posted: 10/29/09 14:32:58



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Subject: Information requests


Author:
Buddy LST 1126
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Date Posted: 02/ 9/12 00:58:07

When you post a message asking for information or help in locating information it would be courteous if you would at the least acknowledge that you tried the suggestion. It would also be good if you updated the website message to report on how you did with the information.

I try to give help on each post if I have any or can find it, and it would be good to know if it helped someone.

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Subject: HELP


Author:
Charle e. Hilll
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Date Posted: 02/ 3/12 03:16:00

LCI533/729 NEED INFO WW11 CREW

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  • Re: HELP -- Buddy LST 1126, 02/ 7/12 00:45:15

Subject: LST 507 Operation Tiger


Author:
Kathleen Price Fradella (hopeful)
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Date Posted: 01/22/12 09:50:22

I'm looking for anyone who served with my father Clyde B. Price from New Orleans Louisiana. He was on board LST 507 in the early hours of 28th April 1944. I think he served with the 557th Qm Rhd Co. and I also believe that he went on to Utah Beach. He died 34 years ago and took all his secrets with him. Any information or photos would be a Blessing.
thank you,
Kathleen Price Fradella

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Subject: USS Gallatin APA 169


Author:
Ron Magno
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Date Posted: 12/ 6/11 17:08:14

Looking for any info./pictures of my dad (Tom Magno)or his crew mates. He served aboard the USS Gallatin APA 169 from 1942-1945. Thank you

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Subject: 112th Army-Navy Game


Author:
Paul (Sullenberger)
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Date Posted: 12/ 9/11 14:08:37

The 112th Army-Navy game will be played Saturday Dec 10 at 2:00 Eastern on CBS network.
Navy enjoys a 9-game win streak and leads the series 55-49-7
The game will be played at FedEx Field in Landover, MD., the first time that the teams have met in our Nation's capital.
GO NAVY! BEAT ARMY!

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Subject: Picture of LST 123


Author:
John Kyle
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Date Posted: 11/15/11 02:19:43

My father, John G. "Jack" Kyle wae on Lst 123 during WW2. I would like to find a good picture of LST 123. Any help appreciated. Thank you.

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Subject: Anthony Drexel Duke


Author:
John Hellman
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Date Posted: 06/26/08 04:37:04

My dad was on LST-530 during WWII......European and Pacific Theater. His commanding officer......Anthony Drexel Duke wrote his autobiography a year or so ago titled "Uncharted Course". It details his life growing up with a heritage of three famous American families.....Drexels, Biddles and Dukes. It also describes his time as commander of my Dad's ship during their landings at Normandy and the islands of the Pacific. He comes into contact with lots of famous folks during his life. He's around 90 years old now and has devoted a good deal of his life and good fortune to giving back to disadvantaged youth.

Just wanted to share this with the group. It may be old news as I don't check this board that often.

It's a good read and especially for me as my Dad rarely spoke about WWII.

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Subject: Re: does anyone have a photo of the uss lst 269?


Author:
Warren Dickerson
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Date Posted: 11/14/11 07:59:02

My father was on the commissioning crew. (Motor Mac) I would like to speak to you.

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Subject: LST-454


Author:
WILLIAM SCOGGINS (HELLO)
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Date Posted: 06/18/11 22:33:37

I was wondering if there was anyone out there that served onboard the 454 during the Leyte invasion.
My dad served on her i think from late 43 to 45.
I Would like to ask some questions about the ship for a memorial display im making for him.
He passed away in 2005 from cancer.
I talked with him in the past about being on the LST'S, but it was years ago.
Thanks for any help.

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Subject: Re: LST 166 DATA + PICTURES


Author:
Aaron Knife Has LST 166 stampped on hilt (Excited)
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Date Posted: 09/25/11 02:19:50

Need info on specific person. W J H .. I have a knife that may have been an award from the men. Its dipped in chrome and has this boats number, initials, date of 7-21-43, and a service number stammped into it. Im sure its a one of a kind. But I want to know who built it and why.. Any clues would help... Thanks.. AA

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Subject: LST 530


Author:
John Hellman
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Date Posted: 01/21/11 05:20:33

I love that you have a photo of my Dad's LST 530 at the top of the web page. I believe that photo was of the three LST docked in Hawaii. I'd love t figure out how to share all the photos from his ship's book which I have.

John

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Subject: Re: LST 694


Author:
EDWARD FOX, JR
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Date Posted: 12/ 5/10 13:37:58

Buddy:
Thank you for the information about hull number. I have since registered my father and will be trying to contact some of his ship mates. I have several photographs of my father and some of his shipmates that I would like to share if they contact me or if I can locate them. Also, while searching for information regarding my father's activities in WWII, I have found actual photographs of his LST at reasonable prices on e-bay.
Thanks again for responding to my question. If anyone has any additional information on LST 694, I would truly appreciate an e-mail or a call at 770-634-3829.

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Subject: Tulagi... 69 years ago today


Author:
SeaBat
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Date Posted: 08/ 7/11 07:44:50

Today in Military History from the Strategy website...

1942 Tulagi: 1st Marine Div captures the island against fierce resistance

"Though the landings on Guadalcanal took the great majority of the ships and Marines of the Operation "Watchtower" invasion force, the assault on the small Japanese-held islands to the north produced by far the heaviest fighting. Tulagi, site of the British Solomon Islands' pre-war government center, and the nearby Tanambogo-Gavutu seaplane base were garrisoned by tough Japanese Special Naval Landing Force troops. Tulagi, about two miles long and several hundred yards wide, held about five hundred of the enemy. U.S. Marines came ashore at 8AM on the island's undefended southwestern shore. Forming a battle line across the island, they then drove eastward toward the entrenched Japanese, who were bombarded by light cruiser San Juan, destroyers Buchanan and Monssen, plus planes from the aircraft carriers.

By the end of August 7th, the greatly-outnumbered enemy had been driven into a Tulagi's southeastern corner. Following a night of intense counterattacks, and the next day's addition of reinforcements from the Guadalcanal side of the operation, the Marines seized the rest of the island, though it took some days to eliminate the last of the defenders. This battle took the lives of about 45 Marines, while only a few of Tulagi's Japanese survived.

In the months after its capture, Tulagi was developed as a minor Naval facility. The sheltered waters near the island provided a relatively safe haven where battle-damaged warships could receive first-aid and others could be resupplied. Short-ranged motor torpedo boats, which proved themselves important during both the Guadalcanal fighting and the Central Solomons Campaign that followed in 1943, were based there, while numerous other combat support and recreational facilities ultimately were established on or close to Tulagi."

From Naval Historical Center

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Subject: AGENT ORANGE UPDATE


Author:
Buddy LST 1126
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Date Posted: 08/ 5/11 05:05:07

Check out this website about the new rules on Agent Orange. Even "Blue Water Navy" personnel may be eligible for benefits.

http://www.publichealth.va.gov/exposures/agentorange/

Agent Orange

Information about Agent Orange, possible health-related problems and VA benefits Announcements

Diabetes and Agent Orange exposure: Did you know that Vietnam-era Veterans with type 2 diabetes mellitus may be eligible for VA disability compensation based on their exposure to herbicides? Find out about type 2 diabetes mellitus and Agent Orange.
Blue Water Veterans: These Veterans who served on open sea ships but did not set foot in Vietnam and have an Agent Orange-related disease may still apply for VA disability compensation if they believe they were exposed. Find out more about Blue Water Veterans and VA benefits.

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Subject: LSTs LOST IN WWII


Author:
OLD SEA DOG
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Date Posted: 01/18/10 10:39:05

LST'S LOST IN WWII
.......................................
*LST 6 -- 17 Nov 1944, Mined and sunk in the Seine Bay, France.
*LST 43 -- 21 May 1944, Sunk at West Loch, Pearl Harbor when mortar ammunition that was being loaded aboard LST 353 exploded.
Raised but not repaired.
*LST 69 -- 21 May 1944, Sunk at West Loch, Pearl Harbor when mortar ammunition that was being loaded aboard LST 353 exploded.
*LST 158 -- 11 Jul 1943, Heavily damaged by German aircraft of Licata, Sicily, Italy in position 37º05'N, 13º55'E. Abandoned and sunk.
*LST 179 -- 21 May 1944, Sunk at West Loch, Pearl Harbor when mortar ammunition that was being loaded aboard LST 353 exploded.
*LST 203 -- 1 Oct 1943, Damaged by grounding near Nanumea, Ellice Islands (now called Tuvalu) and declared a total loss.
*LST 228 -- 19 Jan 1944, Grounded off the Azores in position 38º39'N, 27º12'W.
Deemed beyond salvage.
*LST 282 -- 15 Aug 1944, LST 282 was heavly damaged by a German glider bomb while taking part in the landings on the coast of southern France. LST 282 was beached and abandoned in position 43º25'N, 06º50'E.
*LST 313 -- 10 Jul 1943 , Bombed by German aircraft off Gela, Sicily in position 37º01'N, 14º15'E. Destroyed by fire.
*LST 314 -- 9 Jun 1944, Torpedoed and sunk in the Seine Bay about 30 nautical miles east of Cherbourg, France in position 49º43'N, 00º52'W during an attack by the German motor torpedo boats S 172, S 174, S 175 and S 187.
*LST 318 -- 10 Aug 1943, On 9 August 1943 USS LST 318 was damaged by enemy dive bomber off the north coast of Sicily in position 38º04'N, 14º30'E. The ship was beached and abandoned the next day.
*LST 333 -- 6 Jul 1943, At 21.31 hours on 22 June 1943 the German submarine U-593 fired a spread of four torpedoes at the convoy Elastic about eight nautical miles north-east of Cape Corbelin, Algeria in position 36º59'N, 04º01'E and hit USS LST 333 and USS LST 387 with one torpedo each. The first was beached and declared a total loss, while the latter was towed to Dellys and later repaired. The torpedoeing of these two ships hampers the training for the forthcoming invasion of Sicily (Operation Husky).

