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Subject: Here's How to Play Football in Law School


Author:
An Observer
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Date Posted: 14:51:10 12/22/21 Wed
In reply to: Go Green 's message, "Yes..." on 09:18:16 12/22/21 Wed

I've had more than one attorney tell me that law school in America could easily be condensed into a two-year track. They say that law students spend most of their third year interviewing for jobs and clerkships, rather than attending class.

My brother-in-law not only accepted his job shortly after his summer internship, he started it. He was working full-time at a prominent law firm in the Midwest (and living in that city) the entire third year while enrolled full-time at Yale Law School. He laughs about it, like "Why would I waste a year of my life going to class? Who does that?" Yet there I was in the New Haven audience, clapping politely as he received his degree in late May. And I think Yale is one of the better law schools.

So maybe the way to play one's extra year of athletic eligibility would be to study hard for two years, lock down the starting job for a big time firm, then spend third year of law school starting at quarterback for Stanford or Vanderbilt.

I am guessing that one reason why law school lasts three years is that lawyers want to give their profession more of the gravitas of medicine. That of course was the only reason that the traditional LLB degree was changed, after over a century, to the more substantial sounding JD degree. Indeed, "Doctor of Laws" is a pretty thinly veiled attempt to appear more doctory.

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[> [> [> [> Subject: Re: Here's How to Play Football in Law School


Author:
Old Lion (Not 1L)
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Date Posted: 16:42:30 12/22/21 Wed

The first year of any good law school is an incredible grind, and the results of first year grades will largely determine career paths and opportunities. Do well in first year and the world is your oyster; bomb the first year and look for another career path. Second year is an opportunity for redemption. Third year is always the subject of debate as to its value but if it is eliminated then second year no longer provides the same opportunity for redemption. So unless you are a combination of Oliver Wendell Holmes, Louis D. Brandeis and Whizzer White you cannot play football for any D 1 school while attending and succeeding at your 1 L studies.

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