VoyForums

VoyUser Login optional ] [ Contact Forum Admin ] [ Main index ] [ Post a new message ] [ Search | Check update time | Archives: 12345678910 ]
Subject: Re: Ivy League Admissions


Author:
cadyellow
[ Next Thread | Previous Thread | Next Message | Previous Message ]
Date Posted: 17:14:08 07/06/18 Fri
In reply to: Boston Lion 's message, "Re: Ivy League Admissions" on 12:46:43 07/06/18 Fri

Overall, I continue to feel that what is so strange about the continuing trend of lower admits, is that when Harvard announces in a couple of years that they have accepted (proudly) just 3 per cent of their applicants--which is a very real possibility based on current projections--then Harvard, like other Ivy's, will have to say with a straight face that they welcome prospective students to campus for a chance to tour and consider the school has a possible choice for their college--when in reality they have a better chance to win the lottery (which by the way, is considered a corrupt set of odds in its own right). Where is the sense of irony? I don't have any easy answers to any of this, as the issues of the previous posts have made clear, nor am I trying to be that critical, but am merely posing the very odd predicament and propsect of the not-so-distant future....

[ Next Thread | Previous Thread | Next Message | Previous Message ]

Replies:
[> [> Subject: simmer down BL


Author:
holtsledge
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 21:48:33 07/06/18 Fri

My son got in the back door as a temp at probably second biggest hedge fund and now is big time trader at Cowen, no ivy pedigree (he graduated from a D-3 school) and he has earned every friggin dollar he has been paid. He started in the back room in operations and now is the man. Please stop with your anti capitalistic rants ok

You sound like second coming of Elizabeth Warren also known as Chief Spreading Bull

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
[> [> [> Subject: Re: simmer down BL


Author:
cadyellow
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 22:11:32 07/06/18 Fri

Not clear what you are referring to or who you are addressing. Perhaps you are replying to a different thread.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
[> [> [> Subject: Re: simmer down BL


Author:
Bostn Lion
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 00:23:04 07/07/18 Sat

How exactly is making cars and planes anti-capitalistic? I have to believe that you took enough econ and have enough business experience to know that it isn't. But just betting on car and plane makers, instead of actually making the stuff, will lead us nowhere and cede the field to other nations whose pursuits are more productive. The question is how one makes money--betting or doing. E.g., Ford Motor vs. Goldman Sachs.

Also, IMHO you're way off the mark in re any connection to E. Warren. She doesn't take about the de-industrialization of America. She focuses on the financial services industry itself; not its proportion of the economy in comparison with the industrial sector.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
[> [> [> Subject: Re: simmer down BL re: Wall Street Pipeline


Author:
An Observer
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 11:57:37 07/07/18 Sat

Holtsie, you know I love you but I think that you heard something from Boston Lion that he did not say. In my reading, he's not saying anything negative about capitalism. If anything, he's extolling traditional American success and dominance in manufacturing and other tangible sectors of the economy. What he's regretting is the "brain drain" of so many of the Ivy League's best and brightest to Wall Street after graduation.

As an alumnus of Goldman Sachs who still has tremendous respect and affection for the place, I agree with Boston Lion. We need more of our most capable young people to major in STEM fields and make sure America remains the most productive economy in the world.

Ironically, I think that one reason so many kids flock to Wall Street (besides the $) is the exact subject of this thread: the low acceptance rate of Wall Street investment bank recruiting programs.

We've conditioned people to equate a low acceptance rate with quality and desirability. Harvard has a five percent acceptance rate? It must be great. I want to go there. Goldman Sachs only accepts one percent of applicants? It must be even better than Harvard. I want to go there.

So many of our young people have been on the treadmill of seeking external validation from achieving admission to ever more selective institutions that, when they get to college, they just start looking around for the next lily pad to with they should jump without thinking about whether they actually want to do the job.

There was an article in The Daily Pennsylvanian not to long ago which criticized the almost knee-jerk desire of Penn students to apply to Wall Street analyst programs and move to New York without even thinking why. Something like 80% of the graduating class at Yale applied to work at Goldman not too long ago.