USS LST 333 was struck by the torpedo on the starboard side in the stern. The explosion demolished the stern section, carried away the screws and rudder and stopped the engines. About 20 minutes after the hit, the landing crafts USS LCT 244 and USS LCT 19 took the landing ship in tow and proceeded slowly towards the beach. After one hour, the submarine chaser USS SC 503 came alongside and took off 32 injured crew members and 24 injured passengers and brought them to Algiers. After five hours of towing, the stern of the landing craft came aground near Dellys. The crew and passengers were taken off by the landing craft and brought to Dellys. USS LST 333 later sank during a salvage attempt on 6 July.
*LST 342 -- 18 Jul 1943, Torpedoed and sunk on 18 July 1943 by the Japanese submarine RO-106 south-east of New Georgia, Solomon Islands in position 09º03'S, 158º11'E.
...........................................................................................................................
MORE IN NEXT LIST

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Subject: LST 512


Author:
Paul Sullenberger
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Date Posted: 07/24/11 00:12:33

http://www.brooklineconnection.com/history/Facts/LST512.html
Link to Brooklyne, PA local history item about the LST 512

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Subject: LST 512


Author:
Paul Sullenberger
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Date Posted: 07/24/11 08:47:49

Photobucket
A view of the LST 512 moored on the Monongahela River in Pittsburgh, with a line of visitors waiting to go aboard. Over 50,000 people visited the 512 while it was there. On arrival in Pittsburgh, my father was separated from the ship and traveled back to St. Louis, MO, for discharge, having served 3 years, 9 months, 13 days.

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Subject: LST 512


Author:
Paul Sullenberger
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Date Posted: 07/24/11 08:44:14

Photobucket
A view of the main deck of the LST 512 while at Pittsburgh, October, 1945. It shows some of the static display items and machinery used for the amphibious assault demonstrations. Starboard side was mainly US, port side was captured Japanese armament

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Subject: Header Photo


Author:
SeaBat
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Date Posted: 07/10/11 12:46:39

The header photo is from the National Archives...

LST 4 at Sicily. Great shot of the small boats being lowered...

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Subject: An Anniversary... do you remember?


Author:
SeaBat
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Date Posted: 07/10/11 12:42:08

"On the night of 9-10 July 1943, an Allied armada of 2,590 vessels launched one of the largest combined operations of World War II� the invasion of Sicily. Over the next thirty-eight days, half a million Allied soldiers, sailors, and airmen grappled with their German and Italian counterparts for control of this rocky outwork of Hitler's "Fortress Europe." When the struggle was over, Sicily became the first piece of the Axis homeland to fall to Allied forces during World War II. More important, it served as both a base for the invasion of Italy and as a training ground for many of the officers and enlisted men who eleven months later landed on the beaches of Normandy."

From army.military website

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Subject: Scumbag Pharmacies


Author:
Buddy LST 1126
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Date Posted: 07/ 1/11 08:53:28

Scumbag Pharmacies sure do know how to mess up a good website.

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Subject: TO Buddy LST 1126 REF: LST-454


Author:
WILLIAM SCOGGINS (THANK YOU)
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Date Posted: 06/20/11 05:54:51

THANK YOU FOR THE HELP. I WILL GIVE MR BEAM A CALL.

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Subject: Re: LST-454


Author:
WILLIAM SCOGGINS (THANK YOU Buddy LST1126)
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Date Posted: 06/20/11 05:49:59

THANK YOU FOR THE HELP I'LL GIVE MR BEAM A CALL.

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Subject: Re: LST 241 photo at Roi


Author:
Mark Payne
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Date Posted: 05/30/11 10:55:21

My dad Donald Lewis Payne was on this ship. Does anyone want to talk to me about this if they remember him? He passed away in 1999 and his ashes are what he called "in a nitch in the wall" at Fort Rosecrans. He never spoke much about the war.

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Subject: Older Posts coming up at the start


Author:
old sea dog
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Date Posted: 12/31/09 16:45:35

Some older posts are showing up at the head of the posts, I do not understand what is going on. It's almost like someone is pulling up posts from the archives. Anyone have any ideas ?.
old sea dog

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Subject: USS LST 125 & 777


Author:
Bill Johnson
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Date Posted: 01/10/09 06:11:34

My father was on both of these LST's. Looking for any information.

John A. Johnson
Ship Fitter 1c Discharge date 6/46
Pacific Theater - 4 stars
Philippine Liberation Ribbon - 2 stars


I remember him telling a story about a kid from Georgia, Roy Leroy Pomaroy, never forget that name, couldn’t stomach Navy chow. He liked Peaches, so the old man told them to feed him canned peaches.

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Subject: Re: Looking for Shipmates


Author:
Lou Piper
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Date Posted: 05/13/11 08:24:11

My father served on LST168 ...a pretty long time..he is dead now...but I wonder about his shipmates.

Vr

Lou

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Subject: Happy Easter!


Author:
SeaBat
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Date Posted: 04/24/11 02:54:23

Happy Easter to everyone! May the blessings of this day, over 2000 years ago, be present in your life each and every day. A gift unsurpassed, given out of love.

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Subject: The Old Sea Dog going into Drydock


Author:
The Old Sea Dog
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Date Posted: 04/ 2/11 17:41:53

The Old Sea Dog will be going into dry dock for repairs. The old hull needs to be cleaned and cleared. I will be away for 6 to 8 weeks and may not be in contact until the work is done. Never fear The Hard Headed Sea Dog will return in much better shape !!.

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Subject: wYnExrlnwdHak


Author:
JohnBush (AoujDcerlTP)
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Date Posted: 04/21/11 08:35:23

Hello! Very good job(this site)! Thank you man.

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Subject: pCqBfJkjgLOniQcr


Author:
paroxetine (nvPVkjbCoFwWvMdYw)
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Date Posted: 04/20/11 11:30:14

love to read, buy Varenicline, 882082,

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Subject: LST 1005


Author:
RUSTY OLD SEA DOG
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Date Posted: 02/24/11 09:04:59

LST 1005
..................
# LST-542 Class Tank Landing Ship: Laid down, 2 February 1944, at Bethlehem Steel Co., Quincy, MA.
# Launched, 11 March 1944
# Commissioned USS LST-1005, 6 April 1944
# Following World War II USS LST-1005 performed occupation duty in the Far East until early 1946.
# Severely damaged by collision with USS LST-814 during a beaching operation off Sasebo, Japan, 30 December 1945
# Decommissioned, 6 April 1946 after removal of all salvageable equipment following damage sustained in beaching operations
# Struck from the Naval Register, 17 April 1946
# Final Disposition, hulk destroyed

Ex-USS LST-814 and ex-USS LST-1005 beached at Okunoshima, Japan, 3 August 1946. The two LSTs had been damaged beyond economical repair and had been decommissioned, struck from the Naval Register and stripped of all useful material. They were then loaded with a cargo of poison gas, removed during "Operation Lewisite" from the Tokyo 2nd Arsenal, prior to being towed to the Philippines Sea for scuttling on 12 August 1946.


Ex-USS LST-814 and ex-USS LST-1005 beached at Okunoshima, Japan, 3 August 1946. The hulk of ex-LST-814, with a tug alongside, was ready to be towed to the Philippines Sea for disposal. Her cargo consisted of 85 tons of liquid Viesicant, 665 tons of Mustard bombs, 710 tons of Dyphenylcynarsine and 540 tons of Mustard and Lewisite gas containers. Making 2000 metric tons in all. Ship and cargo were sunk, 12 August 1946, by blowing holes in her hull with ten Beehive charges.

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Subject: LST 158


Author:
Paul Sullenberger
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Date Posted: 03/31/11 13:28:54

Photobucket
LST 158 and another unidentified LST being loaded at Bizerte, Tunisia July 1943 in preparation for the invasion of Sicily. LST 158 would be sunk on July 11, 1943 off Licata.

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Subject: Carolinas LST Reunion


Author:
Buddy LST 1126 (:-))
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Date Posted: 03/24/11 01:40:37

The annual Carolinas LST Association "Beach Bash" is set for May 2,3,4, 2011 and should be another great reunion. Live show, good restaurants, plentiful Hospitality room snacks, Sea Stories galore, live Auction, and plenty of old friends meeting again along with all of the new members.

Memberships ($15.00) available for honorably discharged veterans or those now serving. You need not live in the Carolinas. We have members from Florida to California.

Reunion openings available for non-members and non-member groups such as individual ship organizations. For information, contact me: Buddy@LST1126.com and I'll send you full information.

Y'all come!!

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Subject: Re: taking out the garbage


Author:
Buddy LST 1126 (:-()
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Date Posted: 03/13/11 00:04:02

Old Sea Dog it is nearly impossible to block those bastards. They continue to change their names and addresses so much.

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Subject: liDydydJWzBBeiS


Author:
Pensjonat Korbielow (OiiFimAold)
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Date Posted: 03/12/11 05:55:19

hate the captcha, Audit Techniques Guide, 163,

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Subject: yBTbKJcbDScPm


Author:
tede glam rap (SPNRHlUzZFwlVv)
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Date Posted: 03/10/11 14:17:12

w0w this is good, tede diss, oxi,

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Subject: D-Day


Author:
Paul Sullenberger
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Date Posted: 12/17/09 04:08:04

Does anyone have access to, or know where to find, the 1969, CBS News (at least, I'm pretty sure it was CBS) special on the 25th Anniversary of the D-Day invasion? It included (as I recall) Walter Cronkite walking with Pres. Eisenhower, through the cemetery at Colleville Sur Mer. It had a lot of original footage of the invasion. My mother and I were watching it and it clearly showed the LST 492 - which prompted yells of "there it is" from my mother - however I haven't been able to locate it since.

