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Hello, Welcome to this forum for discussing ASP.net/C# Issues. Here you can post your queries/information to share with others/answers.
www.geocities.com/josekonoor

Subject: ASP.Net, C# code for saving/downloading Images


Author:
Jose Varghese
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 01:37:32 03/14/07 Wed


Response.ClearHeaders();
Response.ClearContent();
Response.ContentType = "image/jpeg";
Response.AddHeader("Content-Disposition", "attachment;filename=TrainingByTopicSubTopic.Jpeg");
imgFancy.SaveTo(Response.OutputStream, System.Drawing.Imaging.ImageFormat.Jpeg);

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Subject: web design


Author:
princess275
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Date Posted: 11:10:15 02/14/06 Tue

Web sites are developed by groups of people to meet the needs of other groups of people. Unfortunately, Web design projects are often approached as a "technology problem," and projects are colored from the beginning by enthusiasms for particular Web techniques or browser plug-ins (Flash, digital media, XML, databases, etc.), not by real human or business needs. People are the key to successful Web design projects. To create a substantial web site you'll need content experts, writers, information architects, graphic designers, technical experts, and a producer or committee chair responsible for seeing the project to completion. If your website is successful it will have to be genuinely useful to your target audience, meeting their needs and expectations without being too hard to use.

Although the people who will actually use your web site will determine whether the design project is a success, ironically, those very users are the people least likely to be present and involved when your site is designed and built. Remember that the website development team should always function as an active, committed advocate for the users and their needs. Experienced committee warriors may be skeptical here: these are fine sentiments, but can you really do this design in the face of management pressures, budget limitations, and divergent stakeholder interests? Yes, you can because you have no choice if you really want your Web project to succeed. If you listen only to management directives, keep the process sealed tightly within your web development team, and dictate to imagined users what the team imagines is best for them, be prepared for failure. Involve real users, listen and respond to what they say, test your designs with them, and keep the site easy to use, and the project will be a success.

What are your web design goals?

A short statement identifying two or three goals should be the foundation of your Web site design. The statement should include specific strategies around which the Web site will be designed, how long the site design, construction, and evaluation periods will be, and specific quantitative and qualitative measures of how the success of the site will be evaluated. Building a Web site is an ongoing process, not a one-time project with static content. Long-term editorial management and technical maintenance must be covered in your budget and production plans for the site. Without this perspective your electronic publication will suffer the same fate as many corporate communications initiatives an enthusiastic start without lasting accomplishments.

Know your web design audience

The next step is to identify the potential readers of your Web site so that you can structure the site design to meet their needs and expectations. The knowledge, background, interests, and needs of users will vary from tentative novices who need a carefully structured introduction to expert "power users" who may chafe at anything that seems to patronize them or delay their access to information. A well-designed system should be able to accommodate a range of users' skills and interests. For example, if the goal of your Web site is to deliver internal corporate information, human resources documents, or other information formerly published in paper manuals, your audience will range from those who will visit the site many times every day to those who refer only occasionally to the site.

Design critiques

Each member of a web site development team will bring different goals, preferences, and skills to the project. Once the team has reached agreement on the mission and goals of the project, consensus on the overall design approach for the Web site needs to be established. The goal at this stage is to identify potential successful models in other Web sites and to begin to see the design problem from the site user's point of view.

Unfortunately, production teams rarely include members of the target audience for the Web site. And it is often difficult for team members who are not already experienced site designers to articulate their specific preferences, except in reference to existing sites. Group critiques are a great way to explore what makes a Web site successful, because everyone on the team sees each site from a user's point of view. Have each team member bring a list of a few favorite sites to the critique, and ask them to introduce their sites and comment on the successful elements of each design. In this way you will learn one another's design sensibilities and begin to build consensus on the experience that your audience will have when they visit the finished site.

sonia
web design uk
web design manchester

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Subject: ASP.Net c# measuring execution time duration


Author:
Jose Varghese
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Date Posted: 04:26:07 06/01/05 Wed

long tt = Environment.TickCount;
model.MyVariable = uctl1.LongRunningFunction();
tt = Environment.TickCount - tt;
string timeDuration = (tt/1000.0).ToString() + " Seconds";

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Subject: ASP.Net, C# code for saving/downloading Images


Author:
Save-DownloadImagesASP.NetC#
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 02:56:16 05/30/05 Mon


Response.ClearHeaders();
Response.ClearContent();
Response.ContentType = "image/jpeg";
Response.AddHeader("Content-Disposition", "attachment;filename=TrainingByTopicSubTopic.Jpeg");
imgFancy.SaveTo(Response.OutputStream, System.Drawing.Imaging.ImageFormat.Jpeg);

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Subject: ASP.Net cookies vs HttpContext (Context.Items.Add())


Author:
Jose Varghese
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Date Posted: 02:51:41 05/20/05 Fri

ASP.Net Cookies Vs HttpContext

HttpContext is normally used when data is needed in memory only at the moment of page transfer. This is the state that lives in HttpContext.Items, which only lasts for the duration of the current request, hence its characteristic of "transient". It's quickly discarded as soon as the current request has finished processing, so it doesn't impose any of the drawbacks you need to care about with Session. So it is better to use HttpContext than cookies to store inter-page state. Cookies are a bad choice for storing state.

But HttpContext will only work in conjunction with Server.Transfer. It will not work using Response.Redirect. The reason why it will not work with Response.Redirect is because Redirect results in another round trip to the client which results in a new HTTP Request and thus a new HTTPContext.

As regards to size of data HttpContext does support more size than cookies. Currently each cookie is limited to a size of 4096 bytes. Context objects allows you the flexibility to pass any kind of object from simple text to heavy objects like dataset which one cant do with cookies. Infact most of the limitations of cookies don't apply to HttpContext.

As regards to performance HttpContext does not make any problem since the request last only for the duration of the current request i.e till the time the next page is loaded. After that the object is no longer accessible and eliminates the cleaning code required in next page like the way it is required in Session.

Adding Items to Context
-----------------------
Context.Items.Add("UserId", txtUserId.Text);

Retrieving Items from Context
-----------------------------
txtUserId.Text = Context.Items["UserId"];

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Subject: Bug with Dot Net Winforms (Shortcut Key)


Author:
Jose Varghese
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Date Posted: 07:56:23 08/03/04 Tue

There is a bug with Dot Net Winforms.
The shortcut key given from one winform is invoking the button on another winform.

I reported the same to MSDN and after one month got the reply that 'it has been fixed and will be available in next version'. Till then, u have to search for alternate solutions!

http://lab.msdn.microsoft.com/productfeedback/viewfeedback.aspx?feedbackid=509a4eef-f33d-4e32-b6c2-651220d58156

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