These kids are hard working, bright and ambitious but many of them are also lemmings.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
[> [> [> [> Subject: Re: simmer down BL re: Wall Street Pipeline


Author:
Calvin
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 12:14:38 07/07/18 Sat

On the one hand, you and BL have an important point about the mindset of the young generation, and our cultural veneration of wealth.

On the other hand, IMO, BL goes too far in slamming the value of an entire industry. Those manufacturing, tech and other companies do require - yes - capital markets to prosper. And what motivates most founders and technicians to create value is the prospect of a reward those markets can offer (Wall Street offers bonuses, companies offer options. Same difference.) Now, if only those young masters of the universe learned a little humility and stopped wearing designer suspenders.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
[> [> [> [> [> Subject: Re: simmer down BL re: Wall Street Pipeline


Author:
Boston Lion
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 12:54:18 07/07/18 Sat

An Observer: Thank you for correctly interpreting my post. Spot on. Last I checked, and in the econ and history that I've read, Henry Ford was not just a capitalist but an uber capitalist, so my post was clearly not anti-capitalist. H: To create the capitalist empire that you mistakenly think I'm tearing down, what type do you think is more valuable, the Henry Fords and William Boeings of the world or the Bernie Madoffs, Michael Milkens, and Hank Paulsons? Clue: You can't bet on a game if there's no game to bet on.

Calvin: I agree with you and am not really slamming an entire industry. What I'm saying is that if our economy were a car, it's way out of balance in a way that it didn't used to be--the betting side now way outweighs the doing side. If not fixed, the car's going into the ditch.

Another analogy might be if you enter a football stadium, would you rather be on the field playing or in the bleachers spectating and betting? Inventors/engineers/manufacturers are the football players, and financiers are the spectators.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
[> [> [> [> [> [> Subject: Re: simmer down BL re: Wall Street Pipeline


Author:
Fla Lion (Happy Fla Lion)
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 11:16:57 07/08/18 Sun

Where are we out of balance? https://blog.gesrepair.com/top-10-manufacturing-countries/

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
[> [> [> [> [> [> [> Subject: Re: simmer down BL re: Wall Street Pipeline


Author:
Boston Lion
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 18:18:49 07/10/18 Tue

Check our trade imbalances going back from many years now.

U.S. 1958: Car, TV, washer, fridge: U.S., U.S., U.S., U.S.

U.S. 2018: Car, TV, washer, fridge, everything else: Jap/Kor/Ger, Kor/Jap, U.S./Kor (and Kor climbing just like the cars did years ago), U.S./Kor (climbing just like the cars), China.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
[> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> Subject: Re: simmer down BL re: Wall Street Pipeline


Author:
Fla Lion
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 19:00:32 07/10/18 Tue

Well I guess being projected number one in the world with the percent of the economy devoted to manufacturing the lowest of the contenders, which means a super efficient manufacturing sector based on robotics and IT, doesn't mean anything. Who knew.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
[> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> Subject: Re: simmer down BL re: Wall Street Pipeline


Author:
Boston Lion
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 23:30:29 07/10/18 Tue

Watch the cars in an American film from the 1950s or 1960s. Then go outside and count the foreign-nameplate cars whizzing by on the highway or parked in the mall lots. Or, maybe, count the number of American automotive bankruptcies in the past ten years, or the number of AmerIcan household electronics companies that have gone tits up in the past 40 years, or steel companies, or camera companies, or . . . . Seeing any trends?

Then spend some time in Detroit and compare what you see to the scene at an export shipping dock in Shenzhen. Loads of data there. Who knew?

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
[> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> Subject: Re: simmer down BL re: Wall Street Pipeline


Author:
Fla Lion
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 13:09:25 07/12/18 Thu

Sorry to upset you. I have trouble understanding how moving to number one in the world for manufacturing by 2020, as determined by Deloitte, means we are unbalanced and in jeopardy. I should think that if we were at number ten and 50% of our economy were devoted to manufacturing we would be unbalanced. But we are at 12% in the manufacturing sector at number two in the world, per Deloitte, and moving to number one. If your trend lines were correct I think we would be headed the other way. But you seem to know a lot more about the manufacturing sector, where I spent a number of years, than I and Deloitte do.

