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  • If I Could Just Remember His Name -- Allison M, Tue, May 31 2005, 16:40:14 (65.175.203.127)
    Hello. My name is Allison and I'm a Junior at Pembroke Academy. For an American Studies English project we had to read and comment on some war stories. After reading "If I Could Just Remember His Name" I almost cried myself. The kindness you showed on Christmas Eve by staying with that dying man was incredible. It must be hard to not remember his name, but I'm sure he was glad to have someone with him on his last Christmas Eve.

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  • From The Other Side -- Allison M, Tue, May 31 2005, 16:09:57 (65.175.203.127)
    Hello, my name is Allison and I am a student at Pembroke Academy. For our American Studies English class we were given an assignment to respond to a few stories about Vietnam. I really enjoyed reading the one titled 'From The Other Side." Recently we took a trip to Washington D.C. and one of the things we visited was the Vietnam Memorial. I stood in front of the wall, and although I did not have any family in the war I could feel its impact just standing there. How tragic it must be to have fought and lost a friend in the war, or to have been a family member of one of those brave people lost. As we go about our hectic lives in 2005 it is easy to forget those who fought and died, but the wall and these stories are good reminders of what we should be thankful for. I remembered.

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  • rock and a hard place -- Robert Deans, Tue, May 31 2005, 16:06:39 (205.188.116.202)
    all i can say is crap if that was me in that spider hole i would have probably done the same and i would have gotten a ladder or something to get my ass out of there fas just in case

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  • Camouflage -- Robert deans, Tue, May 31 2005, 16:01:05 (205.188.116.202)
    i think that this story is haliraous because it is like something me and my friends would do to eachother just because we wanted to have a good laugh

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  • Two helicopter -- Robert deans, Tue, May 31 2005, 15:52:56 (205.188.116.202)
    i think that it is awesome that something happend and it happend just like you would see only this was with no cameras or anything it was pure luck.

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  • water? you want water? -- Robert Deans, Tue, May 31 2005, 15:47:53 (205.188.116.202)
    im a student of pembroke academy doing a project on the vietnam war and i read the story water? you want water? and it reminded me of the times when i was little and we would have huge water fights in the front yard and street.

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  • Forget Me Not by Don Poss -- Samantha, Tue, May 31 2005, 12:39:57 (152.163.101.5)
    I can't even imagine how hard going to the vietnam war was. I am very grateful for everthing that, you, the vietnam veterans have done. My grandfather was a veteran to the Vietnam war. He passed away two years ago. It's hard to think that someone can live through a war and then die many years later because they couldn't survive cancer. I am so grateful of you. No one can forget the amazing things that the vietnam veterans have accomplished. Thank you!

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  • Forget Me Not by Don Poss -- Samantha, Tue, May 31 2005, 12:38:41 (152.163.101.5)
    I can't even imagine how hard going to the vietnam war was. I am very grateful for everthing that, you, the vietnam veterans have done. My grandfather was a veteran to the Vietnam war. He passed away two years ago. It's hard to think that someone can live through a war and then die many years later because they couldn't survive cancer. I am so grateful of you. Thank you!

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  • "High Flight" By John Cillespie Magee Jr -- Cody, Mon, May 30 2005, 19:49:00 (66.30.103.65)
    I was wondering if I could get some more information from John Gillespie Magee, Jr. I am studying Vietnam in my English class and I have realized that they don't say much about what happened in the skies. You hear alot about men on foot but not a whole lot about the airborne, so I was hoping that you could give me some more information. Thanks again for your bravery in all that you did while fighting in Vietnam.
    -Cody

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  • Dust Off, K-9 and Kids - Richard Cunnare -- Kaylan, Mon, May 30 2005, 19:57:51 (65.175.204.68)
    Richard Cunnare,
    It is sad to hear about things you saw and went through. It is difficult for me to see pictures, how did you deal with the real thing? Do the visions come back to you often? What helps you to cope with what you saw? What kind of work did the dogs do? You seem to really like dogs, do you have one now? If you would respond back to me I would like that very much. Thank you for serving our country.

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  • Brian Shul, "Because I Fly..." -- Cody, Mon, May 30 2005, 19:34:29 (66.30.103.65)
    Hi, my name is Cody Lewis and Im a student at Pembroke Academy in Pembroke NH. I am doing a project for my American Studies English class in order to find out more about Vietnam. We thought that the easiest way to do this would be to ask the people who were actually there, the veterans. We think very highly of everything you did for our country, risking your lives to save ours. You are the bravest people out there, and we appreciate that bravery. It may not seem like alot coming from a small town high-school student, but know that we are not the only ones who appreciate everything you have done.
    I was reading the poem "Because I Fly..." by Brian Shul and was wondering if you could give me a sense of what it was like up there in the sky fighting for our country. It seems like sometimes people forget about the ones flying in the sky, so a clearer explaination of what it was like would be great. Once again thank you for your bravery while fighting in Vietnam, and I hope to hear from you soon.
    -Cody

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  • I -- Christine, Mon, May 30 2005, 19:17:41 (152.163.101.5)
    My name is Christine and I am doing a project for my English class at school. I am not requesting for you to talk more about your story, but I would like you to listen to me. I have not been affected by this war as much as I should be, thus I have no family that went, and very little knowledge of it. What I do know and have heard is that there are not many people (vets like yourself)that are willing to talk about there stories. This is pretty explanatory, and I can imagine why you wouldn't want to talk about these horrible memories. However what I have to say is far more important. I live in New Hampshire and I am a junior in high school. I can also tell you right now that I will never grow up and be any one special, I will never do anything remarkable, and I will never do anything heroic, but you did. You risked you life for everyone, you had a kid and a wife and yet you went to war not knowing when and if you would return. Your story is amazing and you, you are already considered a hero, and although I sure that was not your purpose you are, and that right there is truly spectacular. Thank you for all you have done

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  • Heaven's Door -- Brian, Mon, May 30 2005, 17:35:52 (66.153.68.150)
    I'm doing a project for my American Studies English class and I read your story and I think it’s amazing that you didn’t fire that was the craziest story I have ever heard. And to think, you saved two lives that night.

