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Subject: ARCHIVE: March 1, 1932 ~It was 88 years ago today, Charles Lindbergh Jr., the toddler son of famed aviator, who was killed in botched kidnapping and ransom. ...


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Date Posted: Monday, March 02, 12:18:49pm


Charles Lindbergh Jr.
[ Charles Augustus Lindbergh Jr. ]
(June 22, 1930 - March 1, 1932)


On March 1, 1932, Charles Augustus Lindbergh Jr., 20-month-old son of aviator Charles Lindbergh and Anne Morrow Lindbergh, was abducted from the crib in the upper floor of his home in Highfields in East Amwell, New Jersey, United States. On May 12, the child's corpse was discovered by a truck driver by the side of a nearby road.

In September 1934, a German immigrant carpenter named Richard Hauptmann was arrested for the crime. After a trial that lasted from January 2 to February 13, 1935, he was found guilty of first-degree murder and sentenced to death. Despite his conviction, he continued to profess his innocence, but all appeals failed and he was executed in the electric chair at the New Jersey State Prison on April 3, 1936. Newspaper writer H. L. Mencken called the kidnapping and trial "the biggest story since the Resurrection." Legal scholars have referred to the trial as one of the "trials of the century". The crime spurred Congress to pass the Federal Kidnapping Act, commonly called the "Lindbergh Law", which made transporting a kidnapping victim across state lines a federal crime.

Kidnapping
At 7:30 p.m. on March 1st, 1932, the baby's father Charles Lindbergh realized his son was missing from the crib. The nurse, Betty Gow, also found that the baby was not with his mother, Anne Morrow Lindbergh, who had just come out of the bathtub. Gow then alerted Charles Lindbergh, who immediately went to the child's room, where he found the kidnapper's ransom note in an envelope on the windowsill; the note contained bad grammar and handwriting. He then took a gun and went around the house and grounds with butler Olly Whateley. They found impressions in the ground under the window of the child's room and pieces of a cleverly designed wooden ladder. They also found a baby's blanket. Whateley telephoned the Hopewell police department to inform them of the missing child. Charles Lindbergh then contacted his attorney and friend, Henry Breckinridge, and the New Jersey state police.

Within 20 minutes, police were en route to the home...

Read MORE of the kidnapping, murder, and killer's trial
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lindbergh_kidnapping#Investigation

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