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LST SAILORS TALK DECK
WELCOME TO THE LST SAILORS TALK DECK.
Founded by our own Old Sea Dog

Subject: Solar Eclipse in Africa + Asia


Author:
Old Sea Dog
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Date Posted: 01/15/10 14:57:34



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Subject: New to Me


Author:
OSD
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Date Posted: 01/12/10 16:03:06


Leslie Howard (1893-1943) [The Petrified Forest (1936); "Ashley" in Gone With The Wind (1939)]. Howard and others died June 1, 1943, on a flight from Lisbon to London (KLM Royal Dutch Airlines/BOAC Flight 777) when their aircraft was shot down by a German Junkers Ju 88 over the Bay of Biscay. Howard had been engaged in secret war work and the Germans believed that Winston Churchill, who had been in Algiers, might also be on board. The Allies knew from Ultra that the plane was going to be shot down so Howard's life, as well as the others on board, were sacrificed to preserve the Allies' most important secret.

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Subject: Japanese Army Daily Schedule


Author:
Old Sea Dog
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Date Posted: 01/12/10 15:41:09

DAILY SCHEDULE

The Japanese used the following daily schedule during their occupation of Tulagi Island in May, 1942:

Daily schedule Hours Notes
.............................................................................................
Reveille ................................................ 0400
Morning worship begins......................0415 Respectful reading
End of worship .................................... 0440 of Imperial Mandate.
Exercise ...............................................0440
Breakfast ..............................................0500
Begin work ...........................................0630
Rest ......................................................0730
Resume previous tasks .....................0745
Rest ......................................................0845
Resume previous tasks .....................0900
Stop work ............................................1000 Sick call.
Begin daily care [of equipment].........1015
End daily care [of equipment]............1100
Lunch....................................................1130
Special course begins........................1430
Special course ends...........................1530
Supper..................................................1600
Begin work...........................................1700
End work..............................................1745
All hands get sleeping gear ready.....1900
Prepare for tour of inspection.............1915
Tour of inspection................................1930

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Subject: The mini sub visable + West Lock


Author:
Old Sea Dog
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Date Posted: 01/ 7/10 15:35:17


Captured Japanese two man submarine at Bellows Field, T.H. after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, Dec. 7, 1941.

This picture shows an IJN mini sub off Battleship row firing it's Longbow Torpedos (two visable wakes) at the West Virginia and the Oklahoma. Naval history should be rewritten to show that the West Virginia was hit by torpedos from an IJN mini sub.

When I reversed the colors of the picture, the mini sub can clearly be seen !. This sub escaped to the quiet area of West Lock and was scuttled by the two man crew.

Three years later the West Lock LST Disaster littered the bottom with debris from six sunken LSTs. When this debris was cleared, the remains of the mini sub along with remains of damaged landing craft were taken three miles outside Pearl Harbor and dumped in the ocean. The mini sub now lies at 1000 ft down, three miles outside Pearl Harbor. The remains of the two man crew are still inside the hull.

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Subject: Second larger flag was from LST 779


Author:
osd
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Date Posted: 01/11/10 16:50:18

Several hours later, an 8-foot-long battle ensign, obtained from tank landing ship LST-779, was raised, resulting in Associated Press photographer Joe Rosenthal's famous photograph of the flag raising. This photograph inspired the bronze monument to the Marine Corps by Felix de Welden located near Arlington National Cemetery.

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Subject: An interesting story...


Author:
SeaBat
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Date Posted: 01/11/10 05:51:02

http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20100110/sc_afp/australiajapanwwiihistoryship

Sad history that now may answer questions long asked.

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Subject: INTELLIGENCE BULLETIN MAGAZINES WWII


Author:
OLD SEA DOG
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Date Posted: 01/10/10 17:00:38


INTELLIGENCE BULLETIN MAGAZINES LINK
INTELLIGENCE BULLETIN MAGAZINES

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Subject: LST pictures


Author:
OSD
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Date Posted: 01/10/10 16:50:56

German Prisoners leaving the LST 47

Looks like 341 to me

Close, but still safe


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Subject: LST 764 at Iwo Jima


Author:
OSD
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Date Posted: 01/ 9/10 15:51:03

The 764 on the beach at Iwo Jima amid the damaged equipment.


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Subject: Just for OSD


Author:
SeaBat
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Date Posted: 01/ 9/10 14:47:12



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Subject: Nova Program "Killer Subs in Pearl Harbor"


Author:
Old Sea Dog
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Date Posted: 01/ 6/10 19:32:51

There is more to the story of the Pearl Harbor Attack. Japan had 5 small (80 ft.) Subs to sneak into Pearl Harbor. Four of the subs failed but Sub #5 did fire it's powerful Longbow torpedos at battleship row. What happened to sub #5 after it fled Pearl Harbor is covered in a Nova Program.
The link to the program page is Nova "Killer Subs"

This story evolves into the WestLoc LST Disaster and the final facts will surprise you. This is a great program.

Old Sea Dog

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Subject: aerial view of Pearl Harbor


Author:
Old Sea Dog
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Date Posted: 01/ 7/10 17:44:16

You can see West Lock going off to the left.


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Subject: Forum Counts as of today !


Author:
Old Sea Dog
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Date Posted: 01/ 7/10 19:13:11

Counter start date: Fri, Jan 31, 2003
Forum accesses since start date: 108163
Total forum accesses on the 1st: 107284
Days: 2533
Hits so-far this month: 879
Average hits per day: 42.70
Projected total hits this month:
((Count/day_of_month)*Total_days_this_month) ((879/8)*31) = 3406
.........................................
If the forum is getting 42.70 hits per day then we are a success and people are looking at the posts here. To have 879 visits so far this month is great !. Thank You to All for keeping things going here.

Old Sea Dog

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Subject: Texas Bowl


Author:
Paul Sullenberger
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Date Posted: 01/ 2/10 12:02:08

Navy Midshipmen 35, Missouri Tigers 13. Great season for the Academy and Coach Ken.
Earlier one of the sprots writers on Yahoo claimed that the reason Charlie Weis got fired was because Navy beat Notre Dame; claimed that it was the second time in 3 years that Notre Dame had been beaten by a team with "less talent."
I think what they did Thursday demonstrated a good deal of talent, and more importantly, CHARACTER on top of talent.

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Subject: A Special "Les Paul" Guitar !


Author:
old sea dog
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Date Posted: 01/ 9/10 10:49:23

I had to post this pic. of a custom made Les Paul Guitar.

old sea dog

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Subject: Japan's IJN I-400 Aircraft Carrier Submarines


Author:
Old Sea Dog
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Date Posted: 01/ 8/10 18:00:12


This is a picture of the IJN I-401, which was one of the largest Submarines ever built. The IJN submarine I-400 is among the most intriguing subs of World War II. Not only was it the largest submarine at 394' long and displaying 5,220 tons, the I-400 series also featured three advanced Aichi M6A1 Seiran fighter bomber aircraft, eight torpedo tubes, and enough conventional weaponry to qualify as a light destroyer. Then there is the I-400's distinctive appearance - bulging aircraft hanger bays protruding from the huge superstructure, and the offset conning tower. In addition there was a folding deck crane, snorkel rig, and radar. All in all the I-400 is a unique ship. It was an Aircraft Carrier Submarine, truly ahead of it's time.

A very accurate model of the I-401
..............................................................
The I-400 class submarine displaced 6,500 tons (5,900 tonnes) and was over 400 ft (120 m) long, three times the size of ordinary submarines. It had a figure-eight hull shape for additional strength to handle the on-deck hangar for housing the three Aichi M6A Seiran aircraft. In addition, it had four anti-aircraft guns and a large deck gun as well as eight torpedo tubes from which they could fire the Long Lance - the largest, longest ranged and most deadly torpedo in use at the time.

Three of the Sen Toku were built, the I-400, I-401, and I-402. Each had four 3,000 hp (2.2 MW) engines and enough fuel to go around the world 1½ times, more than enough to reach the United States from either direction.

The submarines were also able to carry three Sei ran aircraft (the Aichi M6A), each carrying a 1,760 lb (800 kg) bomb 650 mi (1,050 km) at 360 mph (580 km/h). Its name was combination of sei ("clear sky") and ran ("storm"), literally "storm out of a clear sky," because the Americans would not know they were coming. It had a wing span of 40 ft (12 m) and a length of 38 ft (11.6 m). To fit the aircraft into the hangar, the wings of the aircraft were folded back, the horizontal stabilizers folded down, and the top of the vertical stabilizer folded over so the overall profile of the aircraft was within the diameter of its propeller. A crew of four could prepare and get all three airborne in 45 minutes, launching them with a 120 ft (37 m) catapult on the fore deck of the giant submarine.

In many ways H.I.J.M.S. I-400 was decades ahead of her time. She was the world's largest submarine, with a length of 400 feet and a surfaced displacement of 3,530 tons. Above her main deck rose a 115 foot long, 12 foot diameter, hangar housing three torpedo-bombers. These floatplanes were rolled out through a massive hydraulic door onto an 85 foot pneumatic catapult, where they were rigged for flight, fueled, armed, launched, and, after landing alongside, lifted back aboard with a powerful hydraulic crane. The I-400 was equipped with a snorkel, radar, radar detectors, and capacious fuel tanks that gave her a range of 37,500 miles: one and a half times around the world. She was armed with eight torpedo tubes, a 5.5 inch 50 caliber deck gun, a bridge 25mm antiaircraft gun, and three triple 25mm A/A mounts atop her hangar. The advent of guided missiles and atomic bombs transformed her from an overspecialized undersea dinosaur to a menacing strategic threat. Like Germany's Type XXI U-boat she was too late to influence World War II.



After the War:
When the unusual boats were brought alongside the submarine tender U.S.S. Proteus (AS-19) off Yokosuka Commander William B. "Barney" Sieglaff was named skipper of the I-400 prize crew, Hi Cassedy was given I-401, and I-14 was given to Commander John S. "Junior" McCain, son of the carrier task force commander Vice Admiral John S. "Slew" McCain (and father of Arizona Senator John S. McCain, III).

I-400's first American skipper, Barney Sieglaff, was highly regarded for his outstanding war patrols in the U.S.S. Tautog (SS-199).


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Subject: Search Engine with no Tracking Record !


Author:
Old Sea Dog
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Date Posted: 01/ 6/10 11:45:10

Most Search Engines record your searches, and some give that information to the Government, but there is one that does not do that. It does not even record your IP Address !, that Search Engine is Startpage.com, and here is a link to it.
STARTPAGE.COM
I think it's a good idea !.
Old Sea Dog

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Subject: Safety pin not clothes pin


Author:
old sea dog
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Date Posted: 01/ 6/10 09:09:22

My mind must be slipping, the light had a large safety pin made of brass, very heavy duty. I think you screwed on the lens tight to turn it on. unless my mind is slipping again.
old sea dog

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Subject: LST 376 SUNK IN ENGLISH CHANNEL


Author:
OLD SEA DOG
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Date Posted: 01/ 6/10 05:33:57

LST-376
Awards, Citations and Campaign Ribbons
American Campaign Medal European
Africa-Middle East Campaign Medal (3)
World War II Victory Medal
.........................................................
# LST-1 Class Tank Landing Ship Laid down, 25 November 1942, at Bethlehem Steel Co., Quincy, MA.
# Launched, 1 February 1943
# Commissioned USS LST-376, 5 February 1943
# During World War II LST-376 was assigned to the European Theater and participated in the following campaigns:
Europe
Sicilian occupation, July 1943
Invasion of Normandy, June 1944
Salerno landings, September 1943 .

# LST-376 was torpedoed and sunk by a German surface craft in the English Channel, 9 June 1944
# Struck from the Naval Register, 28 June 1944
# LST-376 earned three battle stars for World War II service

Posted by Cyril M. Pombier on 11/14/2005, 4:14 pm, in reply to "LST 376"
67.172.89.155
My brother, Edward Pombier served as a Medic [Pharmacy mate 3rd class]on LST 376 that was sunk on the way back to Plymouth in the English Channel. He and two crew were able to spend the night near the "fantail stabilizer". They had been ordered to "abandon ship" but since it was night, and COLD, they waited for almost dawn when the LST was shifting as if sinking. They heard a ship near, slid into the water and slid into the water. The life vests were equipped with whistle and small flashlights to signal. They were picked up by an English Destroyer. Eddie believes the two with him were, Ed [P] Finkelstine from [sp] Pantucket,RI and "Smite" Smith.

Eddie told me, on a tape I made about 20 years ago.
[His schedule included:]

Plymouth, welded additional tracks into cargo area, racks for wounded before port. Eddie told me they carried a umber of Combat engineers.]
Left June 5th, returned because of weather.
Left June 5th, evening/morning?
Landed on Omaha Beach, Red Dog area. Unloaded supplies and filled boat with wounded. " Eddie earlier told about small boats rowed to-from beach to get wounded,but did not include this item in this recording.
Filled , started back to Plymouth.
Were torpedoed by a German S boat in the channel.
Eddie was taking a cigarette break on deck when they were hit. He had been working with a 3 person surgical unit. They were climbing towards the deck when an officer closed the hatch. At one time [Not on this tape] he told me he was threatened by a side-arm for trying to open the hatch. The same officer had told them to go into the water when he decided to stay on the LST.
Eddie was given "survivors leave" to return home. He was transferred into the Marines as a Medic for them. He served during the cleanup period at Siapan
and with the Second Marines with the invasion of [sp] Iwo Jema. I think on a LSTH, then with a unit on the island.