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  • Power of a name -- Brian, Mon, May 30 2005, 17:34:44 (66.153.68.150)
    I'm doing a project for my American Studies English class and I read your story and I have been to the Vietnam Veterans wall with my class and it is a truly amazing thing to see people and how the act when reminiscing at the memorial.

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  • Water? You want water? -- Brian, Mon, May 30 2005, 17:33:29 (66.153.68.150)
    I'm doing a project for my American Studies English class and I read your story and it’s a nice change from some of the other stories I’ve read. It sounds like not all memories were bad ones.

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  • POW/MIA -- Brian, Mon, May 30 2005, 17:32:00 (66.153.68.150)
    I'm doing a project for my American Studies English class and I read your story and you said that you wondered what would have happened if you had left an “OP” at the hidden cage. First off what is an “OP” and how did you not save someone’s life by shooting the cage up.

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  • lucky, lucky -- Kati, Mon, May 30 2005, 14:39:18 (24.62.243.133)
    Patrick,
    After reading your other story, "Happy Birthday Son", and thinking how lucky you were to have escaped danger because of your son's birth, but now, after reading this one, it happens to be that luck was again on your side. I agree with the advice that you were given, because you have no right giving an order if you yourself couldn't do it. It was a brave thing to step up and volunteer to jump up on the pallets and disconnect the hook, and a lucky thing that your squad members yelled for you to get down when you were being targeted. It's also a very good thing that the pallets hadn't gone off with all the shots fired. I'm glad that with all the stories I've read about, that when there is nothing left for you to do in a situation like this, that a little bit of luck can guide you through it to save your life.

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  • happy birthday son -- Kati, Mon, May 30 2005, 14:23:46 (24.62.243.133)
    Patrick,
    First of all, I'm glad that you avoided any potential danger because of the birth of your son. It's good to hear that you were saved from being injured or even killed and to be able to return home to your son and to live out your life. It's nice to know that not all war stories are about deaths and injuries with bloody, gorey descriptions, but that sometimes, they are about a life saved, and escaping a tragidy. I hope that in August, your son's birthday means as much, or more than it did 38 years ago.

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  • rock and a hard place -- Kati, Mon, May 30 2005, 13:20:47 (24.62.243.133)
    Charles,
    First of all, I'd like to think that if I am ever in trouble that I recieve half the luck you did! But in a sense, that's what war is, some luck and some ammo. I guess it's better to know this fact upfront, especially since I'm considering joining the Army Reserves for mechanics. This is one of my favorite stories of the ones that I've read on this website because it's got an ending that doesn't end in a horrific way, but is still an excellent war story.

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  • words unspoken, truths untold -- Kati, Mon, May 30 2005, 12:57:22 (24.62.243.133)
    Claudia,
    I really enjoyed your poem, "Spoke of War?" because I also know what it's like for someone to not speak of the things that happened long ago. My grandfather was in the Korean War, and earned a purple heart, but also lost almost all of his hearing. I, however, don't even know what he did to recieve the medal, he's never talked about it, and probably never will. My dad tells me that a bomb went off and was cut badly in the neck, I'd love to hear the story first-hand one day, but I doubt that will happen. I know that if it were me instead, that I too would probably not talk about it. Knowing all that happened and all the deaths, isn't really something you want to discuss lightly over dinner. Hopefully one day these soldiers will feel free to tell their stories without the horrible memories making them feel badly, because I know I'd like to know all that happened.

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  • A Healing Wall -- Malorey, Mon, May 30 2005, 10:41:00 (24.34.69.137)
    I had no idea that a wall with a bunch of names on it could heal the anger and pain that you could have. That is truely amazing to me. I wish I could experiance that kind of miracle myself. I'm happy that the wall was able to help you, and I can really understand why you would still be a little angry with the government

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  • welcome home, soldier -- Kati, Mon, May 30 2005, 12:44:54 (24.62.243.133)
    Ed,

    It's good to hear that your duties in Vietnam were apprechiated when you arrived back here. I think it's unfortunate to hear about when soliders come home and little or no respect is shown to them, even after risking there own lives to save the lives of others. This story is uplifting and a true war story, without the blood and gore, which is good to hear from time to time. Please feel free to respond via message board or email.

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  • Camouflage -- Malorey, Mon, May 30 2005, 10:59:13 (24.34.69.137)
    I really enjoyed reading this story. It is definately one of the more positive and funny stories of the bunch. I liked how it didn't have a lot of death and other misfortunate events. You seemed like you had a good relationship with your officer.

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  • As Far As I Can See -- Malorey, Mon, May 30 2005, 10:50:38 (24.34.69.137)
    Your poem was very moving; after reading it, I had an image in my mind of people with candles standing at the wall remembering their ancestors, friends, ect. I can see miles of people, just standing at the wall united as they remember those that we've lost.

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  • Hidden Rituals - Forrest Brandt -- Kaylan, Mon, May 30 2005, 10:49:20 (65.175.204.68)
    Forrest Brandt,
    I have just read your poem, "Hidden Rituals". That must have been tough to see and to remember. I am curious though, what is a brigade morgue? Was the body that of a U.S. soilder or a Vietnamese? I'm sure as you said, the scenes would be difficult for the boys to forget, but what about you? I couldn't imagine ever forgetting something like that, how do you cope with the horiffic images?