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Subject: LST 1005


Author:
Randall Smith
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Date Posted: 02/24/11 05:11:33

I am looking for photos or stories of LST 1005.

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Subject: LST 512 - 2 more views and information


Author:
Paul Sullenberger
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Date Posted: 11/ 2/10 12:02:24

Photobucket
Photobucket
Photobucket
Photobucket

Two more views of the USS LST 512, as it arrives in Chicago, 21 May 1945, along with the information printed on the back side of the photos. One of my previous posts about the 512 was also dated May 1945, and I thought that the location was possibly New Orleans, as it was in NO on VE Day, 8 May 1945. One of these is dated 21 May, 1945, the other only says 5-45. The area appears similar to the previous photo, and the tugboat appears to be the same as well.
The 512 spent about 2 weeks in Chicago preparing for the opening of the exhibition tour, which officially began in Detroit in June 1945

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Subject: The Anniversary of the Battle of Iwo Jima


Author:
SeaBat
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Date Posted: 02/21/11 05:26:56

Since the battle to take Iwo Jima began this month in 1945, I wanted to pay tribute to all of those who were there.

If you haven't seen the movie or read the book "Flags of Our Fathers" it truly does give a good idea of what our men encountered on that volcanic rock. NO ONE can fully understand who wasn't there... but those of you who served have a better understanding than I.

Thank you all... you endured hell here on earth to keep us free. There is no way to repay all you have done for us.


In the header photo (from the National Archives), note the LSTs unloading on the beach in the right side of the photograph.

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Subject: LST 480


Author:
Rusty Old Sea Dog
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Date Posted: 02/13/11 15:16:49


USS LST-480 burned out and grounded on Intrepid Point, West Loch, on 22 May 1944. Note the especially extensive damage to the LST's after part and to her starboard bow area. A pontoon causeway is floating along LST-480's starboard side, and the Coast Guard Cutter Woodbine (WAGL-289) is nosed in at her stern.
Date : 21 May 1944

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Subject: The Ghosts of Cape Horn


Author:
The Rusty Old Sea Dog
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Date Posted: 02/11/11 14:57:24

THIS SONG IS FOR ALL THE RUSTY OLD SEA DOGS. From the days of tall ships and sailing round the horn.



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Subject: U-2 SPY PLANES


Author:
OLD SEA DOG
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Date Posted: 02/ 2/11 17:41:15


THIS IS A U-2 SPY PLANE. YOU THOUGHT THEY WERE LONG GONE, NOT SO. I CAN SEE THEM COASTING TO A LANDING AT BEALE AFB 70 MILES NORTH OF HERE. THEY COME IN LOW AND SLOW TO LAND. YOU CANNOT MISTAKE A U-2 FOR ANY OTHER PLANE.

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Subject: General Douglas MacArthur going ashore Lingayen


Author:
Clark E. Parks
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Date Posted: 01/25/11 10:19:33

Photobucket

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Subject: General Douglas MacArthur going ashore Lingayen


Author:
Clark E. Parks
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Date Posted: 01/25/11 10:16:55

Photobucket

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Subject: General Douglas MacArthur going ashore Lingayen


Author:
Clark E. Parks
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Date Posted: 01/25/11 10:14:10

Photobucket

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Subject: General Dougles MacArthur going ashore Lingayen


Author:
Clark E. Parks
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Date Posted: 01/25/11 10:06:14

Photobucket

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Subject: General Dougles MacArthur going ashore Lingayen


Author:
Clark E. Parks
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Date Posted: 01/25/11 10:02:58

Photobucket

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Subject: General Douglas MacArthur going ashore Lingayen


Author:
Clark E. Parks
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Date Posted: 01/25/11 09:55:22

Photobucket

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Subject: General Douglas MacArthur going ashore Lingayen


Author:
Clark E. Parks
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Date Posted: 01/25/11 09:49:12

Photobucket

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Subject: General Douglas MacArthur going shore Lingayen


Author:
Clark E. Parks
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Date Posted: 01/25/11 09:45:53

Photobucket

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Subject: General Douglas MacArthur going ashore Lingayen


Author:
Clark E. Parks
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Date Posted: 01/25/11 09:42:26

Photobucket

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Subject: General Dougles MacArthur going ashore Lingayen


Author:
Clark E. Parks
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Date Posted: 01/25/11 07:17:18

www.usslst740.com

Photobucket

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Subject: General Dougles MacArthur going shore Lingayen


Author:
Clark E. Parks
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Date Posted: 01/23/11 09:46:12

http://s1233.photobucket.com/albums/ff386/Bethany4249/

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Subject: CQ CQ CQ


Author:
SeaBat
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Date Posted: 01/22/11 11:02:02

OSD... please send me your Ham call sign.. I will be able to contact you in the very near future.. I PASSED MY TECHNICIAN'S TEST TODAY!!!!

88's....

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Subject: OSD.... Just remember...


Author:
SeaBat
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Date Posted: 01/22/11 10:46:02

I think there is a limitation on where you can fly that thing!!!! lol..

ENJOY!!!

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Subject: I'm now on my new computer


Author:
The Old Sea Dog
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Date Posted: 01/14/11 15:52:10

Well, it's hooked up and running, my newer, faster connection, better computer. How does 100 MBPS sound ?.

The Old Sea Dog

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Subject: Re: Ship's log. Visiting LST's today


Author:
John Hellman
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Date Posted: 01/ 3/11 01:25:56

Thanks. I'll try LST 325 as I live in Atlanta. I've sent in the request for the deck logs. Am sure it will take awhile but can't wait to read the happenings on the ship prior to the Dday landing. I've been fortunate to be able to communicate with my Dad's commanding office .....Anthony Drexel Duke who commanded LST 530. He's alive and well .....in his 90's living in New York.

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Subject: Ship's log


Author:
John Hellman
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Date Posted: 12/29/10 05:24:14

I know this has been asked and answered before......probably many times........but my Dad was stationed on LST 530 during the war. I'd like to obtain the ship logs for the time period around the Dday landings. I know you can request them and that there's a fee but didn't know the specifics. Thanks for any help.

I hope to one day get to Evansville to see the LST 325. It would be great to see the type of ship my Dad served on during the war. You all do a great job. Thanks
John Hellman

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Subject: The 125


Author:
OSD
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Date Posted: 12/27/10 12:01:51




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Subject: LST 708


Author:
OSD
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Date Posted: 12/25/10 16:31:44

An impressive list of action the LST 708 saw
Initiation April 20, [19]44

April 21 – May 26 Boats
26 May – 6 June Home
6 June – 8 June OGU [Out Going Unit]
9 June – 21 June [Camp] Bradford [Norfolk, Virginia]
21 June – 26 June [Camp] Shelton [Norfolk, Virginia]
27 June – 2 July Chicago
2 July – 9 July Great Lakes [Naval Training Station]
10 July - Jeffersonville [Indiana]
[17 July 1944 USS LST-708 Commissioned]
17 July – 17 August New Orleans [Naval Support Activity]
23 August – 26 August Cuba
29 August – 1 September Panama
14 September – 19 September Deago [sic. – San Diego]
29 September – 14 October Pearl Harbor
31 October – 2 November Guam [Mariana Islands]
4 November – 12 November Ulithi [Caroline Islands]
16 November – 17 November Hollandia [now Jayapura, Indonesia]
19 November – 14 December Manus [Island, Admiralty Islands, Papua New Guinea]
15 December – 26 December Hollandia
29 December – 31 December Windy [Bay- USS Windham Bay CVE-92, a Casablanca Class Escort Carrier]
6 January – 8 January 1945 Leyte [, Philippine Islands]
11 January – 28 January Mindoro [, Philippine Islands]
31 January – 7 February Leyte
14 February – 17 February Manus
22 February – 12 March Guadalcanal
21 March – 25 March Ulithi
1 April – 8 April Okinawa
14 April – 19 April Leyte
19 April – 1 June Inamoc [, Philippine Islands]
1 June – 5 June Leyte
[4 June 1945 – Okinawa Gunto Occupation]
8 June – 14 June Ulithi
15 June – 29 June Guam
29 June – 1 July Okinawa

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Subject: Nice header photo


Author:
OSD
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Date Posted: 12/24/10 15:15:01

Looks like the Tom Green County and the Washtenaw County in Hong Kong.
OSD

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Subject: TURKEYS GONE BYE BYE !


Author:
OSD
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Date Posted: 12/24/10 10:33:07

I CLEARED OFF THE HACKERS GARBAGE, I HOPE IT STAYS GONE. LET'S GET BACK TO NORMAL, LIKE TRACKING SANTA, SEABAT HAS THAT STUFF !.
OSD

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Subject: A CHANCE ENCOUNTER


Author:
OSD
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Date Posted: 12/24/10 15:08:19

Yesterday I was out shopping on my scooter and was headed to a local thrift store, when I saw in the distance on the other side of the street, another scooter headed towards me. It had a U.S. Flag like mine and it was almost like seeing myself. As it got closer he crossed the street and we both stopped and talked. It turns out he was in the 101 st. Airborne and jumped into Europe. We talked of what and where and ships and planes and adventures. We parted with a salute to each other and we both continued on our way. A nice moment !.
OSD

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Subject: Re: seeking LST-51 info or pics


Author:
Steve D.
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Date Posted: 12/14/12 02:28:10

My Father-in-Law was her 1st skipper. I have a year's worth of her Log Books and therefore names of her crewmembers from Dec 1943 thru Dec 1944.

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Subject: Norad Santa Tracker


Author:
OSD
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Date Posted: 12/24/10 10:37:41

SANTA TRACKER

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Subject: Old Sea Dog... a special request...