Eddie reenlisted in the Army after a year at home after the war. He transferred to the Airforce after their split with the Army, so he served for 26 years in with all four branches...not many have done this!

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Subject: CAROLINAS LST STATE CHAPTER BEACH BASH


Author:
Buddy LST 1126
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Date Posted: 01/ 5/10 05:54:45

The Carolinas State LST Chapter annual Reunion has been scheduled. The Beach Bash XV will again be held at the Springmaid Resorts in Myrtle Beach, SC during May 3, 4, 5, 2010. We will have an interesting guest speaker on Tuesday morning, munch and mingle in the Hospitality Room that afternoon, and then have a dinner at the famous J. Edwards Restaurant. Attendees will be seeing a live show at The Palace Theater on Wednesday and then shuttled over to The Liberty Steak and Ale Restaurant for lunch. The weather is expected to be in the low 70’s during the event. Anyone wishing to fish, play golf of just shop the new malls will have great weather and facilities for that. The view of the Blue Atlantic will be available from all rooms and the sight of the sun coming up is refreshing.

Membership is only $15.00 a year and is available to any honorably discharged veteran or person still serving in any branch of service. For information contact Buddy at 843-902-7445 or Email at Buddy@LST1126.com.

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Subject: LST 788 photo


Author:
old sea dog
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Date Posted: 01/ 3/10 19:25:23


LST-788, -760, -72k, and LSM-264 land supplies through the debris of an assault beach on Iwo Jima, February 1945. The ships keep their propellers turning over to hold themselves in position. In the water are a DUKW and an LCPR; in the surf and on the beach are LVT's, DUKW's, trucks, bulldozers, and a crawler crane. Trucks at the right are towing 105mm howitzers inland from LST-724. A successful amphibious operation is the combined work of many men, using many types of ships, weapons, and vehicles.

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Subject: MAPS USED IN WWII


Author:
OLD SEA DOG
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Date Posted: 12/28/09 07:37:25



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Subject: Re: A Big Thank You


Author:
Buddy LST 1126
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Date Posted: 12/26/09 03:06:27

Matt, it's always great to hear that those searching for assistance, inquiring about their ship, their dad's or uncle's or grandpa's ship had some good luck with information they received here on these discussion pages. We don't always hear back, so thanks for the post.

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Subject: More info about LST 129


Author:
OSD
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Date Posted: 10/27/09 05:57:38

On 2 October, while unloading cargo on Peleliu despite rough seas and a 45-knot wind, LST-278 collided with LST-129 and suffered severe damage. After a month's salvage operations, she was retracted on 2 November. However, she suffered more severe damage during hurricane winds a week later. She served as a port post office at Kossol Roads from 13 to 28 November when LST-129 relieved her of the duty. Stripping operations continued until LST-278 was decommissioned on 22 January 1945, two days after she had been struck from the Navy list. Restored to the Navy list on 8 February, the ship was recommissioned on the 14th; and placed in service the following day. Named Seaward and reclassified IX-209 on the 17th, the ship served as a barracks and post office at Ulithi. The former LST was declared in excess of the Navy's needs and destroyed on 16 October 1946. She was struck from the Navy list on 22 May 1947.

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Subject: STORM MAP


Author:
OLD SEA DOG
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Date Posted: 12/18/09 17:40:56



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Subject: LST 126 (Merry Christmas)


Author:
OLD SEA DOG
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Date Posted: 12/22/09 14:20:25


USS LST-126 beached at Leyte in October 1944

Overhead view of USS LST-126 two other LSTs and an LCT (Mark 5) beached at Leyte in October 1944
.............................................
LST-126 was laid down on 11 June 1943 at Evansville, Ind., by the Missouri Valley Bridge & Iron Co.; launched on 28 August 1943; sponsored by Mrs. Sam B. Storm; and commissioned on 2 October 1943, Lt. M. A. Cassell in command.

During World War II, LST-126 was assigned to the Asiatic-Pacific theater and participated in the following operations:

Marshall Islands operation:

(a) Occupation of Kwajalein and Majuro Atolls
—January and February 1944

Marianas operation:

(a) Capture and occupation of Saipan
—June 1944

Leyte landings
—October 1944

Upon her return to the United States, the ship was decommissioned on 17 June 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 23 June 1947. On 14 June 1948, she was sold to the Oil Transport Co., of New Orleans, La., for conversion to merchant service.

LST-126 earned three battle stars for World War II service.

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Subject: Link to story about the LST 126 at Westloc


Author:
Old Sea Dog
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Date Posted: 12/22/09 14:53:47

A link to a bit of history of the LST 126 at Westloc and beyond. It's at LST 126 HISTORY
I tested it and it works fine, just click on the highlighted text. Old Sea Dog

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Subject: list of typical stores brought on board


Author:
Old Sea Dog
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Date Posted: 12/18/09 17:54:05

The Administrative Log lists some of the stores which were taken aboard in preparation for an LST trip. The log entry below is for July 8, 1943:
Potatoes, Irish -- 1500 lbs.
Orange juice -- 252 qts.
Onions, dry -- 400 lbs.
Asparagus -- 314 lbs.
Lettuce -- 59 lbs.
Beans, navy -- 300 lbs.
Celery -- 56 lbs.
Beans, string -- 480 lbs.
Carrots -- 312 lbs.
Carrots, can. -- 397 lbs.
Tomatoes -- 33 lbs.
Corn, canned -- 300 lbs.
Pineapple juice -- 252 qts.
Cherries, can. -- 400 lbs.
Potatoes, canned -- 261 lbs.
Coffee, ground -- 500 lbs.
Tomatoes, canned 780 lbs.
Catsup, tomato -- 90 gal.
Vinegar -- 8 gal.
Bacon -- 217 lbs.
Milk, evaporated -- 100l lbs.
Beef -- 3976 lbs.
Chili con came -- 4~8 lbs.
Butter -- 40 lbs.
Mix, ice cream -- 255 lbs.
Cheese -- 270 lbs.
Eggs, powdered -- 198 lbs.
Eggs, fresh -- 300 lbs.
Syrup, canned -- 9 gal.
Ham, canned -- 314 lbs.
Spaghetti -- 280 lbs.
Pork, uncured -- 425 lbs.
Oil, salad -- 30 gal.
Pork, loin -- 501 lbs.
Oats, rolled -- 200 lbs.
Pork, sausage -- 300 lbs.

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Subject: New Movies added at WORLD WAR TWO MOVIES


Author:
OLD SEA DOG
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Date Posted: 12/18/09 19:32:04

I HAVE ADDED NEW WWII FOOTAGE AT THE WORLD WAR TWO MOVIES

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Subject: Page of Navy Amphibious Links


Author:
Old Sea Dog
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Date Posted: 12/18/09 17:46:01

NAVY AMPHIBIOUS LINKS

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Subject: LSTS HAD HEROS TOO


Author:
OLD SEA DOG
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Date Posted: 12/16/09 16:35:28

Congressional Medal of Honor
Awarded Posthumously
JOHNNIE DAVID HUTCHINS

Rank and organization: Seaman First Class, U.S. Naval Reserve.
Place and date: On board USS LST (Landing Ship, Tank) 473 during the assault on Lae, New Guinea, 4 September 1943.
Born: 4 August 1922, Weimer, Texas.
Accredited to: Texas.

As the ship on which Hutchins was stationed approached the enemy-occupied beach under a veritable hail of fire from Japanese shore batteries and aerial bombardment, a hostile torpedo pierced the surf and bore down upon the vessel with deadly accuracy. In the tense split seconds before the helmsman could steer clear of the threatening missile, a bomb struck the pilot house, dislodged him from his station, and left the stricken ship helplessly exposed. Fully aware of the dire peril of the situation, Hutchins, although mortally wounded by the shattering explosion, quickly grasped the wheel and exhausted the last of his strength in maneuvering the vessel clear of the advancing torpedo. Still clinging to the helm, he eventually succumbed to his injuries, his final thoughts concerned only with the safety of his ship, his final efforts expended toward the security of his mission. He gallantly gave his life in the service of his country.

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Subject: James Arness, WWII Purple Heart and More


Author:
Old Sea Dog
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Date Posted: 12/16/09 16:26:01


James Arness (1923-Jun 26, 2009 ) [Island in the Sky (1953); tv Gunsmoke (1955-1975)]. Served in the U.S. Army during WW II and was severely wounded in the Battle of Anzio, leading to a lifelong limp. His military awards and medals include: the Bronze Star; the Purple Heart; the European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal with three bronze star devices; World War II Victory Medal; and the Combat Infantryman's Badge.

WELL DONE MARSHALL DILLON !

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Subject: lots of pictures on the web


Author:
Old Sea Dog
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Date Posted: 12/16/09 15:51:25

lots of pictures of the Asheville on the web !.
Old Sea Dog

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Subject: USS ASHEVILLE


Author:
OLD SEA DOG
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Date Posted: 12/13/09 18:22:49


On 1 March 1942, Vice Admiral William A. Glassford, Commander, Southwest Pacific Force (formerly the US Asiatic Fleet), ordered all of the remaining American warships to retreat to Australia. The Asheville, under the command of Lt. Jacob W. Britt, left Tjilatjap on 1 March 1942 and was headed for Fremantle, Australia. At 0615 on 2 March, the gunboat Tulsa (ironically the sister ship to the Asheville) sighted a ship and identified her as the Asheville. On 3 March the Asheville radioed that it was “being attacked” about 300 miles south of Java. The radio transmission was received by the minesweeper USS Whippoorwill (AM-35). The ship turned and headed towards the Asheville’s position, which was some 90 miles away. But when a second radio transmission was received by the Whippoorwill stating that the Asheville was being attacked by a surface vessel, the captain of the minesweeper, Lt. Commander Charles R. Ferriter, concluded that, “Any surface vessel that could successfully attack the Asheville would be too much” for his own poorly-armed minesweeper, so he ordered his ship to continue its voyage to Australia. The Asheville was never heard from again.

The Asheville was presumed lost and was stricken from the Navy list on 8 May 1942. It wasn’t until after World War II that the US Navy found out what had happened to the Asheville. A survivor of the heavy cruiser Houston (CA-30) stated that he had met in a Japanese prison camp 18-year-old Fireman 1st Class Fred L. Brown, who had been in the Asheville’s fireroom when a Japanese surface force under Vice Admiral Kondo Nobutake had attacked the ship on 3 March 1942. The Japanese destroyers Arashi and Nowaki attacked the Asheville and pummeled her with numerous hits, destroying the bridge and the forecastle. When Brown reached topside to abandon ship, most of the men he saw on deck were dead. Brown jumped in the water and a sailor on one of the Japanese destroyers threw him a line, which Brown held on to. He was then pulled on board the ship. Fred Brown was put into a Japanese prison camp, but the Asheville’s only survivor died in captivity on 18 March 1945.

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Subject: Landing Markers WWII


Author:
Old Sea Dog
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Date Posted: 12/15/09 16:03:15



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Subject: HUGS TO YOU, Old Sea Dog


Author:
SeaBat
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Date Posted: 12/11/09 14:54:26

I wanted to post this so you would be sure to see it.

Heartfelt thanks to you for posting the Okinawa film footage link. If you almost fell out of your chair, you can imagine how I felt!!! I had never seen this footage and it didn't take long for me to share it with the shipmates of 125 that are on line. They will be absolutely thrilled.

Thanks for making their day... month... year!!! You sure made mine!

It just goes to prove, that even when you think you've found all there is... something else will pop up. (Especially when you have an Old Sea Dog looking for information for you!)

HUGS.. and more HUGS!!! I'll be smiling for weeks on this one!

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Subject: USS Asheville lost 1942


Author:
PFF
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Date Posted: 12/13/09 09:25:53

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Asheville_(PG-21)
Of 159 crew---158 killed+ 1 died POW camp

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Subject: Honda Point shipwrecks


Author:
OSD
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Date Posted: 08/14/09 19:04:49

THE HONDA POINT DISASTER

The fourteen ships of Destroyer Squadron 11 (DESRON 11) made their way south from San Francisco Bay to San Diego Bay in the late summer of 1923. The squadron was led by Commodore Edward H. Watson, on the flagship leading the squadron. All were Clemson-class destroyers, less than five years old. The ships turned east to course 095, supposedly into the Santa Barbara Channel, at 21:00.

The ships were navigating by dead reckoning, estimating their position by their heading and speed, as measured by propeller turns. At the time radio navigational aids were new and not completely trusted. Delphy was equipped with a radio navigational receiver, but ignored the bearings, believing them to be erroneous. No effort was made to take soundings or depth measurements. These operations were not performed due to the need to slow the ships to take readings. The ships were performing an exercise that simulated wartime conditions, hence the decision not to slow down. In this case, the dead reckoning was wrong and the mistake fatal.

Earlier the same day, the mail steamship Cuba ran aground nearby. Some attributed these incidents in the Santa Barbara Channel to unusual currents caused by the Tokyo earthquake of the previous week.

