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Subject: Archive: Hedy Lamarr, Jan. 19, 2000


Author:
Actress, inventor
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Date Posted: Sunday, January 19, 01:16:39pm

Hedy Lamarr (/ˈheɪdi/), born Hedwig Eva Maria Kiesler (November 9, 1914 January 19, 2000), was an Austrian-born American film actress and inventor who was posthumously inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame.

After a brief early film career in Czechoslovakia, including the controversial Ecstasy (1933), she fled from her husband, a wealthy Austrian ammunition manufacturer, and secretly moved to Paris. Traveling to London, she met Louis B. Mayer, head of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM) studio, who offered her a movie contract in Hollywood.

She became a star with her performance in Algiers (1938), her first film made in the United States.

Her MGM films include Lady of the Tropics (1939), Boom Town (1940), H.M. Pulham, Esq. (1941), and White Cargo (1942). Her greatest success was as Delilah in Cecil B. DeMille's Samson and Delilah (1949). She also acted on television before the release of her final film, The Female Animal (1958). She was honored with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in 1960.

At the beginning of World War II, Lamarr and composer George Antheil developed a radio guidance system for Allied torpedoes, intended to use frequency-hopping spread spectrum technology to defeat the threat of jamming by the Axis powers.

Although the US Navy did not adopt the technology until the 1960s,[6] various spread-spectrum techniques are incorporated into Bluetooth technology and are similar to methods used in legacy versions of Wi-Fi.[

Recognition of the value of this work resulted in the pair being inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame in 2014.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hedy_Lamarr

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