Author:
SeaBat
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Date Posted: 11/27/10 16:14:51

I know you are quite experienced with radio and communication equipment... I know nothing about the actual parts. Wondering if you can help explain what these things are in language that I can understand...

Diode
Capacitor
Conductor


Obviously, I am studying... I'm going to try to get my Technician's License and then a General one. After that, I'm going to try to learn Morse. I've had four classes so far and understand basics, but this next part is going to be hard for me since I don't know the mechanics.

Appreciate any help you can give this old SeaBat... (and don't quit grinning... lol)

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Subject: Re: A poem


Author:
Harry Dawson
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Date Posted: 12/11/10 22:43:25

How important can it be
When its just an LST
Built way back in "43"
Shold have never put to sea
Built by some sick and an evil mind
for one trip and no return
But we have made oh so many now
All we do is twist and turn

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Subject: A poem


Author:
Paul Sullenberger
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Date Posted: 12/10/10 15:51:46

I was re-reading a personal memoir I received from Art Aregoni of Caspian, MI. Art served aboard the LST 492 for a few months in 1945 while my father was aboard, and was transferred to the LST 1010 when the 492 returned to teh states. Art returned stateside in 1945, and was then assigned to the Pacific Theater, participating in the invasion of Okinawa aboard the 1010. He included this poem in his memoir:

THE LST
(IN MEMORIUM TO LST 1010)
By anonymous

I THINK THAT I SHALL NEVER SEE
A SHIP WORSE THAN AN LST
WITH GRACEFUL LINES RESEMBLING
A SCOW BUILT LIKE A GREMLING;
A SHIP WHOSE PAINT DISINTEGRATES,
FROM SALT AND LESSER PHOSPHATES;
A SHIP WHOSE STEERING ENGINE WORKS
WITH GRUNTS AND GROANS AND NERVOUS JERKS;
A SHIP THAT DOESN’T RUN, BUT TROTS,
THAT LABORS DOING SEVEN KNOTS.
MOST ANY SHIP WILL TRY TO PLEASE,
BUT ONLY GOD LOVES LSTs.

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Subject: Re: For David Fuller - LST 205


Author:
Phil Kosiba
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Date Posted: 12/11/10 02:00:52

David...saw your post..unfortunately the internet came along too late for so many WWII vets. My father was on the LST 205 as part of the original launching crew. He was a motor machinist mate and his picture is in the two group shots on one of the LST 205 sites. A Chicagoan he joined the Coast Guard and served in rescue life boats out of Holland Michigan until assigned to crew the LST 205 built at Seneca, Illinois. He stayed with the 205 thru the Phillipine landings. He eventually was assigned to harbor patrol in Le Harve, France and was discharged in 1946. He often talked of his shipmates and less about events like the West Loch explosions (most veterans minimized their experiences in the war) but w/o the powerful tool of the internet was not able to locate any of his friends. My dad passed away in September 1998 from cancer at age 79. He had a love for the Coast Guard. He was a good husband and father and a hard working guy that made the 'Greatest Generation' what they were...peace..!

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Subject: burned wreck at Pearl (Westloc)


Author:
OSD
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Date Posted: 12/10/10 14:20:09



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Subject: Pearl Harbor


Author:
OSD
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Date Posted: 12/ 7/10 11:38:58



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Subject: FDR'S ADDRESS AFTER THE ATTACK


Author:
OSD
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Date Posted: 12/ 5/10 19:09:02



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Subject: Pearl Harbor Video by Mel Holden


Author:
OSD
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Date Posted: 12/ 5/10 19:01:21

Thank You Mel


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Subject: IJN Coded Msg. " Climb mt. Miyataki" Video


Author:
OSD
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Date Posted: 12/ 5/10 18:35:03



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Subject: Well....


Author:
SeaBat
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Date Posted: 12/ 4/10 15:30:47

Old Sea Dog is celebrating the anniversary of his birth... again... And gee, are we glad!!!!!


HAPPY BIRTHDAY OSD!!!

Photobucket

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Subject: view of Ford Island, Nov. 1941


Author:
OSD
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Date Posted: 12/ 3/10 16:28:35


November 1941 view of Ford Island, Pearl Harbor.

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Subject: Too bad nobody took note !


Author:
Old Sea Dog
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Date Posted: 12/ 2/10 17:39:50

The Air Commanders' Remarkable Prevision
General Short's efforts to better Hawaii's defenses had resulted in April in completion, for War Department examination, of the joint commanders' revised defense plan for the joint Coastal Frontier (Oahu and adjacent land and sea areas as required for Oahu's defense; the Hawaiian Naval Coastal Frontier, in distinction, included also Midway, Johnston, Palmyra, Canton, and Wake). This plan, specifying the joint and separate responsibilities of Army and Navy, was agreed to by General Short and Admiral Bloch on 11 April 1941 and forwarded to Washington, together with a previously agreed-upon Annex VII and other documents.59 One of these documents, the estimate of the Army and Navy air commanders in the area, includes surmises so precisely confirmed by the event of the next December as to justify quotation of the following excerpts:

[From I (c) I A successful, sudden raid against our ships and naval installations on Oahu might prevent effective offensive action by our forces in the Western Pacific for a long period.

[From I (e) I It appears possible that ORANGE submarines and/or an ORANGE fast raiding force might arrive in Hawaiian waters with no prior warning from our intelligence service.

[From II (b)] . . . The aircraft at present available in Hawaii are inadequate to maintain for any extended period . . . a patrol extensive enough to insure that an air attack from an ORANGE carrier cannot arrive over Oahu as a complete surprise.

[From III (b)] It appears that the most likely and dangerous form of attack on Oahu would be an air attack. It is believed that at present such an attack would most likely be launched from one or more carriers which would probably approach inside of three hundred miles.

[From III (e)] In a dawn attack there is a high probability that it could be delivered as a complete surprise in spite of any patrols we might be using and that it would find us in a condition of readiness under which pursuit would be slow to start. . . .

[From IV (a) Action open to us] Run daily patrols as far as possible to seaward through 360 degrees to reduce the probabilities of surface or air surprise. This would be desirable but can only be effectively maintained with present personnel and matériel for a very short period and as a practicable measure cannot therefore be undertaken unless other intelligence indicates that a surface raid is probable within rather narrow time limits.60

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Subject: Dec. 3, 1941 (a bit long, but interesting)


Author:
Old Sea Dog
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Date Posted: 12/ 2/10 17:25:16

America's very success, in September 1940, in breaking the Japanese diplomatic cipher, code named "Purple," had the ironic effect of distracting attention from where it could have been more profitably focused in the fateful months leading up to Pearl Harbor. The Purple cipher carried the highest-level diplomatic messages of the Japanese Empire; this was intelligence of such remarkable value that it was given the code name magic. The Purple cipher was generated by a complex machine. It used a cascade of rotating switches to encipher every letter of a message in a different key from the last or the next. In one position of the switches the letter A would become G; in the next it would become P. The U.S. Army's code breakers had, in eighteen months of intense effort, deduced the wiring and setup of the machine without ever seeing one, a feat of pure analysis the likes of which had scarcely before been seen. After hastily soldering together telephone switches and relays to produce a replica of the machine, they proceeded to decode the Japanese messages almost as quickly as they arrived.

On the morning of December 3, 1941, a Purple message came through ordering Japan's embassy in Washington to destroy its code books, and even one of its two vital Purple machines. Frank Rowlett, a senior cryptanalyst of the Army's Signal Intelligence Service, arrived at his office at noon that day from a meeting, plucked this latest magic decrypt from his in-box, and proceeded to read its contents with mounting incredulity. With only a single machine it would obviously be impossible for the embassy to continue its normal flow of business. Colonel Otis Sadtler, who was in charge of distributing the magic decrypts, showed up in Rowlett's office at that moment and began to pepper him with questions. Had the Japanese ever sent anything like this before? Could they be getting ready to change their codes? Perhaps they suspected their current codes had been broken? Then the only possible meaning of this extraordinary message sank in. Sadtler pulled himself to attention. "Rowlett, do you know what this means? It means Japan is about to go to war with the United States!" And, decrypt in hand, Sadtler took off literally running down the corridor of the Munitions Building to alert the head of Army intelligence.

Partly this was a matter of manpower, partly it was a matter of human nature. Magic was such a dazzling prize that it blinded its possessors to the smaller but sometimes more valuable gems that lay buried among the dross and slag of supply orders and fleet maneuvers. JN-25 was the most recent descendant of the Japanese Navy's Red code; like its predecessors it was an enciphered code. At the time the new code first appeared on June 1, 1939, the U.S. Navy's Washington code breaking staff had grown to about thirty-six hands. By this time the "research desk" had acquired the official bureaucratic designation of OP-20-G, designating it as part of the Office of Naval Communications, OP-20, and Safford was back in charge after several tours of sea duty. The staff of thirty-six included translators, clerks, radio direction-finding experts, intelligence analysts, and officers responsible for the security of the Navy's own codes; only a handful were trained cryptanalysts, and of these only two or three could be spared to work on the new code, which was initially given the designation AN-1.

By the summer of 1941, as tensions in the Pacific grew, every section of OP-20-G was desperately short of help. Messages in the Purple cipher, which could be read in their totality and almost always the same day they were transmitted, claimed first priority. Meanwhile seven thousand AN-1 messages were pouring in each month by mail to Washington, while only sixteen men could be spared to work on them. As the Navy began calling up Naval Reserve officers throughout the summer and fall, that figure crept up by about one per month. Station Cast, the Navy's intercept station at Cavite in the Philippines, was also trying its hand at compiling the reams of printouts and worksheets needed to tease apart the AN code and its additives; since spring 1941 a highly secret collaboration between Cavite and the British government's code breakers in Singapore had been under way on the project as well. But it simply wasn't enough.