The lost ships were:

* USS Delphy (DD-261) was the flagship in the column. She ran aground on the shore at 20 knots (37 km/h). After running aground, she sounded her siren. The siren alerted some of the later ships in the column, helping them avoid the tragedy. Three men died. There was one civilian aboard Delphy. Eugene Dooman, a Japan expert with the State Department, was aboard as a guest of Captain Watson; they had first met in Japan.
* USS S. P. Lee (DD-310) was following a few hundred yards behind. She saw Delphy suddenly stop, and turned to port (left) in response. She ran into the coast.
* USS Young (DD-312) made no move to turn. She tore her hull open on submerged rocks. The water rushed in, and capsized her onto her starboard (right) side within minutes. Twenty men died.
* USS Woodbury (DD-309) turned to starboard, but ran into an offshore rock.
* USS Nicholas (DD-311) turned to port and also hit a rocky outcropping.
* USS Fuller (DD-297) piled up next to Woodbury.
* USS Chauncey (DD-296) made an attempt to rescue sailors atop the capsized Young. She ran aground nearby.

Light damage was recorded by:

* USS Farragut (DD-300) ran aground, but was able to extricate herself. She was not lost.
* USS Somers (DD-301) was lightly damaged.

The remaining five avoided the rocks:

* USS Percival (DD-298)
* USS Kennedy (DD-306)
* USS Paul Hamilton (DD-307)
* USS Stoddert (DD-302)
* USS Thompson (DD-305)

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Subject: Kamakaze close up !


Author:
OSD
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Date Posted: 10/27/09 08:51:48



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Subject: Navy 17, Army 3


Author:
Paul Sullenberger
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Date Posted: 12/13/09 05:58:40

8 years in a row. 15 straight against service academies, 7 consecutive C in C's Trophy, 7th straight winning season, 7th straight bowl game appearance. Ricky Dobbs now holds the single season record for rushing TD's scored by a QB, passing Tim Tebow on the list.
The best part, the mutual respect shown by the teams, and knowing that these fine young men will one day be our nation's leaders. Coach Ken becomes the first coach in Navy history to win the Army-Navy game in both of his first 2 years.

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Subject: newspaper


Author:
Old Sea Dog
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Date Posted: 12/ 7/09 17:56:44



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Subject: the offending flagpole


Author:
OSD
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Date Posted: 12/ 3/09 18:18:44


LOOKS REAL GOOD TO ME. OSD

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Subject: Re: The Law about Displaying the Flag


Author:
Paul Sullenberger
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Date Posted: 12/ 5/09 15:16:10

I would also argue that the manner in which a flag is displayed constitutes an exercise in Free Speeech. I'd think that if a court can rule that burning the flag is free speech, it would also rule that flying the flag in a particular manner is also free speech.
If the HOA wants to limit the rights of Americans to free speech (including other flags they don't want displayed) then they have identified themselves as domestic enemies of the Constitution of the United States.
I recall taking an oath to support and defend the Constitution against such people.

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Subject: The Law about Displaying the Flag


Author:
OSD
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Date Posted: 12/ 3/09 17:27:19

There is a Law… a US PUBLIC LAW. PUBLIC LAW 109–243—JULY 24, 2006, which protects the Col’s right to display his flag. Hence, it’s title: An Act To ensure that the right of an individual to display the flag of the United States on residential property not be abridged. or short title: ‘‘Freedom to Display the American
Flag Act of 2005’’.

It states:SEC. 3. RIGHT TO DISPLAY THE FLAG OF THE UNITED STATES. A condominium association, cooperative association, or residential real estate management association may not adopt or enforce any policy, or enter into any agreement, that would restrict or prevent a member of the association from displaying the flag of the United States on residential property within the association
with respect to which such member has a separate ownership
interest or a right to exclusive possession or use.

There is a limitation in the section below, which reads: “SEC. 4. LIMITATIONS.
Nothing in this Act shall be considered to permit any display
or use that is inconsistent with—
...
(2) any reasonable restriction pertaining to the time, place, or manner of displaying the flag of the United States necessary to protect a substantial interest of the condominium association, cooperative association, or residential real estate management association. “

HOWEVER… the association would have to PROVE that restricting the “manner of his display” i.e. the flagpole was indeed “necessary to protect a substantial interest” of theirs. WHAT substantial interest could they possibly have that could be harmed by a flagpole, with a flag of the US on it!?!

NONE!

which means, folks, that the people breaking the LAW, are the people of the HOA. NOT the Col.

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Subject: Look at his record !


Author:
OSD
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Date Posted: 12/ 3/09 13:49:47


The President of the United States
in the name of The Congress
takes pleasure in presenting the
Medal of Honor
to

BARFOOT, VAN T.

Rank and organization: Second Lieutenant, U.S. Army, 157th Infantry, 45th Infantry Division.
Place and date: Near Carano, Italy, 23 May 1944.
Entered service at: Carthage, Miss.
Birth: Edinburg, Miss. G.O.
No.: 79, 4 October 1944.

Citation:
For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of life above and beyond the call of duty on 23 May 1944, near Carano, Italy. With his platoon heavily engaged during an assault against forces well entrenched on commanding ground, 2d Lt. Barfoot (then Tech. Sgt.) moved off alone upon the enemy left flank. He crawled to the proximity of 1 machinegun nest and made a direct hit on it with a hand grenade, killing 2 and wounding 3 Germans. He continued along the German defense line to another machinegun emplacement, and with his tommygun killed 2 and captured 3 soldiers. Members of another enemy machinegun crew then abandoned their position and gave themselves up to Sgt. Barfoot. Leaving the prisoners for his support squad to pick up, he proceeded to mop up positions in the immediate area, capturing more prisoners and bringing his total count to 17. Later that day, after he had reorganized his men and consolidated the newly captured ground, the enemy launched a fierce armored counterattack directly at his platoon positions. Securing a bazooka, Sgt. Barfoot took up an exposed position directly in front of 3 advancing Mark VI tanks. From a distance of 75 yards his first shot destroyed the track of the leading tank, effectively disabling it, while the other 2 changed direction toward the flank. As the crew of the disabled tank dismounted, Sgt. Barfoot killed 3 of them with his tommygun. He continued onward into enemy terrain and destroyed a recently abandoned German fieldpiece with a demolition charge placed in the breech. While returning to his platoon position, Sgt. Barfoot, though greatly fatigued by his Herculean efforts, assisted 2 of his seriously wounded men 1,700 yards to a position of safety. Sgt. Barfoot's extraordinary heroism, demonstration of magnificent valor, and aggressive determination in the face of pointblank fire are a perpetual inspiration to his fellow soldiers.

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Subject: more info


Author:
OSD
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Date Posted: 12/ 3/09 14:04:53

PRESIDENT:
GLENN WILSON
11800 N Downs Sq
Henrico, VA 23238-3474
(804) 741-9160

DIRECTOR:
Evelyn L Wilson
(Address same as Glenn Wilson)

TREASURER:
Martha Middleton
11808 Rochampton Square
Richmond, VA 23238

LAW FIRM REPRESENTING THE HOA
Coates & Davenport
5206 Markel Road, Suite 200
Richmond VA 23230
Toll Free: (800) 450-8311
Local Phone: (804) 285-7000
General Fax: (804) 285-2849
Real Estate Fax: (804) 285-3426
http://www.coateslaw.com

Lawyer assigned to the case:
http://www.coateslaw.com/Bio/AlexandraBowen.asp
Alexandra “Sandra” D. Bowen
5206 Markel Rd
Richmond, VA 23230
804-285-7000

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Subject: More


Author:
OSD
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Date Posted: 12/ 3/09 13:57:44

The HOA is fighting a federal act. Where is the U.S. Attn. General ?
Here’s the text
…………………………………………………………………………………
The Freedom to Display the American Flag Act of 200556 prohibits a
condominium, cooperative, or real estate management association from adopting or
enforcing any policy or agreement that would restrict or prevent a member of the
association from displaying the flag in accordance with the Federal Flag Code on
residential property to which the member has a separate ownership interest.
..................................................
Here is the info on the HOA. CALL / WRITE A LETTER / HELP THIS Veteran out…………………………………
SUSSEX SQUARE SERVICE HOA at 804-740-8795. Sussex Square Services is the HOA. Here are the officers per public records: GLENN WILSON PRESIDENT ...
GLENN WILSON
11800 N Downs Sq
Henrico, VA 23238-3474
(804) 741-9160
,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,

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Subject: HERE WE GO AGAIN


Author:
OSD
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Date Posted: 12/ 3/09 10:21:29

A veteran of three wars who was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor is now facing an unlikely enemy — his neighbors. Col. Van T. Barfoot, 90, has raised the Stars and Stripes every day at sunrise and lowered them every day at sunset since he served in the U.S. Army. But on Tuesday he received a letter from the law firm that represents his homeowners' association, ordering him to remove the flagpole from his Richmond, Va. yard by 5 p.m. on Friday or face "legal action."

The homoeowners' association at Sussex Square community told Barfoot that the freestanding, 21-foot flagpole that he put up in September violates the neighborhood's aesthetic guidelines. Barfoot had sought permission to install the pole shortly after he moved into the community — a complex of townhouses where the grounds are community property — last June. The board denied his request in July. But Barfoot and his family say there is no provision in Sussex Square's rules that forbids erecting flagpoles. And for Barfoot, that's a cause worth fighting for.

"There's never been a day in my life or a place I've lived in my life that you couldn't fly the American flag," Barfoot said in an interview with the Richmond Times-Dispatch. In a statement released last night, the association sought to defend its position against a growing chorus of outrage. "This is not about the American flag. This is about a flagpole," reads the statement from the association, which insists that Barfoot directly violated its board's July ruling. "Col. Barfoot is free to display the American flag in conformity with the neighborhood rules and restrictions. We are hopeful that Col. Barfoot will comply."

The statement reminded the public that many American flags hang from homes in the Sussex Square community, and that the board members object only to Barfoot's freestanding flagpole. But Barfoot says he has always flown the flag from a height: "Where I've been, fighting wars ... military installations, parades, everything else, the flag is vertical. And I've done it that way since I was in the Army," Barfoot told the paper.

Barfoot is one of the country's last living World War II veterans who received the Medal of Honor. He also served in the Korean War and the Vietnam War and earned a Purple Heart. In WWII, Barfoot showed his mettle in Carano, Italy, where he single-handedly destroyed a set of German machine gun nests, killed eight enemy soldiers, took 17 prisoners and stared down a tank before destroying it and killing its crew — all in a single day. Exhausted by his herculean efforts, he still managed to move two of his wounded men 1,700 yards to safety.

"Sgt. Barfoot's extraordinary heroism, demonstration of magnificent valor, and aggressive determination in the face of pointblank fire are a perpetual inspiration to his fellow soldiers," reads the official citation for his Medal of Honor. Barfoot's resolve is now once again being tested. "I've flown the flag at my home as long as I can remember," said Barfoot, who lived in rural Amelia County before moving to suburban Richmond. "This is the first time in the last 36 years that I've been unable to put my flag up on the same pole, the same staff and take it down when it's time to come down.

"I don't have any qualms with [the board's] authority, but the thing about it is that I cannot get enough conversation out of them where we can try to work out a solution," Barfoot said. Neighbors largely have expressed their support, but he realizes that ultimately it's up to the nine-member association board whether to grant an exception to the rules. "Emotional torture is what they've done to my father," said his daughter, Margaret Nicholls. "He has lost sleep, he worries about it constantly. He just doesn't understand. He thinks that if it's on his property they can't tell him what to do."

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Subject: "play it sam, play "as time goes by".


Author:
OSD
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Date Posted: 12/ 3/09 06:33:32



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Subject: NEW FORUM FOR WWII VIDEO + MOVIES


Author:
OSD
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Date Posted: 12/ 2/09 16:24:41

I have set up a forum to post WWII video and movies, I hope you find it interesting. I will post the best video I can find. You will find it at WORLD WAR TWO VIDEO AND MOVIES

OLD SEA DOG

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Subject: Seabat: The 125 on this video


Author:
Old Sea Dog
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Date Posted: 12/ 1/09 17:21:52

Seabat: There is footage of the LST 125 in this video. When I saw it I just about fell out of my chair. Enjoy.


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Subject: Okinawa Landing Beach


Author:
Old Sea Dog
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Date Posted: 11/27/09 19:04:44

This is an aerial view of Okinawa. We know that the LST 870 was at Okinawa, so one of the T's on the beach is the 870, we can not tell which one it is.


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Subject: An amazing french weapon (snicker)


Author:
OSD
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Date Posted: 11/24/09 19:05:39



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Subject: new project at Tenneco


Author:
OSD
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Date Posted: 11/27/09 17:37:30



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Subject: LST 870 INFO


Author:
OLD SEA DOG
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Date Posted: 11/26/09 17:32:32

HERE IS WHAT I HAVE FOUND SO FAR, I could find only one picture.

THIS IS THE LOCATION
http://pictopia.com/perl/get_image?provider_id=319&size=550x550_mb&ptp_photo_id=314269
........................................................
NOT A LOT OF HISTORY ON THE 870.
......................................................................
LST-780
LST-780 was laid down on 28 May 1944 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp.; launched on 10 July 1944; sponsored by Miss Anna May Ries; and commissioned on 7 August 1944, Lit. Theodore B. Clark in command.

During World War II, LST-780 was assigned to the Asiatic-Pacific theater and participated in the assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto in March and April 1945.

Following the war, she performed occupation duty in the Far East until mid-September 1945. She returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 13 June 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 31 July that same year. On 27 October 1947, the ship was sold to the Moore Drydock Co., Oakland, Calif., for scrapping.



LST-780 earned one battle star for World War II service.

I hope this helps. Old Sea Dog

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Subject: Looking for information/photos of LST-870.