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  • Corpsman Up, I Called - Billy Wisenant -- Kaylan, Mon, May 30 2005, 10:24:33 (65.175.204.68)
    Dear Billy R. Whisenant,
    I read your poem, "Corpsman Up, I Called!". From your poem it seems these corpsmen are very brave. They risked their lives for others. I beleive that all the men that fought are equally brave. All of you risked your lives for another's. God bless all of you who served for our country. Although you were not a corpsman, you also saved many lives. Thank you for all that you have done. If you would respond I would appreciate it. Thank you again.

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  • Where Do I Begin ... -- Malorey, Mon, May 30 2005, 10:20:23 (24.34.69.137)
    Linda,
    Your story was amazing because it showed hope and how you should always have faith. It showed me how even the smallest things, for example a letter from a stranger,could change someones life, and give them the strength to fight on; even if it's for something more than winning a war, but for surviving it by any means neccessary. In other words, your story was different. As a result of you doing a favor for your brother, you helped a nation.

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  • Sail Away, Home-- Denis Cook -- Malorey, Mon, May 30 2005, 9:51:12 (24.34.69.137)
    Wow, I never realized how tramatic it could be to lose fellow members of a crew (yours in this particular case). You must have been close to them to feel so deep of a loss. I don't know how I would cope if I saw the people that I've been working with die in front of my eyes. How is that you cope?

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  • Sail Away, Home- Don Poss -- Malorey, Mon, May 30 2005, 9:50:06 (24.34.69.137)
    Wow, I never realized how tramatic it could be to lose fellow members of a crew (yours in this particular case). You must have been close to them to feel so deep of a loss. I don't know how I would cope if I saw the people that I've been working with die in front of my eyes. How is that you cope?

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  • United States Flag emblem -- Ron Henze, Sun, May 29 2005, 4:35:56 (63.18.181.218)
    Please place a flag emblem by the name of Randall Allen Henze who died in Vietnam on February 22, 1968. His name is on the Vietnam War Memorial at 40E 063. He was my twin brother.

    Thank you.

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  • Your war story -- Deborah, Fri, May 20 2005, 10:58:30 (199.230.36.32)
    Dear Jack Stoddard, I am a student at Aragon High School and my teacher is having us write some reflections to war stories. Right from the start when I was reading your story, it made me sad. It must have been hard enough to see your good friend die but then you had to go and tell a complete stranger that her older brother had died. You say that this girl was young and I wonder how long because I know from experience that having someone close to you die when you are young is hard. Children are curious and I think it must have been pretty hard to you to tell her and for her to deal.

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  • Closing the door for frank -- Jerron Tabisola, Fri, May 20 2005, 11:02:43 (199.230.36.135)
    I just read your story, Closing the Door for Frank. I feel very sorry for you in that you had to deal with losing one of your friends from war. It must have been a terrible experience, and I know that it is very tough to do what you did, in calling his family. I think it takes a lot of bravery to go to war, but I also think it takes a lot to inform the family. I know that you probably have dealt with a lot, and maybe you feel guilty. I think that you did all that you could when you were there in the field. I think that there is no reason for you to feel guilty for his death. The one thing about your experience and story that interests me is how you handled your self when it happened. Also the amount of respect that you had for your fallen friend Frank. It seems as though you are one of those friends that no one forgets.

    Sincerely,
    Jerron Tabisola

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  • Well Hello -- student, Thu, May 26 2005, 13:51:26 (66.30.103.87)
    hello i'm a student at Pembroke Academy and we're doing a project on Vietnam. We have to go to different Vietnam Veteran websites and try and get Veterans to respond to us and talk with us on there descression. We are reading "The Things They Carried" by Tom O'brien I happened to read Dog Soldiers by Paul Cameron and hope you would reply because it would mean a lot to me and i would like to hear your perspective(s) on it. Hope to hear from you soon..

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  • The last supper -- steak and eggs, Thu, May 26 2005, 17:11:21 (205.188.116.202)
    so sence they thought that you wouldnt be comming home they thought that they would be nice and give you a kind of bribal breakfast of real steak and eggs. then you prooved them wrong good for you!

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  • No Dead Heroes -- Alexa Godfrey, Fri, May 20 2005, 11:10:20 (199.230.36.218)
    Dear Bob Uchman,

    I’m writing in repose to your war story No Dead Heroes. I felt that your story was so interesting and spectacular. I particularly liked the format in which it was written, I felt like you were taking me on a detailed journey through the day where I was actually with you. Your detail was profound and helped me to capture every sound, feeling, and thought that pulsed through your body. It was the title that first captured my eye and I was not disappointed when I made the choice to read about and eventually enter the world in which you lived. In your last paragraph you stated "I believe we are backwards in not having provisions for a decoration for emotional wounds and scars, that have a parallel to physical wounds" and I have to agree with your statement. I would imagine that the emotional wounds of war are much deeper than the physical cuts and scratches. Thank you for taking time to share your story with those who seek knowledge about the particular events you faced.

    Sincerely,

    Alexa Godfrey

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  • An Act of Desperation? -- Larry Lusk, Mon, May 23 2005, 13:07:54 (66.214.115.70)
    During the Vietnam War one tactic that was used to combat the Viet Cong was to round up all males within a certain age range in a district where a lot of insurgent activity was occurring. While most of these operations were conducted by ARVN troops they were almost always supported by American troops. The idea was that at least a portion of the VC were pretending to be or were actually part of the population of that area and worked in the fields and shops during the day. At night they joined their VC units to conduct military operations. No one really knows how many of those that were gathered up during these sweeps were actually Viet Cong but forced confessions and executions were reported but never officially acknowledged. This tactic did reduce the number of VC attacks in many areas, at least for a short while, but the anger they generated is well documented. In addition some of those “detained as suspected Viet Cong” were forced to join the ARVN to prove they were not VC and what happened to the rest is somewhat murky. The general feeling in the field was that while these “sweeps” were effective in the short run they only fostered increased anger and hatred against the South Vietnamese Government and American troops in the long run. I think that the various written histories of this war tend to bare this out.