It is far easier to make a lot of money on Wall Street a lot more quickly than in the manufacturing sector. Ivy grads are smart so many follow the money and shorter timeline on Wall Street. Doesn't mean a lot of other non-ivy/non-Northeast state grads aren't going into or supporting the manufacturing sector and doing a great job at maintaining our status. But I will defer to you and pray that we can overcome our deficiencies.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
[> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> Subject: Re: simmer down BL re: Wall Street Pipeline


Author:
Boston Lion
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 19:18:33 07/12/18 Thu

Not upsetting me at all. Just puzzled by the fact that, setting aside the vast differences between Mass. and Fla., we are still both in the U.S. but appear to be getting vastly divergent reads on what's been going on here for the past half century. Apparently, Delioitte hasn't been to Detroit lately, or Guangdong for that matter, or heard of the moniker "Rust Belt." If we're such a manufacturing juggernaut, why has everything under my Christmas tree for the past 30 years had this funny little saying molded into the plastic: "Made in China,", why did GM go bankrupt, why is Chrysler now Italian-owned, why is GE on the ropes, why is every construction site loaded with Kubota gear, and why does everything in the Costco TV section say "Samsung"?

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
[> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> Subject: Re: simmer down BL re: Wall Street Pipeline


Author:
Fla Lion
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 11:25:54 07/13/18 Fri

I lived and worked in MA, except for college and the service, my entire life before retiring to FL.

Extrapolation is a dangerous game. I wouldn't extrapolate the size and relativity of any national economy from what is under my Christmas tree or at Costco, where most everything says Kirkland and not Samsung. If you think Deloitte doesn't know what it is talking about that is fine. I think Deloitte's study is valuable.

By the way the US military doesn't have a lot of foreign manufactured vehicles or aircraft in its inventory. Military procurement and sales to allies in and of itself is a huge contributor to US manufacturing. In a different vein, US manufacturing has had to compete against low overseas wage and benefit competition with extremely efficient productivity. That means in many ways the generally invisible robotics and IT components, themselves contributors to the manufacturing sector, have reached Gladwell's tipping point allowing the US to remain a world leader. As a humorous point, a huge amount of that flexible and molded plastic packaging you use everyday and under your Christmas tree came from machines manufactured in the US and, yes, sold to China and other countries.

As to why the companies you mentioned went the way they did, I would say mostly because of what Joseph Schumpeter called the "creative destruction" of capitalism. Thomas McCraw wrote a terrific book about Schumpeter and his theories. You would enjoy reading it.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
[> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> Subject: Re: simmer down BL re: Wall Street Pipeline


Author:
Boston Lion
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 12:41:49 07/13/18 Fri

I agree with you that extrapolation can be dangerously misleading. One or two disappointing data points may be overlooked as not truly reflectIive of a more profound underlying reality. But there have been SO MANY data points all pointing in the same worrisome direction for SO MANY years across SO MANY industrial sectors that, IMHO, continuing to believe with Deloitte that "all is well" strikes me as, at best, wishful thinking and, at worst, flat-out denial.

I'm familiar with the concept of creative destruction.

Although you may think that I don't sound like it, I truly do hope that your view is the correct one. I've just spent so much time witnessing the severe hollowing out of our Rust Belt (worked in the auto/aero sector), the prodigious muscling up in Asia and other places, the disciplined focus of those places in getting ahead in the world, and the dispiritingly silly entertainment-centered focus of our modern American culture to have as rosy a view of our prospects as you appear to have.

Otherwise, how and why did our president win election on the slogan "Make America Great AGAIN" if there is no present problem?

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
[> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> Subject: Re: simmer down BL re: Wall Street Pipeline


Author:
Calvin
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 13:10:35 07/13/18 Fri

IMO, by getting enough people in a few key states to focus on his opponent's undeniable weaknesses and ignore his considerable flaws. Also IMO, the fact that the "base" believed what he was selling speaks more to their non-understanding as to their correctness (we'll see how that plays out in the new Trade War). Plenty of stories how people out of work in the Rust Belt refuse to change their life patterns, even minimally, to secure work elsewhere. "Greatness" indeed.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
[> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> Subject: Re: simmer down BL re: Wall Street Pipeline


Author:
Boston Lion
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 18:48:07 07/13/18 Fri

Well, whatever parlor tricks got our prez elected, the fact remains that our country is in a competitive dogfight in a global economy with formidable foes who have their more recent experiences with adversity and poverty to motivate them in ways that we, in our relative affluence, have understandably forgotten.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
[> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> Subject: Re: simmer down BL re: Wall Street Pipeline


Author:
Diogenes (Boston Lion)
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 19:13:23 07/13/18 Fri

Good point regarding our tough economic competitors.