Author:
Matt VanderHulst
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Date Posted: 11/26/09 12:27:13

Hello everyone. My grandfather served on LST-870 and for Christmas this year, we were hoping to get a photo of his ship for him and frame it. Unforunately we are having difficulty obtaining such a photo. If you or anyone you know could assist in this matter it would be greatly appreciated. Thank you. My email is stryker_4_life@yahoo.com

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Subject: Re: LST 6 and LST 870


Author:
Matt VanderHulst
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Date Posted: 11/26/09 12:23:14

Dan-

I understand this is an extremly old thread but I'm hoping you might see it anyways. My grandfather served on LST-870 and for Christmas this year, we were hoping to get a photo of his ship for him and frame it. Unforunately we are having difficulty obtaining such a photo. If you or anyone you know could assist in this matter it would be greatly appreciated. Thank you. My email is stryker_4_life@yahoo.com

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Subject: Linked in many ways...


Author:
SeaBat
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Date Posted: 11/23/09 13:38:38

Photobucket
Petty Officers Andrew Boyles (Prescott AZ) and Phillip Evans (Charlotte NC) hold photo of LST-325 at Normandy June 12, 1944
USS New York New York City November 9, 2009


Photobucket
Petty Officers Phillip Evans (Charlotte NC) and Andrew Boyles (Prescott AZ) hold "Gator Navy" DVD
USS New York New York City November 9, 2009

Many thanks to Susan Bednarczyk for sharing the photos with us!

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Subject: For Jesse


Author:
Old Sea Dog
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Date Posted: 11/20/09 09:52:30

LST-482 LST-482 was laid down on 14 September 1942 at Richmond, Calif., by Kaiser, Inc.; launched on 17 December 1942; and commissioned on 20 March 1943, Lt. R. L. Eddy, USNR, in command.
During World War II, LST-482 was assigned to the Asiatic-Pacific theater and participated in the following operations:
Gilbert Islands operation—November and December 1943 Occupation of Kwajalein and Majuro Atolls—
January and February 1944 Hollandia operation—
April 1944 Capture and occupation of Guam—
July 1944 Leyte landings—
October 1944 Lingayen Gulf landing—
January 1945 Following the war, LST-482 was redesignated LSTH-482 on 15 September 1945. She performed occupation duty in the Far East in November and December 1945. Upon her return to the United States, she was decommissioned on 23 February 1946 and redesignated LST-482 on 6 March 1952. The tank landing ship was subsequently named Branch County (LST-482) on 1 July 1955 after a county in Michigan. Her name was struck from the Navy list on 11 August 1955. In early March 1956, the ship was sunk by naval gunfire and submarine-launched torpedoes in an exercise off San Diego, Calif.

LST-482 earned six battle stars for World War II service.

The LST 482 at the dock in the background

Some of the crew,
1942 MM Rotondo Dominick Palisade Park NJ
1943 BM Mackrell Paul Olyphant PA Email
1943 BM Mackrell Paul (Shorty) Hagerstown MD
1943 BM Williams John Fayetteville TN
1943 MM Cutshall Louis Cedar Falls IA
1943 PM Scott Luther Dubois PA
1944 AS Hopkins James Claypool IN
1944 SM Aregoni Arthur Caspian MI
1945 RD Sauter Harry Grandview IN

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Subject: LST 482 CONTACT


Author:
OLD SEA DOG
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Date Posted: 11/22/09 15:46:38

LST 482
Mr. Bill Hawkins 602-482-1808
Phoenix AZ
A MEMBER OF THE LST ASSOCIATION

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Subject: A Question ?


Author:
OSD
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Date Posted: 10/28/09 07:09:05

WHY SHOULD I BOTHER ?

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Subject: lst 482


Author:
jesse hunt
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Date Posted: 11/19/09 12:03:15

Hello my name is Jesse Hunt my grandfather was on LST 482 I was wondering if any one would have any information on that ship and hopefully some pictuers my grandfathers name was Fred Lyle Hunt any information would be extremely helpful
thank you
Jesse Hunt

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Subject: A SAILORS POEM !


Author:
OLD SEA DOG
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Date Posted: 11/20/09 19:36:43

THE OLD OUTFIT

"Written By a World War Two Sailor."

Come gather round me lads and I'll tell you a thing or two,
about the way we ran the Navy in nineteen forty two.

When wooden ships and iron men were barely out of sight,
I am going to give you some facts just to set the record right.

We wore the ole bell bottoms, with a flat hat on our head,
and we always hit the sack at night. We never "went to bed."

Our uniforms were worn ashore, and we were mighty proud.
Never thought of wearing civvies, in fact they were not allowed.

Now, when a ship puts out to sea. I'll tell you son, it hurts!
When suddenly you notice that half the crew's wearing skirts.

And it's hard for me to imagine, a female boatswains mate,
stopping on the Quarter deck to make sure her stockings are straight.

What happened to the KiYi brush, and the old salt-water bath?
Holy stoning decks at night, cause you stirred old Bosn's wrath!

We always had our gedunk stand and lots of pogey bait.
And it always took a hitch or two, just to make a rate.

In your seabag all your skivvies, were neatly stopped and rolled.
And the blankets on your sack had better have a three-inch fold.

Your little ditty bag . . it is hard to believe just how much it held,and you wouldn't go ashore with pants that hadn't been spiked and belled.

We had scullery maids and succotash and good old S.O.S.
And when you felt like topping off, you headed for the mess.

Oh we had our belly robbers, but there weren't too many gripes.
For the deck apes were never hungry and there were no starving snipes.

Now, you never hear of Davey Jones, Shellbacks or Polliwogs,
and you never splice the mainbrace to receive your daily grog.

Now you never have to dog a watch or stand the main event.
You even tie your lines today; back in my time they were bent.

We were all two-fisted drinkers and no one thought you sinned,
if you staggered back aboard your ship, three sheets to the wind.

And with just a couple hours of sleep you regained your usual luster.Bright eyed and bushy tailed, you still made morning muster.

Rocks and shoals have long since gone, and now it's U.C.M.J.
Back then the old man handled everything if you should go astray.

Now they steer the ships with dials, and I wouldn't be surprised,
if some day they sailed the damned things from the beach, computerized.

So when my earthly hitch is over, and the good Lord picks the best,
I'll walk right up to Him and say, "Sir, I have but one request.

Let me sail the seas of Heaven in a coat of Navy blue.
Like I did so long ago on earth, way back in forty two."
BY Erasmo "Doc" Riojas joined the U.S.Navy in 1948

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Subject: Re: lst 482


Author:
jesse hunt
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Date Posted: 11/19/09 13:15:03

thank you paul but i have looked through there and i have found some of the information about the ship but i haven't been able to find any pictures or details of what they did

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Subject: Carolinas State LST Chapter


Author:
Buddy LST 1126
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Date Posted: 11/15/09 00:32:37

I just completed the Carolinas LST State Chapter newsletter and in it is our agenda for the Beach Bash in May 2010. It will be mailed out next week. We will again be going to Myrtle Beach, staying at the Springmaid Resorts, and having three days of Sun and Fun. We will be eating out twice and going to a live show at the Palace Theater. In between that we will be munching on items from our Hospitality Room, telling Sea Stories, taking photos and just enjoying a room full of camaraderie. We will have a special speaker, one who will no doubt get a lot of questions from the crowd.

Membership is available to any honorably discharged veteran or one now serving. Yearly fees are only $15.00 for one year and $25.00 for two. The chapter is composed of WWII, Korean War and Vietnam War veterans at this time. We meet only once a year but do have a Scuttlebutt Newsletter of our own that goes out periodically. Anyone wishing to join and maybe even join us on our Beach Bash next year contact me at Buddy@LST1126.com. I'll send you a a packet of information and an application .... no charge.

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Subject: Computers are strange


Author:
Old Sea Dog
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Date Posted: 11/17/09 17:28:17

Once again my computer died but I am getting better at fixing it. This time I had it running as before within two hours. My fingers are crossed !. Microsoft is a major headache and soon I hope to be making a system change to a Macintosh with system OSX.

There needs to be a major shift in computer system structure and system software.

Old Sea Dog

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Subject: Hubble photo of Star nursery


Author:
old sea dog
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Date Posted: 11/13/09 17:41:31


This is a Hubble photo that shows distant clouds of matter condensing and giving birth to stars (like our sun). Each of the glowing dots in the clouds of matter is a growing baby star.
old sea dog

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Subject: In Memory of My Dad, Ernest Eugene Fuller


Author:
David Fuller
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Date Posted: 11/12/09 09:46:24

In memory of my dad Ernest Eugene Fuller

I received my dad's service record the other day and found out what ships he was on during his Coast Guard career. I found out he was on the LST-23. Interesting reading. Anyone interested read the story of the LST 23 on the CG history site. Now I know why my dad would not talk about the war. Thanks to Ron Wilkins for some of the ship photos.
My dad has always intrigued me. He was a perfectionist extraordinare. He only had a 9th grade education but achieved much in his Coast Guard career. Like many who fought in WW2 he saw much carnage in the battles he was in and would never speak about it. He was a kind and quiet man. He had wonderful friends and everyone who met him liked him. If I asked questions about the war he would tell me never to ask so my Mom was the only source of information and stories. I can only imagine what he must have seen during those battles in the pacific. When the LST he was on came back to the states for repair in May 1945 my Dad was lucky and got transfered stateside. His service record shows every conduct mark he got during his career was 4.0. He truly was a member of the greatest generation and he had the Coast Guard shield for a heart. 1918-1967

Dave Fuller

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Subject: Re: In Memory of My Dad, Ernest Eugene Fuller


Author:
SeaBat
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Date Posted: 11/12/09 15:24:11

Dave... Your Dad is looking down from above, grinning ear to ear that you remember and pay tribute by sharing.

Thanks.. Can't wait to read the saga!

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Subject: NAVSOURCE PIC. LST 125


Author:
OLD SEA DOG
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Date Posted: 11/ 8/09 17:21:16



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Subject: UNITED STATES MARINES 234 YEARS OLD


Author:
OLD SEA DOG
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Date Posted: 11/10/09 18:54:53

HAPPY 234 TH. BIRTHDAY TO THE UNITED STATES MARINES
THIS PICTURE IS WORTH 100,000 WORDS, IT MAY BRING A TEAR TO YOUR EYE.


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Subject: SOME STUFF


Author:
OLD SEA DOG
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Date Posted: 11/11/09 06:28:37


I'M SURE THERE IS A STORY BEHIND THIS.
................................................................

GREAT SHIPS NAME !
.............................................


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Subject: Thank You


Author:
Paul Sullenberger
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Date Posted: 11/10/09 23:17:42

Thanks to all of my fellow veterans who have served around the world in war and in peace, and helped preserve our freedoms. Thanks to their families, too many of whom have lost a son, daughter, husband or father in our nation's service.

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Subject: LSTS AT OKINAWA 1945 / VIDEO


Author:
OLD SEA DOG
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Date Posted: 11/ 9/09 18:12:35

SHOWS LSTS HEADING FOR OKINAWA.


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Replies:

Subject: OUCH


Author:
OLD SEA DOG
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Date Posted: 11/ 8/09 17:53:10



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Subject: Iraqi Camel Spiders !!!


Author:
OSD
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Date Posted: 10/20/09 18:34:32


Iraqi Camel Spider
........................................
Don't we have enough to worry about in Iraq?! Have a look at the gnashers on these babies!
.........................................................................................................................................
You've heard the desert spiders are big in Iraq, They sure are !.
OSD

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Subject: Re: LST-129


Author:
Buddy LST 1126
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Date Posted: 10/23/09 03:41:47

Your best possibly is to join the US LST Association (www.USLST.org) in his name. You will receive a list of shipmates who have joined who served on the LST 129. It cost $19.00 a year and you get a newsletter which may contain information at times on the LST 129.

Good Luck

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Subject: british coastal gun platforms WWII


Author:
OSD
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Date Posted: 10/27/09 11:03:16



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Subject: New addition to the LST 325 Museum area


Author:
SeaBat
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Date Posted: 11/ 8/09 09:40:01

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Some of the snipes of LST 325 putting together pods to house the 40mm's.... looks like a beautiful day and a productive one!

Photos courtesy of Kenny and Anna Adams

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Subject: THE SUISUN BAY MOTHBALL FLEET


Author:
OLD SEA DOG
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Date Posted: 11/ 4/09 19:09:23

EVERY TIME I GO PAST THE MOTHBALL FLEET I LOOK OUT AT THE SHIPS KNOWING THAT TWO OF MY OLD SHIPS USED TO BE THERE. ONE HAS BEEN MOVED FOR SCRAPPING (AN LST), THE OTHER IS STILL THERE (LSD-35 USS MONTICELLO). IS ONE OF YOUR OLD SHIPS THERE ?.
THE SUISUN BAY MOTHBALL FLEET










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Subject: THE HERO AT FT. HOOD


Author:
OLD SEA DOG
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Date Posted: 11/ 6/09 18:22:52


'Tough woman' cop hailed Fort Hood hero
.....................................................................
Fort Hood, Texas (CNN) -- The police officer who ended the Fort Hood massacre by shooting the suspect is known as the enforcer on her street, a "tough woman" who patrolled her neighborhood and once stopped burglars at her house.