    One of the expressed purposed of this site; through our stories and the insights gained through our experience in Viet Nam, is to provide information so the younger people of today can draw some benefit from what “we” learned. I have been scolded in the past when I have suggested parallels between the war in Iraq and Vietnam and I probably will on this one too. “Operation Squeeze Play” that is now in progress in Iraq sounds, at least on the surface, very much like the “round-up” sweeps done in Vietnam. If the comparison is strong then while there may be a reduction in attacks in that area in the short run it only makes more determined enemies in the long term. It’s as much an act of desperation now as it was in Vietnam. How much pain are we willing to inflict on a people to prove that the act of war we committed was the right thing to do? How many more of our troops will die in the future because we are repeating a tactic that in Vietnam only prolonged that conflict? It is already clear that retaliation for this new operation is resulting in increased attacks in other parts of Iraq. I doubt that any of our current Generals and military thinkers read this board. Perhaps they should.

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  • die hard -- Belen Alvarez, Fri, May 20 2005, 11:13:30 (199.230.37.19)
    Die hard:
    After all these years you still have it in you! That’s really brave of you to defend yourself from a man who had a deadly weapon. He thought he got you since looks are deceiving. I found interesting how that man came to you and demanded your wallet. The bastard! He must’ve have thought that you were all shoken up from the 9/11 incident. He used that incident as a weapon to get to you! Good job for taking control but I thought highly risky. I think in a situation like that I would give him my wallet and run (on a count on that I never have money (or credit cards) for I’m a jobless teenager) to all gangbangers out there don’t mess with Vietnam vets.

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  • Dog Soldiers -- belinda, Fri, May 20 2005, 12:17:44 (199.230.36.53)
    Dear Paul Cameron,
    I read your poem "Dog Soldiers" and it actually surprised me. I had no idea that dogs were trained to fight in the war. That really came as a shock to me. I guess I should have expected something like that though. A lot of things were done differently during the Vietnam War. What really got to me was the line you wrote saying that between dogs and soldiers, there was no difference. I know that is how most of the soldiers began to feel, but that is so sad. I am sorry for the things all of the soldiers had to go through and do. None of it was necessary or fair. I am now also sorry for the domestic pets that were forced to be trained for this war, or any war for that matter.

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  • kaboom -- Daniel, Fri, May 20 2005, 11:14:42 (199.230.48.239)
    I am a student at Aragon High School, and I am replying to the story by Dan Cook about the story Kaboom. In your story you describe seeing a huge amount of fire power, and I was wondering if you could go into more detail about how much fire power there actually was. Also, I wanted to know what kind of firepower was used. I also wanted to know what an AVC is. You mentioned that they never had a chance, and that they were all gone, but I not clear on what exactly that was. I would also like to know if you suffered any other injuries, besides the concussion. I would like to let you know that you are very brave. I would like to know if you would recommend joining the military. This story affected me, in that now I feel I have a better understanding of how crazy war is. Please write back.

    Sincerely,
    Daniel Lagomarsino

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  • GET A DUPLICATE PURPLE HEART MEDAL -- CLARENCE THEIS, Fri, May 13 2005, 21:32:09 (65.74.112.122)
    i would like to get a duplicate of my brothers purple heart he recieved in Vietnam

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  • De Hard -- rachel, Fri, May 20 2005, 11:10:15 (199.230.36.93)
    Dear Author of Die Hard,
    I just read our story and I felt this story was very real to me because it happened not long ago. I was alive and old enough to know what happen during 9/11. I felt the courage and heart when you stood up to the man with the gun. I felt like you had adrenaline running through your body and you were not going to let anyone control you or scare you. It was unbelievable what took place after 9/11 and how everyone came together and noticed that we are all one country no matter how many differences we all have. We live in the same place and that makes us one in some way. Living through the Vietnam war would make me realize how special and true our country is. You were not scared you went in for the hit and got him and I think you surprised him greatly. After you started to run after him and remembered he had a gun and you stopped. The one thing that surprised me was he didn’t come back to get you. He was the scared one and he had the fire power. I give you a lot of credit for being so brave.

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  • It Taste Like soap -- Veronica Hall, Fri, May 20 2005, 12:19:47 (199.230.36.156)
    Dear Jay Gearheart,
    I really like your war story, "It Taste Like Soap!" A lot of the war stories people tell or hear are sad or gory. Those stories make it seem like nothing good comes from war. They make me feel as though war is only filled with death, loss, and pain. Those stories leave me sad and feeling sorry for people who had to go through war. This war story is comical. It shows that destruction and loss isn’t all that war is about. War also gives people good memories. People create lasting memories during war. Some good, and some bad.

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  • Smack -- Nick Navarro, Fri, May 20 2005, 12:26:12 (199.230.36.147)
    Dear Jerry, Haha I thought your story was very entertaining. Its funny how the dog got its name. This story not only invoked fear and anticipation but was very comical as well. The way you described how the rabies was going to affect you made me literally "lol". I’m not surprised this story made it in a newspaper.