Five years later, with the war safely won, a few of OP-20-G's cryptanalysts were tidying up loose ends and decided to go back and try to crack the unread AN-1 traffic that had piled up in the months just before Pearl Harbor. What they found was enough to break an intelligence officer's heart. Over and over, the orders to the Japanese fleet during October and November 1941 repeated a single theme: Complete all preparations and be on a total war footing by November 20. Several messages referred to exercises in "ambushing" the "U.S. enemy." And one signal, dispatched November 4, ordered a destroyer to pick up torpedoes that Carrier Divisions 1 and 2 "are to fire against anchored capital ships on the morning in question." None specifically mentioned Pearl Harbor, and indeed many other intelligence indications in those critical months pointed to the Philippines, or even the Panama Canal, as possible targets of Japanese naval action if war broke out. Yet the pre­Pearl Harbor AN traffic, had it been broken at the time, would certainly have conveyed heavy hints of what was to come.

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Subject: Matson ship Lurline and the Japanese fleet


Author:
OSD
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Date Posted: 12/ 2/10 10:55:58

Matson Liner Lurline Intercepts Coded Japanese Low Radio Frequency Transmissions

The luxury liner Lurline was at sea with passengers on a voyage from California to Hawaii on November 30, 1941 when her first assistant radio operator, Leslie E. Grogan, one of the most experienced radio operators of the Matson Line, recorded that he picked up a faint signal which he could not identify. The direction of the signal was from northwest by west—considered to be a peculiar area for traffic that time of the year.

John Toland provides a detailed explanation of the source of this signal—Station JCS, Yokohama, Japan—copied on and off from November 30 to December 2. Grogan documented the results of his endeavors in the ship's journal, allowing this author to benefit from his efforts.

"The Japs are blasting away on the lower Marine Radio frequency—it is all in the Japanese code, and continues for several hours. Some of the signals were loud, and others weak, but in most every case, the repeat-back was acknowledged verbatum [sic]. It appears to me that the Jap is not using any deception of "Signal Detection" and boldly blasts away, using the Call letters JCS and JOS, and other Japanese based stations that have their transmitting keys all tied-in together, and controlled from a common source, presumably Tokio" [sic]. . . .

So much of the signal reaching us on the SS Lurline were good enough to get good R.D.F. [Radio Direction Finding Bearings]. We noted that signals were being repeated back, possibly for copying by crafts with small antennas. The main body of signals came from a Northwest by West area, which from our second night from Los Angeles bound for Honolulu—would be North and West of Honolulu.

Having crossed the Pacific for 30 years, never heard JCS Yokohama Japan before at 9 P.M. our time on the lower Marine Frequency, and then rebroadcast simultaneously on the lower Marine frequency from some point in the Pacific.

If anyone should ask me, I would say it's the Jap's Mobilization Battle Order. Rudy Asplund kept Captain Berndtson [the ship's master] informed and presume the Bridge Officers must have thought us "Nuts" with so much D.F. Tracking down of signals.

It is now 3AM and am trying to cool off after that hectic session earlier.

Have jotted down all the particulars as they present themselves, and it is my desire to make a record of this because [I] sense things! Might prove worthy, who knows? GM 3.30 [sic] AM Dec. 1, 1941.

Yes Mr. Grogan, you did sense correctly. Hope your family and kin find time to view this web site and note that this author appreciates your effort to help zero-in on the truth about the attack on Pearl Harbor. (Just checked the Social Security Death Index and discovered that Leslie Grogan of Daly City, California, was born on November 14, 1894 and died in August 1974—may he rest in peace knowing his contribution to the history of a free nation has been recognized.)

On the night of Monday, December 1, the Japanese signals were once more intercepted.

Again Rudy and I pick up without any trouble all the Japanese coded Wireless signals like last night—it goes on for two hours like before, and we are now making a concise record to turn in to the Naval Intelligence when we arrive in Honolulu, Wednesday December 3rd, 1941.

On Tuesday night, December 2nd, the signals became even stronger as Kido Butai drew closer to its target.

We continue to pick up the bold Japanese General Order signals—it can't be anything else. We get good Radio Direction Finder bearings, mostly coming from a Northwesterly direction from our position. The Jap floating units continue their bold repetition of wireless signals, presumably for the smaller crafts in their vanguard of ships, etc. The Japanese shore stations JCS and JOS are keyed by remote tie-in, coming from Tokyo I presume, and if we had a recording device, it would only prove what we ourselves jot down, and we can't help but know that so much of it is a repeat back, letter for letter, because we have copied the original signals coming from Japanese land based stations, etc.

The Japs are so bold in using these low Marine frequencies too, but with all the tension we've seen up to now, it's safe to say something is going to happen, and mighty soon, but how soon? All this display means something—time will tell, and tonights [sic] Radio Detection signals have come from a NW by W from Honolulu, and from the signals, the Japs must be bunched up, biding time.

At 9:00 A.M. on December 3, 1941, the USS Lurline docked at its usual pier near Honolulu's famous Aloha Tower, as stated by Toland on Pg. 285.

Grogan and Asplund hurried the few blocks up Bishop Street to the downtown intelligence office of the Fourteenth Naval District in the Hotel Alexander Young Building. After introducing themselves to Lieutenant Commander George Warren Pease, they turned over the data. Pease promised to pass on the warning but there is no record that he forwarded the information either to the Fourteenth Naval District intelligence officer, Captain Irving Mayfield, or to Washington.

Pease was killed in an air crash in 1945.

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Subject: South Korea + US Exercises


Author:
OSD
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Date Posted: 11/27/10 10:15:47


USS GEORGE WASHINGTON + ESCORT SHIPS
.......................................
South Korea and the United States were set to launch large-scale naval exercises Sunday in another potent show of force against North Korea, five days after the North bombarded a southern island and warned it could follow up with more attacks.

The nuclear-powered USS George Washington, with more than 6,000 sailors and 75 fighter jets aboard, prepared for the naval drills with South Korea in the Yellow Sea.

The drills are set to run through Wednesday, and about 10 warships have been mobilized for the exercises.

North Korea has bristled at the exercises, and its last-remaining ally China has also voiced concerns over the joint drills that will take place close to its territory, claiming that they will only heighten tension in the region.

The North's attack Tuesday on Yeonpyeong Island killed two marines and two civilians. The deadly shelling drew international condemnation and angered South Koreans, who came under the communist neighbor's first attack targeting civilians since the 1950-53 Korean War.

Although this week's exercises were planned before the North's strike on Yeonpyeong, Seoul and Washington announced the date of the drills a day after the attack from Pyongyang.

Calling the drills "defensive in nature," the U.S. Forces Korea said in a statement that they "demonstrate the strength of the ROK-U.S. alliance and our commitment to regional stability through deterrence."

As the allies pushed for the drills, North Korea ratcheted up its verbal rhetoric, accusing South Korea and the U.S. of staging the joint drill to rehearse an attack on Pyongyang.

"The situation on the Korean Peninsula is inching closer to the brink of war due to the reckless plan of those trigger-happy elements to stage again the war exercises targeted against the DPRK," the North's Korean Central News Agency said in a report Friday, using the acronym of the country's official name, the Democratic People's Republic of Korea.

The drills will take place off the west coast town of Taean, far south of the tense Yellow Sea border where Tuesday's attack took place and where the South Korean Cheonan corvette was sunk by a North Korean torpedo in March. Forty-six sailors were killed in that deadly incident.

Officials at the South's Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS) said the participating ships have no plan to move northward near the sea border with North Korea, but they would hold "high-intensity" live-fire sea drills.

JCS officials said they are closely monitoring activities by North Korean military over mounting concerns of another provocation.
"North Korea's southwestern coastline long-range artillery batteries have maintained a ready-to-fire posture," said a JCS official on condition of anonymity. "We are closely watching movements of the North Korean military."

The nuclear-powered carrier belonging to the U.S. Seventh Fleet based in Yokosuka, Japan, has an operational range of 1,000 kilometers. Aircraft aboard the carrier include the F/A-18E/F Super Hornet, the F/A-18A/C Hornet, the E-2C Hawkeye airborne early warning aircraft and the P3-C antisubmarine surveillance aircraft.

(Yonhap News)

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Subject: LST 1083 ( one of the LSTs the OSD was on)


Author:
OSD
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Date Posted: 11/27/10 09:42:13

LST 1083 USS PLUMAS COUNTY
The first LST to anchor in Japanese home port after WW II


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Subject: LST 806 and more in South Korean Navy


Author:
Old Sea Dog
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Date Posted: 11/26/10 16:13:01

Tank Landing Ships (LST) sold to South Korea. Unknown how many of these are still afloat. Most have been scrapped years ago. But for a time the LST 806 was a South Korean Ship.