It was Munley who arrived quickly Thursday at the scene of the worst massacre at an Army base in U.S. history, where 13 people were killed. She confronted the alleged gunman, Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan, and shot him four times. Munley was wounded in the exchange. That's just like her, friends and family say. "We sleep a lot safer knowing she's on the block," said Sgt. William Barbrow, another neighbor.

When Bryan Munley heard that his sister-in-law thwarted the alleged gunman in a shootout, he wasn't surprised. "There's nothing that stands in her way. It completely makes sense that she did what she did," he said from Downingtown, Pennsylvania. "It was amazing. Without her, there would have been a lot more people killed."
He added, "She is definitely a tough woman."

Munley, 34, is being treated for her wounds. Her father, former Carolina Beach, North Carolina, Mayor Dennis Barbour, said his daughter is doing well. "Her efforts were superb," said Col. Steven Braverman, the base hospital commander. Lt. Gen. Bob Cone, Fort Hood's commanding general, described Munley as a "trained, active first responder" who acted quickly after she "just happened to encounter the gunman."

"Really a pretty amazing and aggressive performance by this police officer," he said. Cone said Munley and her partner responded "very quickly" to the scene -- reportedly in about three minutes.

On social networking sites, she was lauded for her actions. One Facebook fan page was called "Sgt. Kimberly Munley: A Real American Hero" and had more than 1,400 members.

"My prayers for a fast recovery as well as my sincere thanks of an outstanding job," one person wrote. One woman added, "U got some brass balls, girl ... u r my hero!!!!"

Authorities say Hasan, an Army psychiatrist, opened fire at a military processing center at Fort Hood on Thursday, killing 13 and wounding 30 others. Cone was asked on CNN's "American Morning" whether Munley's shots brought down the assailant and stopped him from shooting. "That's correct," Cone said. "The critical factor here was her quick response to the situation." Bryan Munley said Munley is married to his brother, Staff Sgt. Matthew Munley. He said Matthew was in Downingtown, outside Philadelphia, visiting his family when the shootings happened. The couple, married since 2006, have a 3-year-old daughter named Jayden.
She is definitely a tough woman.

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Subject: Thinking of you all as we approach Veteran's Day


Author:
SeaBat
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Date Posted: 11/ 8/09 09:24:26

and my thoughts run from the silly pranks you played on each other - boys all too soon becoming men - to the hardships you endured. Atlantic to Pacific, Korea to VietNam; Peacetime or War makes no difference - you all gave of yourselves willingly. Some memories too difficult to dwell on, some more pleasant. The places you've been, the people you met, the friends you made and often said a sad farewell to.

On this Veteran's Day, if you're willing, would some of you share your thoughts of your shipmates or places you've been? Who was the clown on board your ship? What was the most beautiful sight you saw? Was there a place that you 'visited' that you've wanted to go back to?

I know Dewey Taylor often talks about his post war trips to Australia, he really enjoyed his time there. I was honored to listen to one Sailor speak of the majestic beauty of ships as they sailed for Normandy. My Dad spoke of the beauty of the islands in the South Pacific; he always wanted to return, but that was not to be. I've heard a VietNam era Sailor laugh about the continual supply of bananas they had and others tell of 'beach parties' they survived.

I don't want to intrude on your private thoughts or feelings, but would be honored if some of you would share a bit of your thoughts to honor your shipmates and your service this Veteran's Day.

My deepest thanks and appreciation to all of you for the freedoms that we enjoy today.

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Subject: PEOPLE DIED ON BOTH SIDES


Author:
OLD SEA DOG
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Date Posted: 11/ 6/09 17:32:18



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Subject: LST 562


Author:
OLD SEA DOG
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Date Posted: 11/ 6/09 07:27:34

LST-562
LST-562 was laid down on 28 February 1944 at Evansville, Ind., by the Missouri Valley Bridge & Iron Co.; launched on 28 April 1944; sponsored by Mrs. D. A. Nordeen; and commissioned on 18 May 1944.
During World War II, LST-562 was assigned to the Asiatic-Pacific theater and participated in the Morotai landings in September 1944 and the Tarakan Island operation in April and May 1945.
Following the war, LST-562 performed occupation duty in the Far East until mid-December 1945. She was decommissioned on 21 May 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 3 July that same year. On 19 April 1948, the ship was sold to the Bethlehem Steel Co., of Bethlehem, Pa., and subsequently scrapped.
LST-562 earned two battle stars for World War II service.

LST-562 and LST-584 beached at Morotai, 30 May 1945 while Australian Army troops of 2/19th Transport Platoon load the units DUKWs aboard for transport to North Borneo and "Operation Oboe 6".
Australian War Memorial photo # 108519.

LST-911 (far left) beached along with LST-562, LST-613 and an unidentified LST, date and place unknown

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Subject: Dr. Seuss in WWII


Author:
Old Sea Dog
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Date Posted: 11/ 1/09 17:22:21


A rather strange Dr. Seuss cartoon from WWII

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Subject: Does anyone know the two outer men in this picture


Author:
David Fuller
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Date Posted: 08/15/09 12:42:46

This photo was taken aboard an LST in the Pacific aprox 1944.
The center person is my dad Ens. Ernest E Fuller. From the research I have done it seems he was on the LST 205. Does anyone have any information on this ship or picture? Thank you all very much.

Photobucket

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Subject: SHIPS PATCH


Author:
OLD SEA DOG
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Date Posted: 11/ 2/09 17:51:08



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Subject: USS NEW YORK CUTAWAY


Author:
OLD SEA DOG
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Date Posted: 11/ 2/09 18:04:17



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Subject: USS NEW YORK STEEL FROM WTC


Author:
OLD SEA DOG
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Date Posted: 11/ 2/09 17:29:03

FORGING THE STEEL FROM THE WTC FOR THE BOW OF THE USS NEW YORK


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  • THE STEEL -- OLD SEA DOG, 11/ 2/09 17:40:22

Subject: USS New York... photos from today


Author:
Courtesy of Ken Frank
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Date Posted: 11/ 2/09 09:46:22

She came out of the mist. Up the harbor, past Lady Liberty, past Ellis Island. Sailors and Marines manned the rail. She was beautiful in Haze Gray with the faint number "21" on her bow.

She halted abeam of the site where the World Trade Centers had stood. The Sailors and Marines came to "Hand Salute". The Marines on the flight deck fired a 21 gun salute. The US Flag on the forward tower was lowered to 1/2 staff in honor of those fallen in the worst attack on America.

After a moment the US Flag went back up to full staff. The command "All ahead 1/3". You could see the prop wash now at the stern of the ship.

She started to move again. Headed up to her birth next to the Intrepid CV11 a famous sister ship where she will receive her full commission in the US Navy on Saturday. As she left us she sounded her horn to say "Thanks and I'm on my way, into Harm's Way if need be."

What a morning. Enjoy the pictures. Tell our Skipper our horn is louder, and I wished we were trailing her up the harbor. The oldest Amphib and the newest.

Meanwhile, construction is well underway at the site where the WTC towers stood. We move on. No one can stop us.

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

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Subject: Old Sea Dog is a Shellback


Author:
OSD
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Date Posted: 11/ 1/09 16:30:32

Paul: I ceased being a pollywog on a run the LST 1165 made from Japan to Australia and New Zealand. We sailed from Yokosuka and went to Sydney, stayed a few days, and then sailed on to Christchurch, New Zealand. While at New Zealand we went out to the Maori sites and saw examples of a Maori village and artworks.

I will never forget having to kiss the belly of the royal baby, yuck it was smeared with motor grease.

Just another Navy adventure !. Old Sea Dog

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Subject: Header photo taken by Ken Frank


Author:
SeaBat
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Date Posted: 10/31/09 06:35:11

This photo was taken on the recent Jeffersonville cruise of LST 325. I thought it was stunning in it's beauty... thanks to Ken for sharing!

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Subject: Dam on the Ruhr


Author:
OSD
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Date Posted: 10/27/09 18:02:03


The dam on the Ruhr river that the "bounce bombs" took out.

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Subject: Saipan


Author:
OSD
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Date Posted: 10/27/09 10:38:05



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Subject: Anzio landing


Author:
OSD
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Date Posted: 10/27/09 08:42:23


from an Italian website. OSD

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Subject: HISTORY PAGE ABOUT LST 129


Author:
OSD
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Date Posted: 10/26/09 18:48:32

LINK TO HISTORY PAGE WITH 51 MINUTE INTERVIEW.
....................................
HERE YOU ARE CHRIS. OLD SEA DOG

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Subject: Chris / Found a crew member of LST 129


Author:
OSD
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Date Posted: 10/26/09 18:41:59


Marvin Wayland Hitchcock

Marvin Hitchcock [detail from video] War: World War II, 1939-1946
Branch: Navy
Unit: USS LST 129 (Landing Ship Tank)
Service Location: Pacific Theater
Rank: Coxswain
Place of Birth: Phil Campbell, AL
...................................................................

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Subject: For Chris / Information about the LST 129


Author:
The Old Sea Dog
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Date Posted: 10/26/09 18:22:12

LST-129 / IX-198 Cohasset

Awards, Citations and Campaign Ribbons

American Campaign Medal - Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal - World War II Victory Medal

LST-1 Class Tank Landing Ship: Laid down, 1 July 1943, at Missouri Valley Bridge and Iron Co., Evansville, IN.; Launched, 8 September 1943; Commissioned USS LST-129, 23 October 1943; During World War II, LST-129 was assigned to the Asiatic-Pacific theater and participated in the:

* Marianas operation;
(a) Capture and occupation of Saipan, June and July 1944
(b) Capture and occupation of Tinian, July 1944
* Western Caroline Islands operation;
Capture and Occupation of southern Palau Islands, September and October 1944

Redesignated and renamed Cohasset (IX-198), 5 December 1944; Decommissioned, 20 January 1945; Final Disposition, destroyed as naval target, 16 May 1946; Struck from the Naval Register, 19 June 1946. Cohasset (IX-198) earned two battle stars for World War II service as LST-129.
..............................................................
This is the official information about the LST 129 / IX 198. The lack of other information and pictures of the ship lead me to think that something very serious happened during September or October of 1944. The LST 129 was redesignated IX 198, a target ship to be sunk, and in fact it was sunk by naval gunfire on 16 May, 1946.

There are no pictures I can find in the usual places LST pictures exist, that tells me that the Navy thought pictures of the damage, whatever it was, should not be released. Perhaps a crewmember or a log book would fill in the gaps. I will keep on looking for pictures of the LST 129 / IX 198, but my sensors tell me that none exist anywhere.

I found the information I wanted, The LST 129 and several others were damaged by a heavy storm during the Palau operation. This is what was noted in a log book
.................................................................
10/02 Mon. United States naval vessels damaged by storm, Palau
Islands, Caroline Islands:
LST 129, LST 278, and LST 661,
06 d. 59'N., 134 d. 13'E.

The Old Sea Dog

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Subject: model C5A GALAXY


Author:
OSD
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Date Posted: 10/25/09 18:31:00


AND I THOUGHT I HAD SEEN SOME BIG MODELS, NONE LIKE THIS !.

OSD

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Subject: Life Magazine. 10 cents per edition at the time!


Author:
SeaBat
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Date Posted: 10/25/09 03:04:55

http://www.life.com/image/2628526/in-gallery/23030/wwii-women-in-the-fight

WVaRay shared these... wonderful photos! Thanks Ray!

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Subject: Saddam's Gold !


Author:
OSD
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Date Posted: 10/20/09 08:03:46


"41,000 LBS of Sadam's gold on six pallets waiting to be loaded on a C-17 headed for Kuwait."
...............................................................................................
Question: When that gold got to Kuwait what was done with it ?, Who wound up with it ?, and why did I not hear about it before now ?. Lots of questions.

OSD

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Subject: Marine Doctor / a powerful image !


Author:
OSD
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Date Posted: 10/20/09 08:16:40


A U.S. marine doctor holds an Iraqi girl in central Iraq March 29, 2003. Confused front line crossfire ripped apart an Iraqi family after local soldiers appeared to force civilians towards U.S. marines positions. 29 Mar 2003 REUTERS
.....................................................
Some sad things in the name of War !

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Subject: The Chief


Author:
Paul Sullenberger
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Date Posted: 10/20/09 01:47:58

The Navy Chief noticed a new seaman and barked at him, "Get over here! What's your name sailor?"



"John," the new seaman replied.



"Look, I don't know what kind of bleeding-heart pansy crap they're teaching sailors in boot camp these days, but I don't call anyone by his first name," the chief scowled. "It breeds familiarity, and that leads to a breakdown in authority. I refer to my sailors by their last names only; Smith, Jones, Baker, whatever. And you are to refer to me as 'Chief'. Do I make myself clear?"

"Aye, Aye Chief!"

"Now that we've got that straight, what's your last name?"

The seaman sighed. "Darling, My name is John Darling, Chief."

"Okay, John, here's what I want you to do ...."

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Subject: The YP-389 and German Sub


Author:
Old Sea Dog
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Date Posted: 10/19/09 09:27:04


Photo mosaic of YP-389, sunk off North Carolina by a German submarine on June 19, 1942. It was found and photographed in a 2009 expedition. Credit: NOAA
.........................................................................................................
Sunken WWII Navy Patrol Boat Found

By LiveScience Staff


A U.S. Navy patrol boat sunk during WWII has been found and photographed 20 miles off Cape Hatteras, N.C.