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  • ty -- Mitch, Fri, May 20 2005, 12:24:40 (199.230.36.63)
    Dear Don Pass,

    I enjoyed your story about the importance of memory and prayer. Your story has truly touched me because it gives inspiration, encourages trust and encourages the power of love and friendship. It shows that singing, and prayer can soothe the soul, and give guidance. If only everyone could read your poem, then the world might better understand the Vietnam War. War causes so much destruction, and can only be combated with the urgency and healing of prayer, and singing. I sternly believe that with these tools of peace, they can fight off the traumatizing memories of war, the painful injuries, and the emotional damage of war? If good truly always defeats evil, the I trust that peace and symbols of peace will defeat war and its reign of terror of the soldiers who fought during the Vietnam War and the war today in Iraq, and the Middle East.

    Dear David Roberts,

    That was an interesting story, and was quite entertaining, (in a funny kind of way). It was very well written, especially for a short story. I never would have predicted the ending to your story. It also got me thinking of the importance of humor, even during times of chaos, fear, and war itself. It’s pleasing to hear that although some of your comrades died because of an admittedly "stupid" mistake, you still manage to make the most of things. With this story, you have taken this very scary, and traumatizing, (I can only guess), experience of being in Vietnam, and turned it into a completely, innocent, (or rather almost innocent), experience that you will actually enjoy remembering. I am proud of your service to Vietnam, among other things, but I believe it is best to leave you at that and end with a quote. "Men fall, men die, but a man’s life, even after death, can change a world if used correctly, not wasted."

    Dear Robert Anon,

    I was laughing quite hard when I read your story about the water fight that you had in Vietnam. Using condoms as water balloons can only be described as interesting to read, at the least. Also, I still think calling a female officer "Thunder Thighs" seems kind of harsh, but still, at the same time very funny. I’m glad you can make the best of situations, specifically the war in Vietnam, and have fun even in times of war and combat. I’m sure you had many other great stories and adventures back in Vietnam. I wouldn’t mind hearing more of your war-stories, as you seem like a light-hearted person. Keep them coming, and I truly wish you the best.

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  • Fatso -- Nick Navarro, Fri, May 20 2005, 12:24:17 (199.230.36.147)
    Dear Lee, Wow this is a funny story. it reminds me of that big guy in full metal jacket who is always behind. It was sort of mean you guys did that though but it got his feet moving so I guess its all gravy.

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  • Picure Gallery -- Seth Van Nuys, Fri, May 20 2005, 12:24:03 (199.230.37.198)
    Dear Don Poss,

    You series of pictures are really amazing. I have a big interest in all military aircraft, and this made my interest even greater. I like your segment on this web page because it didn’t have long poems, or stories about what happened in the war. It had pictures and comments underneath the pictures, and made it a lot more interesting to watch. The pictures I enjoyed most was the picture of the afterburners. The other picture I liked was where it said, "look for the guy with the funny flashlights." That one made me laugh, because it was funny. Thank you for your time, and have a good day.

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  • wow -- amber, Fri, May 20 2005, 12:23:52 (199.230.36.109)
    When I read your story I was scared and shocked at the same time, the pictures each tell a story, a story of beauty, tragedy, and emotions. To see the pictures was a meaning full experience it as almost like you were there. I read a few more of you stories and I think that you were ment to share theses with everyone. I thank you and congratulate and you bravery and your honesty to be able to inform all the people about the real happening’s that happened in the war.

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  • poem -- Seth Van Nuys, Fri, May 20 2005, 12:22:27 (199.230.37.198)
    Dear Patricia,

    Your poem about Johnny’s life was very touching. I liked how you kept the same rhythm throughout the whole poem. It made a lot more sense to be because of the style you used. I could actually see the events happening when they were written down. Many of the other stories I read, this one stood out the most. I really enjoyed this poem because many of the other ones I read were boring, and not fun to read. You are one talented writer, and I enjoy your works. Thank you for your time, and have a good day.

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  • coffee -- Amber, Fri, May 20 2005, 12:22:13 (199.230.36.109)
    What interested me in to reading you story was the word coffee; I work at a coffee shop! I though that your story was very interesting to me. My uncle was in the war and I just find it very appealing to here all these stories. My uncle never talked much when he I knew him but, my mom always told me that he was one of the only men to come back from his company and so now he has the "war syndrome" I think that’s what she said. He never talked to anyone about anything. I think that it really great that you took the time to share your stories with everyone. I really appreciate what you are doing educating every one about the "good" times.

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  • Dear, John Alexander Hottell, III -- makoto kadota, Fri, May 20 2005, 12:20:42 (199.230.36.177)
    Your story made me feels like army life isn’t that bad. It brought you to places where you usually wouldn’t be able to go and see. You must have dignity and pride to fight for something you believe in. I understood you like sports very much. Sports have also brought me joy even in hard times. You have achieved so many things and yet joined the army. While reading this story, it made me wonder why you choose to go to the army. You probably had other choices to do for your life. I also thought soldiers would be scared to die and scared of the enemy and question what you are fighting for.
    . But you were not afraid of death and could accept it.

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  • Vietnam Questions to authors -- M-bates, Fri, May 20 2005, 12:20:28 (199.230.36.72)
    Dear Patrick.
    ,
    Hi. I am a student at Aragon High School. I have read your story about the "Wall". It is a very enticing story. I have a few questions for you before I go. First, what were your feelings when you first saw the wall? How were you able to gather the strength to go back and visit the wall? Was it hard? As for the visitors you see at the wall each time you visit, I would feel the same as you. I would probably feel their pain. As you already know, I have not ever been apart of a war. I wish you could tell me more about the feelings that you had gone through, before and after the wars that you have lived through. Thank you for your time and story. I hope to read another of them soon.

    Aragon Student



    Dear Linda.

    Hi I am a student at Aragon High school. I have read your story about your experiences in the war. What was it like being in the army as a female? Would you ever want to relive that experience again? How did you cope with being without your loved ones? Was there anyone special that you were attached to during the war? Have you ever visited the "Wall"? Do you feel that you are a part of the Vietnam Memorial? With the letters that you had sent during the war, what were your feelings, knowing that you would not be able to see someone in person? Thank you for your story of you war experiences.