* Cheonan (LST 801; aka Yonghwa [17] ; formerly USS LST-659; sold to the government of South Korea, 25 May 1947 as Ryong Hwa [18] ; acquired July 1, 1949) [10]
* Cheolong (LST 802; formerly ?; acquired Sep 18, 1951) [10]
* Andong (LST 803; formerly ?; acquired Sep 3, 1952) [10]
* Cheonbo (LST 805; formerly ?; acquired Sep 3, 1952) [10]
* Yongbi (LST 806; formerly ?; acquired Sep 3, 1952) [10]
* Unbong (LST 807/LST 671; formerly USS LST-1010)
* Deokbong (LST 808/LST 672; formerly USS LST-227)
* Bibong (LST 809/LST 673; formerly USS LST-218)
* Gyebong (LST 810/LST 675; formerly USS Berkshire County (LST-288))
* Jangsu (LST 811; formerly USS LST-53/APL-59)
* Wibong (LST 812/LST 676; formerly USS Johnson County (LST-849))
* Suyeong (LST 813/LST 677; formerly USS Kane County (LST-853))
* Bukhan (LST 815/LST 678; formerly USS Linn County (LST-900); donated as a museum)
* Hwasan (LST 816/LST 679; formerly USS Pender County (LST-1080); donated as a museum)

Here is a link to the listing of South Korean Ships and their former designation. List of South Korean Ships

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Subject: LST 740 AT LEYTE


Author:
OSD
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Date Posted: 11/23/10 18:55:09


LST 740 AT LEYTE (TACLOBAN)

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Subject: LST 806


Author:
Old Sea Dog
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 11/26/10 07:38:00

LST-806
Awards, Citations and Campaign Ribbons

- American Campaign Medal
- Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal (3)
- World War II Victory Medal
- Philippines Liberation Medal

# LST-542 Class Tank Landing Ship: Laid down, 25 July 1944, at Missouri Valley Bridge & Iron Co., Evansville, IN.
# Launched, 7 September 1944
# Commissioned USS LST-806, 28 September 1944
# During World War II USS LST-806 was assigned to the Asiatic-Pacific Theater and participated in following Campaign
Consolidation and capture of Southern Philippines;
Palawan Island landings
February and March 1945
Borneo operation;
Brunei Bay operation, June 1945

# Following World War II LST-806 performed minesweeping operations in the Pacific from November 1945 through February 1946
# Decommissioned, 20 May 1946
# Struck from the Naval Register, 19 July 1946
# Final Disposition, sold for scrapping, 20 November 1947 to Bosey, Philippines
# LST-806 earned three battle stars for World War II service

Link to Navscource site LST 806

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Subject: The LST 806 at Palawan


Author:
Old Sea Dog
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Date Posted: 11/18/10 15:30:40


US Navy LST (Landing Ship Tank) assault on Palawan, Philippines

Written on the back is:

Everything is not Jake with Jake—Shot down during the U.S. assault on Palawan in the Philippines. This Jap Jake float plane is examined by men from the Navy LST (Landing Ship Tank) in the background. Jake crashed on the shore near Puerto Princesa.

Photograph by The New York Times, Times Square, New York, City, U.S.A.
Feature release: March 27, 1945

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Subject: LST 125


Author:
Old Sea Dog
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 11/18/10 16:15:28



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Subject: We all celebrated Thanksgiving..


Author:
SeaBat
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 11/26/10 05:40:04


because of you...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IRnTXmrJ1tQ

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Subject: LST 740


Author:
Clark E. Parks
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Date Posted: 11/17/10 06:51:58

Greetings,
I was a Signalman 1/c on LST 740 during WW II in the Pacific. I'm trying to find my old shipmates. I do mean old since they whould be at least 85 which is my age. I have recently set up a web site telling of the history and story of the ship.

www.usslst740.com

Take a look.
I would appreciate any of you who may know of a shipmate or their relatives to let them know about my site.

Thanks,
Clark E. Parks

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Subject: The LST Building during WWII


Author:
Old Sea Dog
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Date Posted: 11/18/10 15:54:38


Fort Knox, KY LST Building in WWII

This is eligible for the National Register.

From the sign: The LST Building replicated every detail of the tank deck of an LST ship including replication of interior girders and rivets. Details of the upper deck of an LST ship such as the railing and pilot house were also replicated. Since the tank deck rides below below water level, the building originally had no windows--these were added when the building was a classroom.

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Subject: A comment on Veterans Day


Author:
The Old Sea Dog
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Date Posted: 11/13/10 16:28:07

I would like to see the retailers of America stop using Veterans Day to have a sale on whatever they are selling. They put American Flags out and have a "VETERANS DAY SALE", What a crock !.

Oh yea, I want to honor American Veterans by buying a car, rug, matress, tires, TV, Computer, Eyeglasses, Pizza, Coat, Paint, or whatever you happen to be selling.

Have we lost sight of those brave Americans who gave their lives in the trenches of WWI, or the brave Americans who fell at one of the many towns in Europe in WWII, or the many islands in the Pacific where the enemy's guns cut them down and left them lying on the beaches or inland.

I guess in this modern connected world there is just no place for remembering those who fell in battle to keep us free. But for those who "were there", they will always be remembered and honored.

The Old Sea Dog

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Subject: Looking for veterans who served...


Author:
SeaBat
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Date Posted: 11/12/10 14:44:43

2nd Battalion, 327th Infantry Div, 101st Airborne; March, 1968 at Thua Thien, South VietNam

If you or anyone you know has a contact that would be willing to speak with me, please let me know.

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Subject: Honor Flight


Author:
SeaBat
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Date Posted: 11/12/10 03:17:05

http://www.10tv.com/live/content/video/10tv.html?videoUrl=%2Fsites%2F10tv%2Fvideos%2F2010%2F11%2F11%2Fhonor-flight.xml

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Subject: Ex USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67)


Author:
Paul Sullenberger
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Date Posted: 11/ 2/10 12:16:45

JFK in Philly
I know this is an amphibs site, but I couldn't resist posting a photo of my ex-ship from Google Earth. Here she is at NISMF Philadelphia. There is some effort to turn her into a floating museum at Newport, RI, in conjunction with the Rhode Island Aviation Hall of Fame. The Navy has officially designated her as "available for donation" and money that had previously been raised to convert either the ex USS Forrestal (CV-59) or ex USS Saratoga (CV-60) has been transferred to the RIAHOF and Kennedy Museum funds. She went MIA from Google Earth for a few months, they updated the Mayport images after she left there, but hadn't updated the Philly images until about 6 months after she arrived there.

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Subject: A tribute from Dave Bronson


Author:
SeaBat
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Date Posted: 11/11/10 04:02:24

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x4FEQXCR6Jc

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Subject: To honor all of you... on this Veteran's Day


Author:
SeaBat
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Date Posted: 11/11/10 00:52:04

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r2RwRi2TjA0&NR=1

My simple thank you is not enough... please know that we honor and respect all that you have done for us. You ARE heroes!

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Subject: Sunset at Sea


Author:
Old Sea Dog
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Date Posted: 10/24/10 19:00:50

A TYPICAL SUNSET AT SEA


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Subject: Words don't work to describe this


Author:
Old Sea Dog
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Date Posted: 10/24/10 19:30:39

Sunset over the Bering Sea


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Subject: 441st. Intelligence Corps + 319th Company


Author:
OSD
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Date Posted: 01/26/10 16:43:37


CIC Patch used in World War II worn by CIC Agent (Sergeant) Albert L. Slater of Niles, KS.
...................................................................
On 25 August 1944 in Brisbane, Australia, the 441st Counterintelligence Corps Detachment, and one subsection, the 319th Military Intelligence Company, was organized under TO&E 50-500. (It later became the 441st Military Intelligence Detachment (Airborne in 1966). The responsibility for the conduct of counter-intelligence operations within units or agencies of the United States Army in Australia was vested in the Commanding General, USAFIA (original counterpart of the United States Army Pacific).

On 20 November 1944 the 441st Counterintelligence Corps (CIC) Detachment was reassigned to the New Guinea campaign with the following missions: Cryptographic and disaffection investigations, ship paneling and allied port security measures including the checking of native craft moving along the coast, investigation of incidents and sabotage cases, and provisions for the general security of installations. The detachment inaugurated a highly effective native police-boy system in cooperation with the Netherlands Indies Civil Administration. These youths contacted village chiefs, led reconnaissance patrols, helped interrogate native suspects, and assisted in special investigations and in maintaining an informant net.

The balance of the New Guinea campaign saw a repetition of previous actions by the 441st. The detachment landed at Noemfoor Island, Sansapor, New Britain, and Morotai. On the eve of the invasion of Leyte Gulf, the 441st could look back on ten months of 1944 during which its officers, agents and other CIC detachments from other units had functioned in staging, combat, and post-operational phases with 15 divisions, one special task force, one regimental combat team, four corps, and two armies.

The battle of Okinawa opened with the initial assault on 1 April 1945. Fourteen CIC agents lost their lives in support of the Okinawan operation. Overall, the CIC conducted its mission with great skill and appreciation of the poten­tially explosive situation on Japanese home territory.

Training and planning were under way for CIC participation in operation "Olympic" and "Coronet", the invasion of the Japanese homeland, when VJ-Day came. Armies, corps and divisions that were geared for combat moved into Japan to occupy it peacefully. CIC detachments accompanied the tac­tical units into mainland Japan, but their mission was not clear, since no one knew how the Japanese public would react to the American occupation. The 80th Metropolitan CIC detachment landed at Yokohama on 2 September 1945 and advance elements of the 441st CIC detachment on 15 September 1945. The 441st CIC detachment entered Tokyo and officially set up headquarters.

On 26 September 1945, I Corps units landed at Wakayama, accom­panied by a CIC detachment which moved into Osaka, Kyoto, Nagoya, and other Japanese cities. By 1 November 1945, it was apparent that the occupation was to be peaceful, and CIC detachments were detached from combat units and set up on a regional and area basis.