The wreck of the YP-389, a converted fishing trawler, rests in about 300 feet of water in a region known as the "Graveyard of the Atlantic," where several U.S. and British naval vessels, merchant ships, and German U-boats sunk during the Battle of the Atlantic.

Six sailors died when the YP-389 was attacked by a German submarine June 19, 1942. There were 18 survivors. The research mission was led by NOAA. The relatively intact remains of the YP-389 rest upright on the ship's keel, NOAA said in a statement this week. The wreck site is home to a variety of marine life. Much of the outer-hull plating has fallen away, leaving only the intact frames exposed.

"She rests now like a literal skeleton, a reminder of a time long ago when the nation was at war," said Joseph Hoyt, Monitor National Marine Sanctuary archaeologist and principal investigator for the project.

Built originally as a fishing trawler, the YP-389 was converted into a coastal patrol craft and pressed into service after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. The ship was equipped with one 3-inch deck gun to protect the ship from enemy aircraft and surfaced submarines and two .30-caliber machine guns. However, on the day of the attack by the German submarine U-701, the ship's deck gun was inoperative, and the YP-389 could return fire only with its machine guns.

"The story of the YP-389 personifies the character of the Battle of the Atlantic along the East Coast of the United States, where small poorly armed fishing trawlers were called to defend American waters against one of Germany's most feared vessels," said David W. Alberg, expedition leader and superintendent of the Monitor National Marine Sanctuary. "It is one of the most dramatic accounts of an engagement between Axis and Allied warships during the dark days of World War II."

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Subject: Those "Puppies Feet" are heavy


Author:
Old Sea Dog
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Date Posted: 10/18/09 17:09:09

I carried and attached "puppy feet"/ Dogging Chains many times, and when you have a main deck full of vehicles, thats at least 4 chains per vehicle,that's a lot of heavy metal to lug around. The Dogging wrench was big and heavy too.

I was always amazed at how well they worked in rough weather.
Old Sea Dog

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Subject: Don't Brag About Your Computer, It's Listening


Author:
Old Sea Dog
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Date Posted: 10/18/09 17:02:16

Buddy: There I went and bragged about my new computer, and it heard and decided to rool over and die. I had it fail shortly after I posted that message. I had to do major repair on it. I was down for four days working on it.

At one point I had three computer shells on my workbench, swapping parts and testing. What a pain in the Ass. After lots of testing and debugging I got one computer working from the parts of three. I hope it keeps going. No more bragging !.
The Old Sea Dog

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Subject: LST Model


Author:
Old Sea Dog
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Date Posted: 10/14/09 18:43:48


Beautifully Hand Crafted Mahogany Landing Ship Tank (LST)
Model #: MBLST
Length: 24"
Price: $595.95
................................
Too much for me

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Subject: My hot new Wi-Fi Connection


Author:
The Old Sea Dog
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Date Posted: 10/14/09 18:13:40

I now have the Internet connection that everyone dreams of, it's a Wi-Fi connection through a high speed hub. It works at an amazing 54 MBPS (mega bits per second), thats a lot of data moving through the air !. All I can say is "Hot Damn".
Old Sea Dog

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Subject: The Mighty Mo


Author:
Old Sea Dog
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Date Posted: 10/14/09 18:01:08


Plastic sheeting covers the superstructure of the USS Missouri while the battleship is being painted.
.................................................................................................
Tugboats maneuver Missouri into dry dock

The Associated Press
Posted : Wednesday Oct 14, 2009 15:25:12 EDT

HONOLULU — Four tugboats have gently maneuvered the iconic battleship USS Missouri into a dry dock, where it will undergo a major refurbishment. Later Wednesday, the dock’s gates will close and water will be pumped out, eventually leaving the 54,889-ton vessel sitting on 310 wooden blocks that weigh four tons each.

The two-mile move from its Ford Island pier began earlier Wednesday when a heavy rope was cast off from the ship’s bow and its mooring. With a short horn blast, a tug began pushing the 887-foot-long Missouri backward and away from its pier for the first time in more than 11 years. The Missouri is the last battleship built by the United States. It also was the site of Japan’s surrender in World War II, on Sept. 2, 1945.

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Subject: Building Base at Milne Bay, New Guinea


Author:
The Old Sea Dog
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Date Posted: 10/14/09 17:54:02


http://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/USN/Building_Bases/img/bases2-p306.jpg
Advance Base Construction Depot, Milne Bay, New Georgia
........................................................
looks like some T's at the piers

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Subject: Elder Sea Dog


Author:
Buddy LST 1126
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Date Posted: 10/ 8/09 03:44:34

Where is our "Elder Old Sea Dog"? I hope he's doing okay and will post some more of his "Stuff".

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Subject: One man's perspective


Author:
Paul Sullenberger
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Date Posted: 10/ 4/09 11:45:29



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=McwFYeQ5xek

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Subject: Re: Okay Cloverleaf...


Author:
SeaBat
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Date Posted: 10/ 2/09 12:09:58

You were, Cloverleaf!!!! You should be proud!! It took me a LONG time to learn what I have, and I still have a huge amount to learn... and this is a fun way to do so.

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Subject: LST 492


Author:
Paul Sullenberger
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Date Posted: 05/13/09 07:46:21

Photobucket
Another picture showing German POW's on the deck of the 492. Crew members I can identify are my father, Sam Sullenberger (left side of picture, no shirt) Dominic Rotondo (kneeling in white t-shirt) Louis "Cutch" Cutshall (behind Dominic wearing ball cap) Russell Davis (to Dominic's right) Jim West (standing in front of LCVP on davit) and Howard Knight, (standing behind Dominic and Cutch).

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Subject: Okay Cloverleaf...


Author:
SeaBat
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Date Posted: 09/28/09 14:53:09

This is trivia, just for you! Can you find the answer? :-)

(Buddy and OSD.. don't tell! And if the rest of you want to venture a response, do so!!!)

What is the item in the header photo used for?

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Subject: From our friend Bernie... ;-)


Author:
SeaBat
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Date Posted: 10/ 1/09 11:23:43

One small correction, the Navy Supply Corps School is in Athens, Georgia, not Pensacola.






Lt. Cmdr James “Red” Coe was CO of the USS Skipjack when he wrote his
famous "toilet paper" letter to the Mare Island Supply Office.
========================================================
USS SKIPJACK

June 11, 1942

From: Commanding Officer

To: Supply Officer, Navy Yard, Mare Island, California
Via: Commander Submarines, Southwest Pacific

Subject: Toilet Paper
Reference: (a) USS HOLLAND (5148) USS SKIPJACK req. 70-42 of 30 July 1941.

(b) SO NYMI Canceled invoice No. 272836

Enclosure: (1) Copy of canceled Invoice
(2) Sample of material requested.

1. This vessel submitted a requisition for 150 rolls of toilet paper on
July 30, 1941, to USS HOLLAND. The material was ordered by HOLLAND from the
Supply Officer, Navy Yard, Mare Island, for delivery to USS SKIPJACK.

2. The Supply Officer, Navy Yard, Mare Island, on November 26, 1941,
canceled Mare Island Invoice No. 272836 with the stamped notation
"Canceled---cannot identify." This canceled invoice was received by SKIPJACK on June 10,
1942.

3. During the 11 ¾ months elapsing from the time of ordering the toilet
paper and the present date, the SKIPJACK personnel, despite their best
efforts to await delivery of subject material, have been unable to wait on
numerous occasions, and the situation is now quite acute, especially during depth
charge attack by the "Japs."

4. Enclosure (2) is a sample of the desired material provided for the
information of the Supply Officer, Navy Yard, Mare Island. The Commanding
Officer, USS SKIPJACK cannot help but wonder what is being used in Mare Island
in place of this unidentifiable material, once well known to this command.

5. SKIPJACK personnel during this period have become accustomed to use of
"ersatz," i.e., the vast amount of incoming non-essential paper work, and
in so doing feel that the wish of the Bureau of Ships for the reduction of
paper work is being complied with, thus effectively killing two birds with
one stone.

6. It is believed by this command that the stamped notation "cannot
identify" was possible error, and that this is simply a case of shortage of
strategic war material, the SKIPJACK probably being low on the priority list.

7. In order to cooperate in our war effort at a small local sacrifice, the
SKIPJACK desires no further action be taken until the end of the current
war, which has created a situation aptly described as "war is hell." J.W.
Coe
============================================================
Here is the rest of the story:

The letter was given to the Yeoman, telling him to type it up. Once typed
and upon reflection, the Yeoman went looking for help in the form of the
XO. The XO shared it with the OD and they proceeded to the CO's cabin and
asked if he really wanted it sent. His reply, "I wrote it, didn't I?"

As a side note, twelve days later, on June 22, 1942 J.W. Coe was awarded
the Navy Cross for his actions on the S-39. (Previous command)
The "toilet paper" letter reached Mare Island Supply Depot. A member of
that office remembers that all officers in the Supply Department "had to
stand at attention for three days because of that letter." By then, the letter
had been copied and was spreading throughout the fleet and even to the
President's son who was aboard the USS Wasp.

As the boat came in from her next patrol, Jim and crew saw toilet-paper
streamers blowing from the lights along the pier and pyramids of toilet paper
stacked seven feet high on the dock. Two men were carrying a long dowel
with toilet paper rolls on it with yards of paper streaming behind them as a
band played coming up after the roll holders. Band members wore toilet
paper neckties in place of their Navy neckerchiefs. The wind-section had
toilet paper pushed up inside their instruments and when they blew, white
streamers unfurled from trumpets and horns.

As was the custom for returning boats to be greeted at the pier with cases
of fresh fruit/veggies and ice cream, the Skipjack was first greeted
thereafter with her own distinctive tribute-cartons and cartons of toilet paper.

This letter became famous in submarine history books and found its way to
the movie ("Operation Petticoat"), and eventually coming to rest (copy) at
the Navy Supply School at Pensacola, Florida. There, it still hangs on the
wall under a banner that reads, "Don't let this happen to you!" Even John
Roosevelt insured his father got a copy of the letter.

The original is at Bowfin Museum in Hawaii.

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Subject: Ohio State v. Navy 9 September 2009


Author:
Paul Sullenberger
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Date Posted: 09/25/09 13:44:57

http://www.facebook.com/l.php?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DLMVNJcfUVNc&h=bd14782912451314175623d59675acd8

Here's what happened on Game Day. Class act by OSU and Navy, and a good game at that, Navy gave them all they wanted.

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Subject: good day


Author:
cloverleaf
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Date Posted: 09/22/09 03:52:53

how r all my friends.
let's get to gabbing.

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Subject: Vietnam River Boat


Author:
OSD
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Date Posted: 04/30/09 17:54:13

Watch out Charlie !

http://www.tf116.org/vietnam_photos/CBihl/4_lg.jpg

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Subject: LST 1083 USS PLUMAS COUNTY


Author:
OSD
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Date Posted: 05/ 6/09 16:23:05


http://bellsouthpwp.net/r/i/ricklieb/images/budwarpics/lst1083.jpg
..............................................................................................
USS PLUMAS COUNTY LST 1083
....................................................
The Old Sea Dog walked the decks of the old Plumas County for some years, she was a classic LST, long and slow and loved to wallow in the sea. Good times !.
The Old Sea Dog

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Subject: GREAT HISTORY


Author:
JT
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Date Posted: 09/16/09 01:15:19

On 1 Oct I'll complete a 30 year Navy career and early in it I was fortunate enough to serve on an LST Hull (USS SPHINX ARL-24). Your website and photos are priceless and should be mandatory viewing for all Americans (especially from the sea services.)

Thanks!

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Subject: usa


Author:
cloverleaf
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Date Posted: 09/15/09 04:19:20

i am becoming more active in gov.
going to start working with my non-pofit again.

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Subject: Lest We Forget...


Author:
SeaBat
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Date Posted: 09/10/09 13:53:13

Todd C. Weaver: A September 11th Remembrance

"One thing is clear: Todd Christopher Weaver was an adventurous man. This was not a man who drifted through life waiting for it to happen; instead, Todd was the sort to wrestle life to the ground and make it beg for mercy (in a happy coincidence, he was born on New Years Eve). He died a young man of 30, yet his biography reads like that of a man in his sixties.

This was a man who took his college sweetheart, Amy Lawson, all the way to Japan, where he taught for a year; upon his return to Chicago, he became the youngest senior consultant in the history of J.H. Ellwood and Associates; and he was, incredibly, a vice president with Fiduciary Trust Company International at the age of 30, with an office on the 94th floor of the World Trade Centers South Tower that day that United Airlines Flight 175 crashed though the 78th 84th floors in the most-viewed moment in history.

His is not the face of an arrogant man, though; indeed, an instant likeability radiates from his bespectacled visage. He looks like a modern-day Richie Cunningham: smart, nice, and sociable (Scott Kenagy, who worked with Todd, remembers his dry sense of humor and the respect he commanded from his coworkers; Bill Rauckhorst, who taught Todd at Miami of Ohio, remembers him as very bright and personable). He had a taste for New Order and PIL, we learn from a friends remembrance, so its safe to assume he liked to dance; we also know he was an athlete at the Western Reserve Academy, the prestigious boarding school for high-schoolers in Hudson, Ohio, wearing the number 54 (WRA has a memorial scholarship in his honor).