    Aragon Student

    Dear Don.

    I am a student at Aragon High School. I have read the letter to Don. I was very intrigued by the words spoken between loved ones during time of war. How did you feel when you received the letter? What was your response to the letter about? Were you relieved to hear from some friends and family? How was the whole Vietnam war experience? As you probably know, I have not experienced the war surroundings. What was it like at the end of the War? I thank you for your story and time.

    Aragon student

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  • My enemy -- Maggie Gaan, Fri, May 20 2005, 12:19:02 (199.230.36.96)
    Dear Pat Comunes,
    I have just read your story titled "My Enemy," and I think that it is a very sincere story. I haven’t read one quite like yours yet out of the many that I have read. It is interesting to see how you can compare yourself to the American soldiers and feel the same way. I am glad I got a chance to read your story because it opened my eyes to see a perspective from some one on the other side. I got to see how similar both sides of the war were. From what I have read, it seems that soldiers from both sides had the same thoughts about the war and that both sides didn’t know exactly what they were getting themselves into. At least you have forgiven your enemies and hopefully we will be able to live in a world of peace soon. I think that you have been forgiven of your enemies because now everyone has realized that the war in Vietnam was basically for no reason. Thank you for sharing your story. –Maggie Gaan

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  • Christmas Star -- David, Fri, May 20 2005, 12:18:11 (199.230.36.127)
    Don Poss,

    I enjoyed your "Christmas Star" article about Christmas at Da Nang. It is only appropriate that there should be at least one day of calm in a battle zone, just to let soldiers clear their minds and think of non-war-related things. It is also appropriate, some would say, to have this day come on the most religious day in the year: Christmas. I can only imagine "Silent Night" in the middle of a war area. The quieter, more meaningful side of war is always the most beautiful. Time out from killing, from blood, from mortars and M-16’s and Hueys, if only for a moment – it should be savored and remembered.

    Hoping you are well.

    -David

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  • phone call -- Alexandra, Fri, May 20 2005, 12:16:46 (199.230.36.218)
    The Phone Call!
    Dear Mr. Phone Call, that was probably one of the most funny but sad stories I have ever wrote! I can’t believe that happened to some guy that was on his way home. I mean I would be so mad if that ever happened to me and I wasn’t even fighting in Vietnam! I am glad you were not any of the other civilians where you can actually walk and you were not in that much pain. At least you had some fun while you were in the hospital you had a few laughs and some pain( after falling off the bed from laughing so hard). I appreciate the funny story its one of the few that made me laugh!

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  • Story reflection -- Taylor, Fri, May 20 2005, 12:16:43 (199.230.37.44)
    Dear Paul Cameron,

    I just read your poem and it was very touching. It was extremely

    beautiful. I know of people who fought in Vietnam and it is very hard for

    them to share their experiences. You are a very brave and honorable

    person do share this beautiful poem with everyone. Thank you for fighting

    in the war!

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  • Heavy Heart -- belinda, Fri, May 20 2005, 12:16:34 (199.230.36.53)
    Dear Larry Poss,
    Your story "Heavy Heart" has touched me. I am deeply sorry about your two cousins Gary and Travis. I myself had two cousins fight in the Vietnam War, but fortunately they both came home. But I do know what it is like to lose someone dear to you. I am truly sorry that you had to experience the horrors of war, death, and destruction at such an early age. I am also sorry that Gary and Travis were lost while they were still young, while they still had their whole lives ahead of them. I hope that you have come to terms with what happened in the Vietnam War, and you can continue to live happily. I wish you happiness in life and I express my deepest sorrows for all the wrongs done to you and your family over the past forty years due to the war. Please accept my condolences. Thank you.

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  • Dear, Tay Ninh Province -- Makoto Kadota, Fri, May 20 2005, 12:16:14 (199.230.36.177)
    I understood this story very much because I recently did an interview to a person whom was in Japanese army in World War 2. He was afraid to be killed by the Americans and wished he wasn’t in war. His friends and family was suffering from bombs. They burned down houses, farmland, schools, factory, everything. He believed Americans were same as the Japanese. He said they just wanted to have peace and power just to protect the country. He couldn’t understand who really was the enemy. He said, "There is no bad guy and good guy in war. War it’s self is bad." I wish there will be a time where everyone can live in peace.

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  • Story reflection -- Taylor, Fri, May 20 2005, 12:15:33 (199.230.37.44)
    Dear Larry Poss,

    I just read your story and it was very touching. It was extremely

    emotional for me to read about the tough time you went through. Your

    experience in visiting the wall was emotional for me to read. I know of

    people who fought in the Vietnam War and they have told me about their

    life changing experiences. I one day also hope to visit the Memorial. Thank

    you for sharing your hard times. You are a very honorable person.

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  • The Wall of Innocence -- belinda, Fri, May 20 2005, 12:15:30 (199.230.36.53)
    Dear George A. Wendell,
    The Wall of Innocence is a beautiful poem. I can see why you would post it, and why it makes you feel the way you say it does. It is very sad to think of all the people who went ahead and were left behind. I had three cousins fight in Vietnam. Fortunately, they all came back home. But I cannot imagine what it would have been like if they had been killed. I really do appreciate this poem. It makes me think about "What If?" I also think about all those who did go ahead and how hard it must have been for all those people. This poem really does mean a lot to me.