Also agree that Hillary’s actual and attempted parlor tricks elected Trump. It was all downhill after the “Scooby Van” to Iowa and the: “Wiping? You mean like with a cloth?”

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
[> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> Subject: Re: simmer down BL re: Wall Street Pipeline


Author:
Fla Lion
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 19:59:03 07/13/18 Fri

Manufacturing basis of 1968 is not the manufacturing basis of 2018, the fifty year span. 1968 was analog. 2018 is digital. Cars had brakes operated by feet in 1968. In 2018 they are controlled by computer. You could replace a tank part in 1968 by cannibalization of other tanks in the field. Who has a spare computer in the field for a tank weapon's system in 2018 to cannibalize? Unions were dominant in manufacturing in 1968, They are relics in 2018. China, our main competitor, is minimum wage based and labor intensive in 2018 but with all sorts of rumblings about wage levels and benefits. Their labor revolution hasn't started while the US is already deep into the robotics and IT manufacturing transformation, perhaps decades ahead of its competitors and certainly ahead of China. The rust belt will transform itself through creative destruction and if not to manufacturing to something else. North Dakota is a finance center in the US, let alone a fracking center which gives cheap energy costs to US manufacturers.

The President won because of Hegel. The Obama thesis turned into the Trump antithesis. People had enough of Obama's baloney and turned to Trump's baloney. Different shiny mylar balloons but both hollow as all get out. As it always does, America will recalibrate its raucous caucus, create the synthesis, and move on. In Churchill's terms the US will do the right thing after it has done everything else.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
[> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> Subject: The One Inarguable Political Reality


Author:
An Observer
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 20:45:09 07/13/18 Fri

Fla Lion, it's helpful to put the current mess into historical context. Your Churchill quote is a good reminder that we have veered off the proper path and recovered before.

When Trump was first elected, I thought, "We'll just have to survive this for four years and then everything will be back to normal." Now I think it's only a 75% chance that he won't do permanent damage. This business of cozying up to Putin is unforgivable.

I don't care what your opinion is on immigration, gun control, climate change or any other controversial topic. The one inarguable political reality of our world today is that Putin means to destroy America and the West. Anybody who can't see that is guilty of stupidity or treason.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
[> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> Subject: Re: This Time's Different


Author:
Boston Lion
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 10:29:38 07/14/18 Sat

All good points. My one comment about the likelihood of our recovering "again" is that, unlike the decades right after WWII, when we were "the last (and, more important, ONLY) man standing," now there are many other striving nations with which we must compete, and one of them is so populous that there are four of them grinding away for every one of us. To paraphrase another Churchill quite, never in recorded history have so many risen so far in so short a period. China's making a real "recovery" from a long slumber and they're not f'ing around.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
[> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> Subject: ENOUGH ALREADY!


Author:
Observer
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 10:18:11 07/17/18 Tue

Can we just have done with all this inappropriate political talk on an Ivy League sports site? Mr/ Moderator - please delete all the off-topic posts!

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
[> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> Subject: Re: simmer down BL re: Wall Street Pipeline


Author:
Fla Lion
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 11:13:58 07/14/18 Sat

The attached should be of some help. https://countryeconomy.com/countries/compare/china/usa China has a ways to go to catch us and their demographics are working against them.