Of course, no one reaches the level of success that Todd reached without a lot of drive, and he was competitive, in a wholesome way:

Once, on a skiing trip with his wife and his in-laws, Todd Weaver discovered that he was not the best skier in the family. The best by far was his wife, Amy Lawson. But he was determined that he was not going be beaten by anyone, said his father-in-law, Ted Lawson. So Mr. Weaver studied up and took lessons, and the next year surprised everyone by blasting down the mountain, the proud new Best Skier of the Family, his brand-new bright yellow jacket clearly visible to all.
To my knowledge, we dont know the details of Todds death that horrible day; we do know that only 18 people above the impact zone in the South Tower survived (though many had decided to leave before the second plane hit), so even a man as well-positioned to overcome the odds as Todd had little chance by the sheer fluke of his office location. Fiduciary Trust had offices on floors 90 and 94-97 of the South Tower, and lost 87 employees in the attack; altogether, 600 people lost their lives in the South Tower on September 11th.

I hope Ive done at least a small amount of justice to the memory of one of them.

A native of Stark, Ohio, Todd is survived by his wife, Amy, and his parents, Marilyn and Dennis.

This September 11th, I dont want to push any particular agenda; this is a day of mourning, not partisanship. I only have one thing I would like you all to keep in mind: each of these nearly 3,000 people was a unique individual. Not all were as accomplished as Todd, but all of them had a life snuffed short by an incredible act of cruelty. Pray for the souls of the departed, if you will, and pray for the continued recovery and solace of those who loved them, and thank God for every day that you have, good or bad, because tomorrow is not promised to any one of us, high or low, rich or poor."

Sources: Newsday; Wikipedia; September 11th Victims; New York Times; and other sources

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May Dennis, Marilyn, Amy and Marji find some peace and solace this September 11th. Todd.. we miss you!

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Subject: hello


Author:
cloverleaf
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Date Posted: 09/ 9/09 09:05:13

how r all my friends.i am feeling better.
what r we kickin around?

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Subject: miss you all


Author:
cloverdleaf
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Date Posted: 08/27/09 03:40:55

how r u all?
who r the handsome men in the photo?

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Subject: I'm with you on this one, Paul...


Author:
SeaBat
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Date Posted: 09/ 9/09 08:47:02

My two favorite teams.. who to root for??? BOTH! What a game it was!

For the first time in Ohio Stadium's history BOTH teams took the field together! What a statement that made!

GO BUCKS! GO NAVY!

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Subject: politics


Author:
clovereaf
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Date Posted: 09/ 6/09 10:19:03

are we 'the united states' in bad hands

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Subject: Locking at McAlpine


Author:
SeaBat
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Date Posted: 09/ 6/09 10:45:35

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Subject: posters


Author:
cloverleaf
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Date Posted: 09/ 6/09 03:43:43

i have a small photo of 'gerald ford' playing basketball on his ship.

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Subject: More WWII Posters


Author:
Paul Sullenberger
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Date Posted: 09/ 3/09 12:26:50

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Subject: Vote for Bill


Author:
Paul Sullenberger
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Date Posted: 09/ 3/09 09:58:38

http://www.capitalonebowl.com/home/main

Vote for Navy's Mascot Bill the Goat as College Football Mascot of the Year for the Capital One bowl.

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Subject: been sick


Author:
cloverleaf
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Date Posted: 08/ 8/09 16:11:30

having healh problems as of late had to start insulin

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Subject: WWII PHOTOS " THE ALLISON COLLECTION "


Author:
OSD
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Date Posted: 08/15/09 08:15:10

YOU SAY YOU WANT WWII PHOTOS, WE GOT WWII PHOTOS, THE ALLISON COLLECTION, 166 GALLERYS OF PHOTOS. MORE THAN YOU COULD EVER LOOK AT.
THE ALLISON COLLECTION

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Subject: V-J Day


Author:
SeaBat
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Date Posted: 08/15/09 07:44:24

was taken in Times Square, NY August, 1945.. celebrating VJ Day (not VE Day as some may have thought).


http://www.historyplace.com/worldwar2/ww2-pix/vj.jpg


News stories:

http://www.examiner.com/x-17195-LA-Esoteric-History-Examiner~y2009m8d15-Happy-Victory-over-Japan-Day-plus-1

http://www.history.com/content/vjday

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Subject: LST Week 2009


Author:
SeaBat
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Date Posted: 08/13/09 12:30:01

The header photo is of a few of the Gold Crew members who were in attendance at LST Week.

The smiles on the faces of all of the shipmates in attendance was a joy to see after the Committees worked so hard to give them a great week. It makes all of the work and planning worthwhile.

Thanks for the Liberty chit, OSD... it helped us provide these shipmates with a time and place to reminisce, to meet new friends and have some fun!

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Subject: Will we finally know what happened


Author:
OSD
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Date Posted: 08/ 1/09 16:34:01

Amelia Earhart Mystery Solved? 'Investigation Junkies' to Launch New Expedition
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DNA Evidence on a Remote Island May Reveal the Truth About Earhart's Disappearance
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The International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery is planning another expedition to Nikumaroro Island in the hopes of uncovering DNA evidence that may show Amelia Earhart survived there for a short period of time.
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It has been 72 years since famed aviator Amelia Earhart and navigator Fred Noonan disappeared while attempting to fly around the world. But the mystery remains unsolved: Nobody knows exactly what happened to Earhart or her plane.
amelia .The International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery is planning another expedition to Nikumaroro Island in the hopes of uncovering DNA evidence that may show Amelia Earhart survived there for a short period of time. Now researchers at the International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery, or Tighar, say they are on the verge of recovering DNA evidence that would demonstrate Earhart had been stranded on Nikumaroro Island (formerly known as Gardner Island) before finally perishing there.

During May and June of next year, Tighar will launch a new $500,000 expedition, continuing the archaeological work it has been doing on the island since 2001. "We think we will be able to come back with DNA," said Tighar's Executive Director Ric Gillespie, who is working with two DNA labs in Ontario, Canada, Genesis Genomics and Molecular World. "We were out there in 2007 under the impression that in order to extract DNA we would need to find a piece of a human, and we didn't find anything like that. But we did find what's best described as personal effects of the castaway that died there." During the 2007 trip, Gillespie and his crew uncovered early 20th-century makeup and two pieces of broken glass that match a 1930s compact mirror, among other artifacts. DNA can be extracted from such remnants as long as those artifacts aren't contaminated during the collection process. Unfortunately, in 2007, they were. Armed with a new collection protocol, Gillespie and his team will return to the site to seek out new items during their May 2010 excursion.

Earlier this year a woman directly related to Earhart, who wishes to remain anonymous, agreed to provide Gillespie's group with a reference sample of mitochondrial DNA. This type of genetic material differs from nuclear DNA in many ways, primarily because it's passed down the female line. Mitochondrial DNA, also referred to as mtDNA, is often used in forensics research. Because mtDNA is found in the cell's mitochondria, rather than the chromosomes of the cell's fragile nucleus, it isn't as quick to break down even when subject to difficult environmental conditions.

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Subject: WWII Posters


Author:
Paul Sullenberger
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Date Posted: 08/ 6/09 13:42:05

Photobucket
I'm involved in a committee that is organizing bus trips from Miami County Ohio to Washington DC for WWII Vets, we're in the process of planning the third trip that I've had involvement in, our 5th overall. One of our committee members had a group of WWII posters that had been e-mailed to him, he printed them off so we can use them in our booth at the Miami County Fair in a couple of weeks, and other events that we'll be promoting our mission at.
Here's one, I'll be posting more in the next few days.

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Subject: They Did Their Part


Author:
Paul Sullenberger
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Date Posted: 08/ 6/09 13:55:53

Photobucket
"having laid so costly a sacrifice upon the altar of freedom..."
This one is slightly doctored from the original photo of the 5 Sullivan brothers aboard the USS Juneau. The "V" on the hatch in the original is upside down. (For non-Navy types, a letter on a hatch, door, or other opening through a deck or bulkhead indicates the "material condition of readiness for watertight integrity" of that particular opening.) Of course, "V" stood for Victory, so it was natural that it would be altered to be more readable for this poster.

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Subject: More WWII Posters


Author:
Paul Sullenberger
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Date Posted: 08/12/09 13:17:49

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Subject: What Did You Do For Freedom Today?


Author:
Paul Sullenberger
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Date Posted: 08/ 6/09 13:45:26

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This one is timeless...

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Subject: LST Versatility


Author:
Paul Sullenberger
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Date Posted: 07/31/09 14:17:30

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The LST was frequently assigned to transfer casualties from the front to better facilities in the rear. The large open tank deck was ideal for this function. These are Marines somewhere in the Pacific. Another of the photos displayed on the 512 that Dad had copies of. The LST Home Port has this same picture identified as "LST 614-09" so that's possibly the one in this photo.

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Subject: Pontoons on LST's


Author:
Paul Sullenberger
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Date Posted: 07/31/09 13:47:29

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Another informational photo from the 512 demonstrating the capabilities of the LST. The second picture is the caption from the back.

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Subject: EARTH FROM SPACE !!!


Author:
OSD
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Date Posted: 07/29/09 17:39:17

You will like looking at the earth from space. this website has a world map with dots on it, click on a dot and you will view that map, then click on a dot on the map and you will see choices of images from that area. select one and view it. you can enlarge the image too. PLAY WITH IT A BIT .

the link is EARTH FROM SPACE

OSD

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Subject: Link to page about Pacific Naval Battles of WWII


Author:
OSD
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Date Posted: 07/27/09 17:38:11

Lots of information on this page, great details !.

Pacific Naval Battles of WWII

Old Sea Dog

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Subject: DVD of US LST Association


Author:
Buddy LST 1126
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Date Posted: 07/26/09 02:53:49

I just received the DVD published by the US LST Association. Wow, what a job this must have been, getting all that information from day one to now. I've not been through the whole DVD, but what I've seen, is good. The price of $25.00 is most reasonable and the content is worth thousand times more. I always read the stories or letters to the editor, and many times went back to re-read them. Now I can sit at my computer desk and really enjoy without having to go from page to page on the Scuttlebutt Newspaper. As with any copying, the photos loose a bit of clarity, but I found them still viewable for the most part. A neat part of the DVD is the search. You can go directly to a ship number or person's name, or even an event by just typing in what you're interested in seeing. I congratulate the US LST Association for getting this accomplished. No doubt it cost a bit, but hopefully those costs will be recouped and more. In addition, having this DVD to pass along or around to interested parties and to have it for posterity is great. I understand the Navy Historical site will be receiving this information for their records too. Lots of history maintained. I believe every LST veteran should get one of these to keep the history alive in his or her family.

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Subject: To all my Talk Deck buddies...


Author:
SeaBat
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Date Posted: 07/19/09 11:25:21

I am asking your forgiveness at being so quiet lately... my LST Week duties are keeping me very busy and I haven't had much (read: any) spare time.

I miss you all lots and look forward to LST Week.. but look forward to being back here too.

I'm doing fine.. miss you all bunches.. but from all of you I've learned that attention to duty is important. So I am finishing up final details - you can expect a full report after the 8th of August! I'll pop in and read your posts and look at the photos as time permits. Keep the great discussions and sharing going while I'm in and out.

OSD.. You have the Duty! Buddy and Cloverleaf are your OOD.... SeaBat is on leave until 8 August. (You did get my request for leave, didn't you????)

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Subject: Re: buddy you and i are ood.


Author:
Buddy
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Date Posted: 07/20/09 03:52:37

OOD I thought was Officer of the Deck. I r not one.

Are you sure it's not ODD?

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Subject: Re: Message for OSD


Author:
Buddy LST 1126
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Date Posted: 07/17/09 02:23:35

Old Sea Dog, you left off your first ship "Old Iron Sides"

:-)

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      • Right -- OSD, 07/17/09 05:10:59

Subject: Message for OSD


Author:
Brian L. Miller
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Date Posted: 07/16/09 11:04:55

OSD,

I posted a reply to your posting about LST-594, your dad's ship. I'm not sure if you saw my reply, but my grandfather was also a coxswain on this ship during WWII. I have a definite interest in the photographs and would like to know if the other sailors are identified.

Respectfully,
Brian L. Miller

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Subject: SHAD


Author:
OSD
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Date Posted: 07/16/09 15:51:19

Nerve Gas Spray

Threats of chemical and biological warfare led the U.S. Department of Defense to start "Project 112" from 1963 to the early 1970s. Part of the effort involved spraying different ships and hundreds of Navy sailors with nerve agents such as sarin and VX, in order to test the effectiveness of decontamination procedures and safety measures at the time. The Pentagon revealed the details of the Project Shipboard Hazard and Defense (SHAD) project in 2002, and the Veterans Administration began studying possible health effects among sailors who participated in SHAD. This was just one of many chemical warfare experiments conducted by the U.S. military, starting with volunteer tests involving mustard gas in World War II.
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So thats what they were doing when they sprayed the LST 1165, now I know.
OSD

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Subject: THE scholar of LST 325 history


Author:
SeaBat
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Date Posted: 07/12/09 09:23:29

is our shipmate, Dave Bronson. His father was a WWII LST 325 plankowner. During Dave's exhaustive research regarding LST 325, he interviewed many of the plankowners in depth. They provided him with photographs, documentation regarding the ship and a new family. Those of you who have researched your own relatives LST's know exactly what I mean. Dave is the leading authority on LST 325 history and provided it to us within the pages of Mosier's Raiders and in the History section of this website.