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  • Worm -- Alexandra, Fri, May 20 2005, 12:15:25 (199.230.36.218)
    The Worm!
    Dear The Worm,your story was hilarious I cant believe some idiotic person would do that to a person! I mean don’t they see a worm inside someone else body it’s a worm!! Well at least you had something to laugh about while you were in the hospital during war. I just cant believe someone would surgically sew a worm and not realize it. I guess this doctor was new or something because I think a doctor should know the difference between a worm and a vein it’s a big difference I think. Well thank you for sharing that wonderful experience on this website it made me laugh a lot unlike the other stories they were kind of boring, since all they talk about is there friends dying and stuff. I mean I do feel bad for them since you and the rest of those poor innocent people went into war and fought for our country. But while you were in war I think every person had a few laughs ( like you)

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  • Soap -- Alexandra, Fri, May 20 2005, 12:12:57 (199.230.36.218)
    Tastes Like Soap!
    Dear Taste Like Soap guy, I really enjoyed your story. I picked your story because the title was really funny! Your story was really funny, it almost sounds like you were having fun in war! But that sucks that all those people drank soapy water because of you, I would hate the people who would do that to my water. But I must say if I smelled and that was the only to take a shower I would do the same thing to keep clean ( I give you props for doing that!!) . Well, thanks for writing this story it really made me laugh I’m glad you didn’t write a story about people dying even though you were in war and everything, but its something new to read about.

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  • The Worm By: William Dean -- Courtney, Fri, May 20 2005, 12:06:59 (199.230.36.173)
    Your story was really funny! That’s kind of gross that there was a worm in him though. That’s crazy how a doctor thought a worm was part of the boy. I know he didn’t realize it but jeez! haha. Did that happen to anyone else after that? Were you at all grossed out? I would have been. Well you probably wern’t grossed out because you were around worms all the time i’m guessing. Thank you for sharing your story. I really enjoyed it.

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  • Red Sky -- Krysta, Fri, May 20 2005, 12:04:41 (199.230.36.230)
    Reflection-The Red Sky

    Dear Micheal Gillen,
    I just read your war story called the Red Sky. It seemed like during your experience, you felt calm and mellow, yet at the same time you felt nervous. I can see that you loved to sail the sea and that you were very committed to your job. The job you were assigned seemed very dangerous and you had the devotion and the confidence to accomplish it. I admire your courage because it takes a lot to do something important to your country. Also, in accomplishing this job, it felt like you knew you had to take responsibility and to watch over the sea for any enemies. That seems like a hard task as well, because not only did you have to protect yourself, you had to protect others around you. When you described how you saw red glares in the sky, it felt like I was there too, and I could feel that you had a rush of feeling when you saw the bright flares ahead. I bet your fear started kick in and made you finally see the reality of war.

    Sincerely, KRYSTA

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  • The Phone Call by William Dean -- Courtney, Fri, May 20 2005, 12:04:36 (199.230.36.173)
    Wow! that was such a funny story! I was expecting this story to be really sad and depressing. It pretty much started off sad but once you said what the phone call was about I couldn’t stop laughing. I feel really embarresed for that guy. Do you know if his legs have gotten better? Well at least you could move around. Were you ever that embaressed while you were there? I really liked that story. I hope there are some more funny stories out there. It’s better than the sad stories because no one likes to be sad.

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  • Tastes Like Soap! -- Courtney, Fri, May 20 2005, 12:01:53 (199.230.36.173)
    I chose your story because it sounded funny and yet interesting. I really liked reading it because it was so funny that you got caught. It doesn’t sound like it would be a war story. But it was good! That is gross that fellow soldiers had cool aid with it too. I bet you were laughing pretty hard. Did you get in any trouble for it? Glad there was an upside to your trip. I’m pretty sure I won’t forget this story as I am sure you won’t either. Thank you for sharing it.

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  • To Shoot A Dog -- David, Fri, May 20 2005, 11:57:42 (199.230.36.127)
    Mr. G. Ernest Govea,


    I was moved by your story, "To Shoot A Dog." It wasn’t a typical war story, filled with mortars and medics and such. It didn’t show the blatant killing of the enemy and injuries and Hueys. It showed the tender, tragic side of killing. When people now talk of Vietnam, I doubt that they think of the dogs. Your story makes people forget about the rest of the Vietnam history, of the protests and the Vietcong, and focuses on the personal agony of the soldiers. I doubt I could shoot an innocent dog, even if it was a danger to me and my friends. You were right. In a war filled with killing and blood, it certainly shouldn’t require the deaths of pleasant poochs.

    Hoping you are doing well,

    -David

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  • Reflection Khan -- Khan Chang, Fri, May 20 2005, 11:14:43 (199.230.36.53)
    My teacher requires me that I reflect upon 3 of these stories and I choose Water. The Water story reveals the moment in Vietnam where soldiers just try to learn and blend in with the foreign culture. The Thai Water Festival was like a big event during that time because everyone had fun and gets away from the stress of the war. The story also shows how many different departments of army were involved and the different things they contribute to make the water festival as successful and enjoyable. This pieces give a sense of good mood which is rare to found in war but this story was really able to present the event in a best word possible. Thank you, Rober Arnau for this wonderful peiece.

    My teacher requires me that I reflect upon 3 of these stories and I choose Da Nang Air Base. The story tell about one of 52,000 who was killed in Vietnam, this particular piece is about Sgt. Jensen. This story gives me the sense of dangerous that was happening in Vietnam. This story tells about how Sgt. Jensen die in a foreign land, I think it is a good way to remember someone who had serve his country. Sgt. Jensen was killed due to jammed vehicle if it wasn’t jammed then Sgt. Jensen may still be with us today. There is no one to blame, it was an accident and Sgt. Jensen did his duty and die during his service. Thank You, Tom Winn for writing this memorable piece.