The only thing I worry about is debt. Debt levels really stand out in the summary above. I think it insidious in all walks of life when it turns to excess, as it did in 2007 and will again. I think the inarguable political reality is a riff on Samuel Beckett's line in the Plough and the Stars (I think). "The generals love their guns like the children love their candy." To which I add like the politicians love their taxes and debt. Lots of people want to destroy America but, like Putin, they don't really have the means. Russia has enough difficulty maintaining sustainable demographics so it is only a matter of time before they take themselves out of the game. Plus they are Putin dependent, not infrastructure dependent. Once Putin goes they start all over. The Russian merry-go-round, why they never achieve all that they could.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
[> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> Subject: Re: simmer down BL re: Wall Street Pipeline


Author:
Boston Lion
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 11:33:15 07/14/18 Sat

Americans who don't take China's rise seriously enough might want to ponder Neville Chamberlain and others in that time who were slow to wake to the new realities to their east. Not a perfect analogy, to be sure, but still perhaps at least partially instructive. It helps if you've been to China and seen its national bird--the construction crane.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
[> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> Subject: Re: simmer down BL re: Wall Street Pipeline


Author:
sparman
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 17:07:50 07/14/18 Sat

China's path is not all roses. It has some serious internal demographic issues. They have been overbuilding for a while, turning arable cropland - of which they have surprisingly little - into new cities, some of which are nearly empty, while throwing agricultural workers into the street, and their former one-child policy has created a seriously aging population. Lots to play out.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
[> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> Subject: Re: simmer down BL re: Wall Street Pipeline


Author:
Fla Lion
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 21:26:25 07/14/18 Sat

By way of nothing, arguably Nixon and Kissinger saved China. They sold/provided China five (?) nitrogen fertilizer plants in the 70s. Before that China agriculture existed on night soil. It couldn't feed itself, a recipe (no pun intended) for disaster since otherwise China would have become dependent on external sources for sustainable food. Perhaps the most mesmerizing book anyone of our generation could ever read is "Mastermind, The Rise and Fall of Fritz Haber...." by Daniel Charles. Anyone on this forum who hasn't read it should.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
[> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> Subject: Re: simmer down BL re: Wall Street Pipeline


Author:
Fla Lion
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 22:15:33 07/14/18 Sat

This is as dry as burnt toast. But it is how the world survives. Or doesn't.

https://www.motherjones.com/files/v14n2_2.pdf

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
[> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> Subject: Re: simmer down BL re: Wall Street Pipeline


Author:
Diogenes (Fla Lion)
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 09:47:45 07/15/18 Sun

Thank you for that article. Did not know any of that. Another arrow for the “knowledge quiver”.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
[> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> Subject: Re: simmer down BL re: Wall Street Pipeline


Author:
joiseyfan
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 11:49:17 07/14/18 Sat

In the medium term, Russia is of far more concern because their only long-term resource — their people — is withering away. China has so much untapped potential internally they need to stay busy just tending to their populace. Which isn’t to say Xi’s power putsch isn’t concerning, because it is. He still ain’t Putin though; obviously, the entire KGB should have been executed the day after the Soviet Union fell.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
[> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> Subject: China and Russia


Author:
An Observer
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 14:49:09 07/14/18 Sat

Here is the big difference between China and Russia.

When your civilization is 5000 years old, your population has accounted for 20% of the human beings on the planet for all five of those millennia and you have survived innumerable wars, famine and other disasters, you tend to take the long view. The Chinese believe that they will be here forever.

The Chinese want to dominate the world for sure, but they want to dominate economically. They don't want to eliminate the rest of us; they want to turn the rest of us into customers, which of course they are well on their way to doing. The Chinese are confident that, in the long run, they'll be fine because they'll just outwork us.

In sharp contrast, the psyche of the Russian people is characterized by insecurity and is built on their collective memory of Napoleon and Hitler.

The Chinese have been here for five millennia and believe that they will be here forever; the Russians know that twice in the past two centuries, they came close to being wiped off the face of the earth. Had Hitler won the war, the Russians would have been sent to the furnaces on the next train.

The Russians want to eliminate the rest of us before we can do it to them, because they believe the West wants to do just that. Putin doesn't distinguish between the US and Great Britain today compared to Hitler in 1941 or Napoleon in 1812. Putin is the tip of the Russian sword; he doesn't want to turn us into customers, he wants to destroy us.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
[> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> Subject: Re: China and Russia


Author:
Boston Lion
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 21:58:03 07/15/18 Sun

I think China, and not Russia, poses the more potent challenge. An economic powerhouse can eventually get rich enough to buy itself into the first rank of military powers while still keeping the wealth-creation engine running.