Dave has been successful in having LST 325 added as a group under Entertainment/Arts and Books/Literature on FaceBook. This is great advertisement for the ship - those who are scouting around for places to go can easily be shown the advantages of visiting! Check it out!!!

http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=119385441158


There is also another 'just for fun' page - it's also well done! I don't know Jonathan Johnson, but it's easy to see he loves the ship as we all do!

http://www.facebook.com/home.php#/group.php?gid=72220550310&ref=ts

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Subject: A Soldier's Rant


Author:
Paul Sullenberger
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Date Posted: 07/ 8/09 13:16:50

I can't vouch for the validity of this, I don't know who "Isaac" is, and don't even know if he even exists, or is a soldier in Iraq. But a friend forwarded this one to me, and regardless of the circumstances, it says something that needed to be said...

WRITTEN BY A SOLDIER IN IRAQ.
Okay, I need to rant.

I was just watching the news, and I caught part of a report on Michael Jackson . As we all know, Jackson died the other day. He was an entertainer who performed for decades. He made millions, he spent millions, and he did a lot of things that make him a villain to many people.
I understand that his death would affect a lot of people, and I respect those people who mourn his death, but that isn't the point of my rant.
Why is it that when ONE man dies, the whole of America loses their minds with grief. When a man dies whose only contribution to the country was to ENTERTAIN people, the American people find the need to flock to a memorial in Hollywood , and even Congress sees the need to hold a "moment of silence" for his passing?

Am I missing something here? ONE man dies, and all of a sudden he's a freaking martyr because he entertained us for a few decades? What about all those SOLDIERS who have died to give us freedom? All those Soldiers who, knowing that they would be asked to fight in a war,still raised their hands and swore to defend the Constitution and the United States of America. Where is their moment of silence? Where are the people flocking to their graves or memorials and mourning over them because they made the ultimate sacrifice? Why is it when a Soldier dies, there are people saying "good riddance," and "thank God for IEDs?" When did this country become so calloused to the sacrifice of GOOD MEN and WOMEN, that they can arbitrarily blow off their deaths, and instead, throw themselves into mourning for a "Pop Icon?"

I think that if they are going to hold a moment of silence IN CONGRESS for Michael Jackson, they need to hold a moment of silence for every service member killed in Iraq and Afghanistan . They need to PUBLICLY recognize every life that has been lost so that the American people can live their callous little lives in the luxury and freedom that WE, those that are living and those that have gone on, have provided for them.

But, wait, that would take too much time, because there have been so many willing to make that sacrifice. After all, we will never make millions of dollars. We will never star in movies, or write hit songs that the world will listen too. We only shed our blood, sweat and tears so that people can enjoy what they have.

Sorry if I have offended, but I needed to say it. Feel free to pass this along if you want.

Remember these five words the next time you think of someone who is serving in the military: "So that others may
live..."


Isaac

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Subject: The Sullenberger Brothers


Author:
Paul Sullenberger
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Date Posted: 07/ 6/09 13:45:17

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This article appeared in the Piqua (Ohio) Daily Call in the summer of 1945.

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Subject: Landing Craft Over Niagara Falls, Almost


Author:
OSD
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Date Posted: 07/ 6/09 08:29:14

In the spring of 1942 the United States began a program for the mass-production of landing craft for the 1943 cross-Channel attack as envisaged in the Marshall Memorandum. The difficulties of expanding a comparatively small landing craft fleet into one for major amphibious operations were enormous. The Navy, which was to co-ordinate the program, and many of the shipyards that were to carry it out were almost wholly lacking in experience. The program was superimposed on already swollen naval construction schedules. Contracts therefore had to be let to small boatyards and manufacturing companies for whom the construction problems posed were unprecedented. The LCT's and LST's were built on inland waterways and it became necessary to find and train crews to sail them to Atlantic ports. The U. S. Coast Guard, which formed the Ferry Command in July, undertook this task with almost no technically competent personnel.

Typical of the greenness prevailing to some extent throughout the landing craft program was the story of a young Ferry Command skipper who, piloting his craft down the Niagara River at night, missed the turning into the Erie Canal and, despite warnings from the shore, sailed serenely toward the falls. By luck he ran aground a few hundred yards from the brink. He blandly reported afterward that he had seen the warning lights at the point where he missed the turning but had paid no attention because he could not figure out what they meant.

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Subject: LST 512


Author:
Paul Sullenberger
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Date Posted: 07/ 5/09 13:34:28

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LST 512 going downriver on the Ohio, under the Market Street Bridge at Steubenville, OH, Oct. 26-28, 1945.

It would be 58 years before the bow of another LST would part the waters of the Ohio. Like the 512, the 325 would show America the machines and men who saved the world in the years between Dec. 7, 1941, and September 2, 1945. And maybe just as importantly, showcase one of the most unique and versatile ships ever built. As the introduction to the History Channel's program "Hero Ships - LST's" noted, they weren't even given a name, just a number, but without them, the war might have been lost.

Winston Churchill was quoted as saying "It seems that the fate of two great nations, indeed that of the world itself, depends on some G*$$@m thing called an LST."

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Subject: LST 512


Author:
Paul Sullenberger
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Date Posted: 07/ 4/09 14:09:00

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After visiting the Great Lakes, the 512 came back down the Illinois River from Chicago to the Mississippi, then to St. Louis MO. These are views of St. Louis from the deck of the 512. The second one shows the start of the historic Santa Fe trail - The small brick building in the riverbank. This area is now occupied by the Gateway Arch.
Dad was due to get processed out within a few days of the demonstration in St. Louis. His replacement had arrived on board, and he had been relieved of all duties pending separation. However, the CO, still harboring a grudge over the egg incident in Bay City, would not sign the orders to separate him from the ship so he could stay in St. Louis, so Dad continued with the ship as a passenger, until it got to Pittsburgh. He then returned to St. Louis by train to be processed out.

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Subject: LST 512


Author:
Paul Sullenberger
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Date Posted: 07/ 4/09 14:25:51

Photobucket

LST 512 on the Monongahela River at Pittsburgh, PA. On the return trip down the Ohio, she would stop at most major river cities. The DUKW got "lost" in Cincinnati for a few hours. There was a change of command, Lt. Brock was relieved of duty and Lt. Calvin Stevens became CO. The recruiting division of the Navy took over responsibility for the ship and exhibition as a recruiting tool for the postwar Navy.

I believe that the caption on the photo refers to the visitors in Pittsburgh only. By the time the 512 reached Pittsburgh, over 1.5 million people had visited, by the time she ended her tour in New Orleans in January 1946, she had hosted over 2 million visitors

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Subject: HAPPY FOURTH OF JULY!!!!


Author:
SeaBat
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Date Posted: 07/ 4/09 12:10:04

While we are busy with all of the fun activities of the day - family, festivals and fireworks - take just a moment to remember all of the Patriots who risked life and limb...

In 1776, the Civil War, World War I and II, Korea, VietNam, the Gulf War and Iraqi Freedom... and all of the times in between. Our Military has always done an outstanding job of protecting us and their Country. The least we can do is give pause, prayer and pride in what they accomplished. We owe them a very great debt of gratitude.

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Subject: Re: UjuJSXDvISGDN


Author:
cloverleaf
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Date Posted: 07/ 4/09 05:21:07

hay!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
don't you know when u r not wanted?????????????????????
get out stay out.!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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Subject: ANOTHER DAMN UKRANIAN !


Author:
OSD
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Date Posted: 07/ 4/09 04:30:48

Dobrzyn: KISS MY AMERICAN ASS !
OSD

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Subject: LST 512


Author:
Paul Sullenberger
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Date Posted: 06/30/09 08:10:53

Photobucket

This map shows the voyage of the 512 as it brought the war in the Pacific to the inland waterways and the industrial heartland, where LST's were built, and where the factories produced the materials needed for the war effort. Cities with a star were where the 512 visited for display only. A dot by the city indicates that it also did a mock amphibious landing, complete with "off shore bombardment" aerial bombing and strafing, USMC assault forces landing, followed by the 512 "dropping the ramp" and discharging tanks and equipment. One of the Shermans on board was equipped with a flamethrower, and was dubbed "Belching Betty."

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Subject: Solomon Islands Map


Author:
OSD
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Date Posted: 03/18/09 15:40:05


To help get a perspective of the area. Iron Bottom Sound is the under water site of much of the Japanese Navy and some of our ships too. Our Bombers caught them at anchor and sank lots of ships. Estimates say there are about 80 ships on the bottom of Iron Bottom Sound.
OSD

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Subject: Soundies (remember them ?)


Author:
Old Sea Dog
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Date Posted: 02/28/09 16:59:44

Soundies were music films of current bands and singers that were played on a machine that looked like a jukebox with a small movie screen. The selection was great and we all thought "Wow, This is really the future". Well they did'nt last long but examples of the music films are still around. Here is one of my favorites.The Modernaires - Jukebox Saturday Night (Soundie)


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Subject: Re: Happy Fourth Of July!!!


Author:
Buddy LST 1126
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Date Posted: 07/ 4/08 08:08:19

Saw this before, but it's a good refreshing view.

I also like the new Header Photo SeaBat.

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Subject: From my friend Bernie


Author:
SeaBat
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Date Posted: 12/21/07 23:59:57

Many of you have already read this, but for those who haven't, it's one of the most thought provoking pieces I've seen. I didn't check it through Snopes to see if it was true - whether it is or not, the message it sends is crystal clear.... so to all Veterans... THANK YOU AND MERRY CHRISTMAS!

"I am a doctor specializing in the Emergency Departments of the only two military Level One-Trauma Centers, both in San Antonio , TX and they care for civilian Emergencies as well as military personnel. San Antonio has the largest military retiree population in the world living here. As a military doctor, I work long hours and the pay is less than glamorous. One tends to become jaded by the long hours, lack of sleep, food, family contact and the endless parade of human suffering passing before you. The arrival of another ambulance does not mean more pay, only more work.

Most often, it is a victim from a motor vehicle crash.
Often it is a person of dubious character who has been shot or stabbed. With our large military retiree population, it is often a nursing home patient. Even with my enlisted service and minimal combat experience in Panama , I have caught myself groaning when the ambulance brought in yet another sick, elderly person from one of the local retirement centers that cater to military retirees. I had not stopped to think of what citizens of this age group represented.

I saw 'Saving Private Ryan.' I was touched deeply. Not so much by the carnage, but by the sacrifices of so many. I was touched most by the scene of the elderly survivor at the graveside, asking his wife if he'd been a good man. I realized that I had seen these same men and women coming through my Emergency Dept. and had not realized what magnificent sacrifices they had made. The things they did for me and everyone else that has lived on this planet since the end of that conflict are priceless.

Situation permitting, I now try to ask my patients about their experiences. They would never bring up the subject without the inquiry. I have been privileged to an amazing array of experiences, recounted in the brief minutes allowed in an Emergency Dept. encounter. These experiences have revealed the incredible individuals I have had the honor of serving in a medical capacity, many on their last admission to the hospital.

There was a frail, elderly woman who reassured my young enlisted medic, trying to start an IV line in her arm. She remained calm and poised, despite her illness and the multiple needle-sticks into her fragile veins. She was what we call a 'hard stick.' As the medic made another attempt, I noticed a number tattooed across her forearm. I touched it with one finger and looked into her eyes. She simply said, ' Auschwitz .' Many of later generations would have loudly and openly berated the young medic in his many attempts. How different was the response from this person who'd seen unspeakable suffering.

Also, there was this long retired Colonel, who as a young officer had parachuted from his burning plane over a Pacific Island held by the Japanese. Now an octogenarian, he had a minor cut on his head from a fall at his home where he lived alone. His CT scan and suturing had been delayed until after midnight by the usual parade of high priority ambulance patients. Still spry for his age, he asked to use the phone to call a taxi, to take him home, then he realized his ambulance had brought him without his wallet. He asked if he could use the phone to make a long distance call to his daughter who lived 7 miles away. With great pride we told him that he could not, as he'd done enough for his country and the least we could do was get him a taxi home, even if we had to pay for it ourselves. My only regret was that my shift wouldn't end for several hours, and I couldn't drive him myself.

I was there the night MSgt. Roy Benavidez came through the Emergency Dept. for the last time. He was very sick. I was not the doctor taking care of him, but I walked to his bedside and took his hand. I said nothing. He was so sick, he didn't know I was there. I'd read his Congressional Medal of Honor citation and wanted to shake his hand. He died a few days later.

The gentleman who served with Merrill's Marauders, the survivor of the Bataan Death March, the survivor of Omaha Beach; the 101 year old World War I veteran; the former POW held in frozen North Korea; the former Special Forces medic - now with non-operable liver cancer; the former Viet Nam Corps Commander.

I remember these citizens. I may still groan when yet another ambulance comes in, but now I am much more aware of what an honor it is to serve these particular men and women.

I have seen a Congress who would turn their back on these individuals who've sacrificed so much to protect our liberty. I see later generations that seem to be totally engrossed in abusing these same liberties, won with such sacrifice.

It has become my personal endeavor to make the nurses and young enlisted medics aware of these amazing individuals when I encounter them in our Emergency Dept. Their response to these particular citizens has made me think that perhaps all is not lost in the next generation.

My experiences have solidified my belief that we are losing an incredible generation, and this nation knows not what it is losing. Our uncaring government and ungrateful civilian populace should all take note. We should all remember that we must 'Earn this.' "

Written By CPT. Stephen R. Ellison, M.D. US Army

PEACE, LOVE AND LIGHT OF CHRIST BE WITH YOU.....

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