441st Headquarters, Norton Hall, Tokyo, 1946
..........................................................................................
At the end of World War II, the 441st Counterintelligence Corps (CIC) Detachment was assigned to Japan. Along with the 319th MI Company, the 441st proved to be the most important operating agency of the Civil Intelligence Section. These two organizations formed the major investigating agencies in the field. The missions included: covering foreign espionage, treason, sabotage, sedition, subversive actions, security violations, and any act inimical to the policies of the occupation forces.
............................................................................................
441st CIC Detachment (Theater Headquarters)
Galloway, Dennis R
Carlson, Russell
Wilkins, Lloyd H
Stewart, Roger S
Earle, Richard G
Colbach, Roman H
Wilson, Alton A
Blackley, Horace A
Bellatti, Walter R
Johnson, Arthur W
Warren, Edmund A
Corkery, Gerard J
Major, Thomas H
McCloskey, John D
Brooks, Walter
Hogg, Calvin R
Cartwright, Peter C
Maloney, Peter J
McNally, Robert W
Malapit, Mariano S
Evans, William D
Bank, Vernon C
Reyes, Edward
Murphy, Francis J
Wickson, Edward J
Born, Harry E

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Subject: LST 512


Author:
Paul Sullenberger
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 07/26/10 11:53:24

LST 512 Launching Amtrac

LST 512 May 1945

2 more views of the LST 512. The first is dated May 1945, which would be the approximate time that it came out of the shipyard at Norfolk to head for Miami for additional preparation for the war bond tour. An accompanying description said that the crew was waving to people ashore as it arrived at the drydock, however by May of 45 it was leaving, not arriving. No information on where it is during the Amtrac launch.

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Subject: Question LST 472


Author:
DJB
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Date Posted: 02/19/10 22:22:18

I have reviewed the campaigns that the LST 472 was involved in during the war but I have a question that I can not ask my Dad (deceased). He did not enlist until August 1943. I do know he was in the Green Island Landings in February 1944 on the LST. How did he get on the ship since it was already in the Pacific? Where would I find this information?

Thanks, DJB

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Subject: use search engines


Author:
Old Sea Dog
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Date Posted: 10/23/10 19:18:30

Albert: try using Google for Images and type in things like "LCI ### at Omaha Beach", or just type into search "LCI ###". You can use any number of variations and also other search engines like BING, YAHOO, IXQUICK, OR OTHERS. A search for pictures of one single LST or LCI or whatever ship, can be exhausting and sometimes you just stumble upon them by accident.

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Subject: LST 740


Author:
Clark E. Parks
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Date Posted: 10/18/10 13:52:09

Ex SM 1/c LST 740

www.usslst740.com

Ship history

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Subject: A Great WWII Picture (it has it all)


Author:
Old Sea Dog
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Date Posted: 10/15/10 19:14:17



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Subject: LST 751 ( for Greg )


Author:
The Old Sea Dog
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Date Posted: 10/10/10 08:37:48

LST-751 was laid down on 16 April 1944 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp., Neville Island; launched on 27 May 1944; sponsored by Mrs. John W. Oahler; and commissioned on 26 June 1944, Lt. Robert E. Garris, USNR, in command.

During World War II, LST-751 was assigned to the Asiatic-Pacific theater and participated in the Leyte landings in November 1944 and the Lingayen Gulf landing in January 1945. Following the war, LST-751 performed occupation duty in the Far East until mid-July 1946. She was decommissioned on 21 August 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 15 October that same year. On 13 November 1947, the ship was transferred to the Maritime Administration for disposal.

LST-751 earned two battle stars for World War II service.

Here is a link to the NAVSOURCE page about the LST 751 LST 751

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Subject: LST 751


Author:
Greg
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Date Posted: 10/ 9/10 03:25:34

My father, Ray Duncan, was on LST 751 in the Asiatic-Pacific. He passed away several years ago and I'm trying to learn more about his time on this ship. It would also be great if any of his shipmates would respond.

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Subject: The Book "Two Years Before the Mast"


Author:
Old Sea Dog
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Date Posted: 10/ 2/10 16:52:02


I have been listening to a tape reading of "Two years before the Mast" and learning some of the ways of the old clipper ships and comparing the way some of the old traditions evolved into use by the modern Navy. If you are able read the book and take a step back in time to 1843 and go "Round the Horn" to early California before the gold rush forever changed it. Climb the rigging and unfurl the top gallants and sky sails and ride out the seas when the ships were wood and the men were iron. You will enjoy it !.
The Old Sea Dog

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Subject: Book "Strong Men Armed"


Author:
Old Sea Dog
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Date Posted: 10/ 4/10 17:51:50


Strong Men Armed (The United States Marines Against Japan)relates the U.S. Marines' unprecedented, relentless drive across the Pacific during World War II, from Guadalcanal to Okinawa, detailing their struggle to dislodge from heavily fortified islands an entrenched enemy who had vowed to fight to extinction--and did. (All but three of the Marines' victories required the complete annihilation of the Japanese defending force.) As scout and machine-gunner for the First Marine Division, the author fought in all its engagements till his wounding at Peleliu. Here he uses firsthand experience and impeccable research to re-create the nightmarish battles. The result is both an exciting chronicle and a moving tribute to the thousands of men who died in reeking jungles and on palm-studded beaches, thousands of miles from home and fifty years before their time, of whom Admiral Chester W. Nimitz once said, Uncommon valor was a common virtue.Strong Men Armed includes over a dozen maps, a chronology of the war in the Pacific, the Marine Medal of Honor Winners in World War II, and Marine Corps aces in World War II.

Written by Robert Leckie, Strong Men Armed has been a perennial bestselling classic account of the Pacific theater in World War II. As scout and machine-gunner for the First Marine Division, Leckie fought in all its engagements until his wounding at Peleliu. Here he uses firsthand experience and impeccable research to re-create the nightmarish battles of the Pacific campaign.

I found a 1st. Edition hardback copy of this book from 1962 at a Library book sale for $ 1.00. Considering the book is valued at from $ 30.00 to $50.00, I feel I did real good on this one. It will be added to my collection of WWII books which has out grown it's first book case and is expanding into another.

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Subject: Things are Shipshape here !


Author:
The Old Sea Dog
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Date Posted: 10/ 1/10 18:33:28


Yes, I have my house back and my "houseguests" have moved out. I can now have the freedom of moving about my house without the problem of bothering someone.

I can and will get back to checking the forum daily and posting more stuff. I am working on an hour by hour timeline for Guadalcanal, and details about the Amphibious Landing Craft used .

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Subject: RARE WESTLOC PHOTOS


Author:
OLD SEA DOG
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Date Posted: 10/ 1/10 18:51:28

AWAY ALL BOATS !

VIEW OF THE WESTLOC DISASTER

MORE WESTLOC



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Subject: LST 933


Author:
Bill Bozek
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Date Posted: 08/30/10 04:03:52

My father served on LST 933. He has restored the friendship with one of his shipmates Joe Fogarty who has since move to FL. I had the honor of meeting Joe and his wife when they appeared on Dad's doorstep one summer's day. It was great to hear the stories, see the renewed friendship blossom.

I have discovered a website dedicated to Lt. Margil Leroy Stokes, the original skipper of the 933. On this site are pictures of the gunner's mates. My Dad is on the right with the tee shirt. This weekend the LST 325 will be in Pgh and I am going to talk dad into going to show me 'his ship' I really am looking forward to seeing her.

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Subject: LST 599 at Okinawa


Author:
OSD
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Date Posted: 10/19/09 18:53:36


LST's took their share of the enemy's attention during World War II. LST-599'a crew fights flames off Okinawa on 3 April 1945 after a kamikaze exploded on deck. Although prophets of doom insisted that LST really meant Large, Slow Target, the type proved remarkably hardy. Of 1,117 LST's completed in Britain and the United States, 53 were lost to all causes during 1942-45. Twenty-six American LST's were lost to enemy action, and 13 more to the "perils of the sea."

OSD

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Subject: LST 512


Author:
Paul Sullenberger
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Date Posted: 08/ 7/10 09:04:19

Florida Governor visits LST 512
Florida Governor Millard F. Carnes aboard the LST 512. Information with the original photo said that this was in July 1946 in Tampa; that would have been after the tour had concluded. It is possible that the information was incorrect since Tampa was not listed the ship's history as one of the tour cities. It was outfitted in Miami, in April 1945, however it was not open to the public for tours yet.

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Subject: LST 726


Author:
OSD
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Date Posted: 08/26/10 07:04:29


">

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Subject: LST 726


Author:
Old Sea Dog
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Date Posted: 08/25/10 10:54:50



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Subject: Re: LST 726


Author:
Old Sea Dog
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Date Posted: 08/23/10 08:18:12


Jerry: Your father's ship, the LST 726, was involved in troop landings at Iwo Jima in Feb. 1945 and Okinawa in April, 1945. Many men were killed in the assualt on Iwo Jima. It was a hard fought battle by both sides. The Japanese were prepared to fight to the death for their leader (a tradition). No quarter was asked for or given by either side. If I remember correctly the LST 726 was one of the LST's that served as a hospital ship for the wounded Marines, and that would have effected the crew of the 726.

I'm sure your father saw the horrors of war first hand, with death and destruction right in front of him. Many men chose to keep those images to themselves as they were shocking to see.

You should be very proud that your father fought for his country as he did. Every man no matter if he was a cook, or a Marine, did their part to end a terrible conflict that was thrust upon us.

Also I think that the famous flag raised on Mt, Suribachi on Okinawa came from your fathers LST. That is something that historians will always remember. So be very proud of your fathers war record even though he never talked that much about it.

When the war ended the U. S. Fleet was assembled in Tokyo harbor for the signing of the Japanese surrender and your fathers ship was there. An honor for the LST's that were the work horses of the Pacific Campaign. They carried the men and equipment across the Pacific to all the Japanese held islands.

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Subject: Navy Shoots Down Drone with Lazer Weapon


Author:
Old Sea Dog
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Date Posted: 07/21/10 03:59:42

HAVE WE COME A LONG WAY OR WHAT ?


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Subject: LST 158


Author:
Paul Sullenberger
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Date Posted: 08/ 7/10 08:59:29

Wreck of LST 158

This is a Google Earth view of Licata, Sicily. The hulk of the LST 158 can be made out in this image. She remained in place on the beach where she sunk until after the war, subsequently it was scrapped to the waterline, the remaining hull that was underwater is still visible.

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Subject: Women in the Navy


Author:
Buddy LST 1126 (:-0)
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Date Posted: 08/ 4/10 01:39:15

First Woman Takes Helm of Carrier Group
July 31, 2010
Daily Press, Newport News, Va.