However, a country that is militarily strong but not economically strong will eventually bankrupt itself trying to keep up militarily, e.g., the USSR. I believe the term is "imperial overreach."

Russia has prodigious technological bench strength and should never be underestimated, but its governmental systems have not effectively harnessed, channeled, and developed that strength. And corruption has taken a heavy toll on its people. To be sure, China also has corruption, but it seems to have a better way of curbing that impulse just enough so that it doesn't run amok and spoil the party (not the Party).

Based on what I've seen in both countries, China has the better long-term economic prospects, so I believe that they will ultimately be the more powerful and dangerous competitor/adversary. Wallet first, guns to follow.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
[> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> Subject: Re: China and Russia


Author:
Diogenes (Boston Lion)
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 08:30:01 07/16/18 Mon

As one knowledgeable person put it to me: China has 600,000,000 people living in the 17th century, while Russia has 75,000,000 people living in the mid- 20th century.

The internal costs of modernizing both countries far exceed their territorial or trading ambitions.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
[> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> Subject: Re: China and Russia


Author:
joiseyfan
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 11:36:52 07/16/18 Mon

Dio’s note points toward another important consideration: inertia. China might be living in the (let’s say, updated) 19th century, but they’re advancing rapidly. And they have a semi-modern military, also advancing.

Russia is stuck in 1916, really stuck. And they have a modern but hardly cutting edge military, bleeding the country dry along with the oligarchs. The chance for any advancement without huge gifts from outside is minimal.

The wild cards: Xi’s putsch, which flies in the face of recent Chinese advances, and the simple fact that Putin is not immortal, and clearly doesn’t give a rat’s patoot what happens after he goes.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
[> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> Subject: Re: China and Russia


Author:
An Observer
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 12:45:59 07/16/18 Mon

I gotta agree with all three of Boston Lion, Dio and Joisey.

As I said before, China is playing the long game. And they have the resources to win: an industrious, highly educated workforce with a high savings rate that lends itself to capital investment at a low interest rate. They're spending on their military, but only a reasonable amount driven by national and nationalistic pride. China knows that, after centuries when it always had to fear the Japanese and Western powers, for the first time in its history, they can invest and develop economically confident that they are not threatened militarily.

Russia, on the other hand, has a population that is withering in size and poorly allocated among economic opportunities. As a result, the population is angry much like an Appalachian coal miner who wonders why his livelihood is gone. The male half of the Russian population is drinking itself to death like Nicholas Cage's character in "Leaving Las Vegas" (also starring Harvard grad Elisabeth Shue). Russia's economy is built upon an asset whose price is controlled by others and denominated in a foreign currency. American shale drillers and Elon Musk are both working on technology to keep driving the real price of oil lower and lower.

If geopolitics is a poker game, China knows that, in the long run, it has the cards to win. It can afford to be patient and play methodically. Russia's chip pile is slowly withering away and it may be tempted to shove "all in" soon. That's the danger to the West. Russia has a unique asset in Donald Trump right now, destabilizing the West from within. Who's to say that Putin won't conclude, "Now is the rare opportunity. Let's raise all in and _______." What is _______? All out electronic warfare on Western internet infrastructure? Their options are limited only by their imagination and the imagination of a desperate man is usually very creative.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
[> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> Subject: CAN YOU TAKE THE POLITICAL TALK ELSEWHERE< PLEASE?


Author:
Observer
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 10:40:56 07/17/18 Tue


[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
[> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> Subject: Re: CAN YOU TAKE THE POLITICAL TALK ELSEWHERE< PLEASE?


Author:
An Observer
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 12:27:31 07/18/18 Wed

Greetings, Observer. First of all, please don't ever stop posting on this board. Yours is, shall I say, a unique voice and this website would lose some of its, er, energy, without your regular posts.

Secondly, I'm a little surprised that you want this particular line of discussion to end, given your many previous posts which revealed your own politics. Granted, we all want this message board to be first and foremost about Ivy League sports. And so it remains. But another nice thing about this website is that there are a number of very smart people who post regularly and I genuinely like reading their opinions on topics other than sports. There are a couple of posters here who are as insightful as anybody that I know. Think of this board as a cocktail party with some very smart attendees. We love Ivy sports, but that is not our only interest in life. And of course, as is said regularly in a variety of threads, nobody is required to follow any thread which does not interest them.