When Nora W. Tyson entered the Navy in 1979, women were not allowed to go to sea on aircraft carriers.

The idea of a woman commanding a mighty carrier strike group? That was certainly for another day.

That day arrived Thursday for Rear Adm. Tyson, who made history in assuming command of Carrier Strike Group Two in a ceremony on board the USS George H.W. Bush.

The strike group consists of the Bush, America's newest carrier, four guided-missile cruisers; Destroyer Squadron 22, which includes six guided-missile destroyers and two frigates, and Carrier Air Wing 8, with eight squadrons of aircraft.

In accepting her new assignment, Tyson spoke of the challenges that the Navy faces and said she was humbled to be selected. Talking later with reporters, she downplayed her history-making step.

"As far as the trailblazing piece, I understand I am the first woman on the job," she said. "But I'm a professional just like my fellow officers are, and my fellow strike group commanders."

Excerpt from www.military.com

Quite a climb for that lady in 30 years.

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Subject: North Korea Again !


Author:
Old Sea Dog
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Date Posted: 07/26/10 10:05:31


July 21: The massive USS George Washington aircraft carrier is escorted into the Busan port in South Korea for joint military exercises.
............................................................................................................
US displays its power with drills by air and sea off Korean peninsula as North stays clear

ABOARD THE USS GEORGE WASHINGTON

ABOARD THE USS GEORGE WASHINGTON (AP) — The East Sea off the coast of the Korean peninsula roiled Monday with U.S. and South Korean ships, submarines, fighter jets and helicopters — high-profile military maneuvers intended to show North Korea that it is being watched. Military officials said that despite threats of retaliation, North Korea was staying clear. Most of the firepower for the four-day exercises — which North Korea condemns — has been flying off the decks of the USS George Washington, a U.S. supercarrier that can carry up to 70 aircraft and more than 5,000 sailors and aviators. Washington and Seoul are hoping the drills — and the deployment of the most potent symbol of American military reach in the U.S. Navy — will send a powerful message to North Korea in the wake of the March sinking of a South Korean warship that killed 46 sailors. An international investigation determined the ship was sunk by torpedo, likely in a sneak attack by a North Korean submarine.

"The message is in the eye of the beholder," said Rear Adm. Daniel Cloyd. "But we would hope that they would take this and messages in the future as a message of resolve. We hope this will give them pause." North Korea — which has denied any connection to the sinking — has threatened to counter the maneuvers with some sort of military show of its own. But on the second day of the maneuvers, scheduled to run through Wednesday, officials said no signs have been seen the North will make good on its saber-rattling rhetoric. Cmdr. Ray Hesser, head of an anti-submarine helicopter squadron on the George Washington, said North Korean submarines are largely restricted to shallow, coastal waters. "We're not expecting to see them out here," he said. "I would not think they would be willing or wanting to come all the way out here." He said the South Korean warship, the Cheonan, may have been unprepared when the attack occurred, noting that U.S. ships observe higher readiness. It was the worst military attack on South Korea since the 1950-53 Korean War.

"It was like a sucker punch," Hesser said. "It doesn't say much about how much of a fighter you are." The "Invincible Spirit" exercises involve about 20 ships, 200 aircraft and about 8,000 U.S. and South Korean sailors. It is the Japan-based George Washington's first deployment to South Korea since 2008. The anti-submarine phase of the training — which also involves anti-ship and anti-aircraft operations — is particularly important because it helps ready the U.S. and South Korean navies to respond to scenarios focused on North Korean submarine activities.

"I am concerned about every submarine underwater that I don't know about," Capt. David Lausman, the carrier's commanding officer, said Monday. Lausman said the attack demonstrated the opaque nature of Pyongyang's military, which he said should not be underestimated. "North Korea's danger lies because they are unpredictable," he said. "The sinking of the Cheonan is a prime example." North Korea has strongly protested the exercises, saying they are a provocation, and has threatened retaliation. In flourishes of rhetoric typical of the regime, it vowed to respond with a "sacred war" and a "powerful nuclear deterrence."
........................................
So how many of our subs are in the area, more than a few i'd bet .

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Subject: LST 512


Author:
Paul Sullenberger
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Date Posted: 07/29/10 08:38:47

LST 512 Underway off Cape Hatteras
LST 512 Underway Back

This is the official Navy photo of the LST 512 that accompanied all press releases as it made its tour. According to the LST 512 History, it was taken as the ship was underway off Cape Hatteras.
The back side of this photo included information for the first stop on the tour after it was completely outfitted, in Detroit, MI. The date on the back is June 11, 1945, and the tour exhibit was officially opened on June 12, 1945.

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Subject: MARINES !


Author:
OLD SEA DOG
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Date Posted: 07/28/10 08:34:53

"Since I first joined the Marines, I have advocated aggressiveness in the field and constant offensive action. Hit quickly, hit hard, and keep right on hitting. Give the enemy no rest, no opportunity to consolidate his forces and hit back at you. This is the shortest road to victory in the type of island war the Marines had to fight and is most economical of lives in the long run."

Coral and Brass
General H. M. Smith USMC (Ret)
..................................................................
THIS PICTURE TELLS IT ALL, A MARINE PLATOON LEADER POINTS THE DIRECTION FOR HIS PLATOON TO ATTACK THE ENEMY. SAIPAN.

...................................................................

Ghost Trail, a charcoal and pastel sketch by Kerr Eby depicting a Marine patrol on Bougainville, 1944. US Navy Combat Art Collection.
.................................................................
THE U.S. MARINES "FIRST IN, LAST OUT"

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Subject: THE VETERAN + HIS FLAG ALWAYS WIN !


Author:
OLD SEA DOG
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Date Posted: 07/23/10 12:48:43

LIKE I SAID, THE VETERAN AND HIS FLAG ALWAYS WIN. THIS TIME THE MANAGER BACKED WAY DOWN AND WOUND UP KISSING THE VETERANS ASS !.
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Vietnam Veteran in Florida Wins Battle Over Display of U.S. Flag

A Florida Vietnam veteran who went to war with his apartment complex over the right to post an American flag in his window appears to have won a stars and stripes showdown. Carlisle Vereen, of Daytona Beach, told Central Florida News 13 that "patriotism" led him to tape the paper flag to the inside of his apartment window last Thanksgiving. No complaints were received at the time, he said. Joann Thompson, a manager at Manatee Bay Apartments, told FoxNews.com she gave Vereen a notice earlier this week indicating that the flag needed to be removed from the window within 24 hours or it would be disposed of by apartment officials.

The notice indicated that no signs were allowed on doors or windows, but Thompson said the flag -- which was originally made of paper -- had been replaced with a plastic version and is now in compliance with the complex's regulations. "The issue was that it was paper and all faded and torn," Thompson said. "We didn't want this to go this far. I understand why he got upset -- he's a veteran, he's very passionate. It was not my intention to upset him." Thompson said the apartment complex left a much larger flag made of cloth with a six-foot flagpole at his residence on Friday.

"He can move it if he wants to, or if he wants, he can put it on his patio," Thompson said. "Or, he can display both [flags]." Prior to Thompson's reconsideration, Vereen, who could not be reached for comment on Friday, said he hired an attorney and will dispute the order. "I fought for that flag," the Vietnam veteran CFNews13.com. "I've bled for that flag. My father fought for it, my brother fought for it and my son fought for it in Afghanistan and Iraq."

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Subject: Another Veteran + His Flag !


Author:
Old Sea Dog
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Date Posted: 07/23/10 07:42:53

HOW MANY TIMES HAVE WE SEEN THIS BEFORE, AND THE VETERAN ALWAYS WINS AND THE FLAG STAYS WHERE HE WANTS IT TO BE. ON THE INSIDE OF HIS WINDOW, WHAT THE HELL IS WRONG WITH SOME OF THESE IDIOTS OUT THERE, NO RESPECT FOR OUR FLAG OR OUR VETERANS. CAN I GET MY HANDS ON THE FOOL THAT IS RESPONSIBLE AND GIVE HIM A WHACK ?, I'D LOVE TO ! ?........................................................
Vietnam Veteran in Florida Reportedly Told to Remove U.S. Flag

Published July 23, 2010

A Vietnam veteran in Florida reportedly must remove an American flag from his apartment window or management officials will take it down for him. Carlisle Vereen, of Daytona Beach, told Central Florida News 13 that "patriotism" led him to tape the paper flag to the inside of his apartment window last Thanksgiving. No complaints were received at the time, he said. Officials at Manatee Bay Apartments, however, recently issued a notice to a "dumbfounded" Vereen indicating that the flag needed to be removed from the window within 24 hours or "they will be disposed of by Management," CFNews13.com reports.

The notice indicates that no signs are allowed on doors or windows. At least two of Vereen's neighbors also display flags in their apartments, but neither told CFNews13.com that they have received notices to remove them. Vereen, who could not be reached for comment on Friday, said he's hired an attorney and will dispute the order. "I fought for that flag," the Vietnam veteran told the website. "'I've bled for that flag. My father fought for it, my brother fought for it and my son fought for it in Afghanistan and Iraq." Since the flag is taped to the inside of his window, any management official who attempts to remove will have to enter Vereen's apartment. If that occurs, Vereen will consider to seek to file charges of breaking and entering.

"They may want to evict me after I�ve been here over 10 years, but I'll do that before I take that flag down," Vereen told the website. Several calls to Manatee Bay Apartments were not returned on Friday. A housekeeper at Vereen's apartment told FoxNews.com a management official visited the apartment Friday afternoon to offer a six-foot flagpole and flag for Vereen to fly on his lawn. "He's still probably not willing to remove the flag from the window," she told FoxNews.com. "He's really upset."

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