Finally, not too long ago, I wrote a long and earnest message to you about Ivy League sports, specifically about Harvard basketball. I tried very hard to frame the issue in a positive and constructive light. I hoped that you would favor me with a response which had a similar tone. But you've said nothing, which of course is and shall always be your right.

So here we are. You don't respond to on-topic posts addressed to you and you object to off-topic posts. That's your prerogative, but why does anybody want to pull the punch bowl when there are other people gathered around enjoying themselves with an interesting conversation?

Life is short. Let's try to have fun.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
[> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> Subject: gee i thought it was


Author:
holtsledge
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 12:36:53 07/18/18 Wed

Life sux then you die LOL

Much more positive spin thanks

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
[> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> Subject: Re:


Author:
Boston Lion
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 14:03:26 07/18/18 Wed

I see it the way An Observer does.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
[> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> Subject: "Your Home For Ivy Sports Talk" - supposedly


Author:
Observer
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 15:10:56 07/18/18 Wed

I guess we're free to ignore this page caption if it suits our whim. After all, there is no absolutely no place else on the web for "very smart people" to go who feel we must "share their insights" on TRUMPTRUMPTRUMP etc.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
[> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> Subject: Re: "Your Home For Ivy Sports Talk" - supposedly


Author:
Calvin
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 20:30:44 07/18/18 Wed

It has more impact on our lives than debating whether a RB really runs a 4.21.

And I seem to remember you going on about a donation to the Engineering School, which doesn't have anything to do with sports either.

Not to mention the person in question is an ivy grad, supposedly.

But as you say, you can choose to ignore any thread that bores you and instead concentrate on important stuff like Yale Bowl bathrooms.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
[> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> Subject: Re: "Your Home For Ivy Sports Talk" - supposedly


Author:
M3
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 21:33:12 07/18/18 Wed

Excellent geopolitical discussion

Russia has all physical resources that used to be taken for granted
Food/Water/Energy/Space

China has lots of excellent Human Resources but too many of them - overpopulation

China will fair better than India over the next 50 years but the next conflict will be their desire to acquire NE Asia (Siberia) and all its natural resources

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
[> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> [> Subject: Re: "Your Home For Ivy Sports Talk" - supposedly


Author:
Observer
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 09:30:31 07/19/18 Thu

The Yale Bowl bathrooms have been ignored for years, not only by your snotty self, but by the powers-that be in the Elm City, so I wouldn't think you'd find them a topic of interest. Best stick to "geopolitics."

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
[> [> [> [> Subject: OK Ok


Author:
holtsledge
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 13:09:56 07/07/18 Sat

I stand corrected was just venting because I am extremely proud of my son and the success he has achieved all on his own with no help other than tuition from me

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
[> [> [> [> [> Subject: Re: OK Ok


Author:
Boston Lion
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 13:34:20 07/07/18 Sat

No worries. I don't dent that easily.

Justifiable fatherly pride (your piece) and earning one's OWN way (your son's piece) are both unalloyed virtues in ever shorter supply these days in these United States. Keep it up, da bot a yaz!

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
[> [> [> Subject: Four Words


Author:
joiseyfan
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 13:39:19 07/07/18 Sat

Great Recession of 2007

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]


VoyUser Login ] Not required to post.
Post a public reply to this message | Go post a new public message
* HTML allowed in marked fields.
* Message subject (required):

Name (required):

  Expression (Optional mood/title along with your name) Examples: (happy, sad, The Joyful, etc.) help)

  E-mail address (optional):

* Type your message here:


Notice: Copies of your message may remain on this and other systems on internet. Please be respectful.

[ Contact Forum Admin ]


Forum timezone: GMT-5
VF Version: 3.00b, ConfDB:
Before posting please read our privacy policy.
VoyForums(tm) is a Free Service from Voyager Info-Systems.
Copyright © 1998-2017 Voyager Info-Systems. All Rights Reserved.