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  • 13th strike -- Jerron Tabisola, Fri, May 20 2005, 11:14:11 (199.230.36.135)
    Dear Mark Witt,
    I just read your story the 13th strike. I found your story very interesting because it showed how soldiers get their names placed on the wall, but they re never recovered or seen again. I though it was very weird how the planes had crashed, but had never been recovered, and on the 13th of the month. I think that it is very heart breaking to a family when their family member dies and they cant have a time to see them again. I also think that it is good that you are remembering them and saying what they did good. It must be good for their family to hear.
    Sincerely,
    Jerron Tabisola

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  • Power of A name -- Dj MIKE, Fri, May 20 2005, 11:13:57 (199.230.36.131)
    Hi I am writing this to Valerie regarding her story Power of a name. i was really touched with your field trip to the Veitnam wall in washington. i didnt know that the wall still as alive as it was before. i really sorry that your dad died one week before you were born. just know that he died for this great country.it was really cool that people have bigger parts on the wall. even tho everyone has to be praised. and thank you for sharing this expirence.

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  • Red Cross Girls -- Vince, Fri, May 20 2005, 11:13:10 (199.230.36.237)
    David Roberts- i had just read your story Red Cross Girls. It was one of the most entertaining stories i had ever read. It's crazy that someone would give you a noisy ol' boat in wartimes and send you down the river. It seems like a suicide mission unless you were lucky and you really are to live. Also i feel that guys pain that had to hurt a lot having his dick circumscised and being near such a pretty lady. Great stroy hope you can tell more about what happened next im really interested.

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  • Thoughts and Feelings -- Rachel, Fri, May 20 2005, 11:12:45 (199.230.36.93)
    Dear Don Ray,

    Were reading this site on war stories and I came across yours. I stopped and read a few sentences and I realized it was about a dog. I have two dogs of my own and I felt that I wanted to read this because of that one reason. I’m very found of animals and this touched me in a special way. I loved how you cared so much about this dog Samson even though he was not yours. That took a lot of courage to go so far for just a dog. Even though everyone was laughing at you and making fun of you, you still went through with helping the dog. That nurse was a huge help and she was another great person in this story. This story Feelings and Thoughts is a true feeling. It is love for animals and also humans. You thought about how the dog’s owner would feel coming back to his companion but his companion not being alive. It was a very thoughtful and caring action.

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  • Dear Patrick -- Steph, Fri, May 20 2005, 11:12:22 (199.230.36.164)
    I was little confused when I finished reading Cool Breeze but after analyzing a little bit more I realized how Roland Houser did everything in his power to complete his obligations. His tent needed an air conditioner and so he carried onto the air base, but when he returned the A/C was gone. After encountering a new one he saw the Zoomies had it all along. But Houser didn’t get mad or even ask them to return it. I thought he was selfless after said all is fair in love and war. Especially a war that someone was forced to get into.

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  • Christmas 1960 -- Rachel, Fri, May 20 2005, 11:11:17 (199.230.36.93)
    Dear John Murphy,

    I just read your story Christmas of 1960. I think this was a true war story in the situation that you fought your fight and you wanted to go home. I’m a very family oriented person so I connected well with you when you said you wanted to go home. I cant imagine being out in the wild fighting for your life. Everyday not knowing what is to come next or wen the next attack will be. When you were talking about your mom being so happy that you were home it made me smile. If I was away in a foreign place fighting a deadly was I know I would think about home everyday. I was very happy and relieved you got to go home after all. You showed such enthusiasm in talking about your flight home. Talking about all 7 countries you saw it even got me excited. I felt your energy when talking about your way home and that’s what pulled me into your story.

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  • Dear Don -- stephanie olano, Fri, May 20 2005, 11:10:31 (199.230.36.164)
    After I read Deadbeat I saw how GIs could become so cold and heartless. In this story this man was just walking down the street when a woman handed him a dead baby and panhandled him for money. However, when he looked back at the woman she was handing the baby to another woman and just walked away. This man was a victim of fraud and stupidity. He couldn’t see this woman or her dead baby for what they really were, a crime or as the enemy. Distinguishing between the two is difficult but when your in a war that person not only has to be aware that the enemy is all around him but also has many faces.

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  • Christmas Letter -- Caroline, Fri, May 20 2005, 11:09:40 (199.230.36.63)
    I enjoyed this letter because even though almost everything about war is depressing, Ted did a good job with explaining to his friends and family that he wasn’t going to dwell on the negative part of the war. So, in a way it was almost insightful because it was just a typical Christmas card and it made it seem like he was optimistic about where and what he was doing in Nam. Overall, I really enjoyed this letter because if I the family this is the type of card I would want to receive from a loved one at war.

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  • As far as I can see -- Al, Fri, May 20 2005, 11:06:44 (199.230.36.85)
    Dear Bill Kernoczy and Terry Nolan,
    I read your poem, and it was unbelievable thinking about that list of people on the memorial wall. There are so many people that were killed or were MIA. I think it's nice that you put your poems on here

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  • Your war story -- Deborah, Fri, May 20 2005, 11:05:37 (199.230.36.32)
    Dear Don Poss, I am a student at Aragon High School and my teacher is having us read some war stories and I enjoyed your story. Even though your story ended in a painful way, it was nice to hear that during war it is not all fighting, you have some fun too. The man that hit the fan seemed odd. I was wondering if he had some trauma from seeing so much gore or if he was just weird. Maybe he wanted to hurt himself so he could get away from the war. I have read about that before.

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  • reflection -- rich, Fri, May 20 2005, 11:03:32 (199.230.36.147)
    Hi I’m doing a reflection in my English class on your poem and I really like how you incorporate how you see a candle chasing away the dark of night. And how you say that it is passed on to protect others from the dark of night. And I also like how you refer to all the people on the wall and how there are so many of them that you just pass them bye as you walk down the never ending stone. And how their monument is so big and tall that it stretches to the top of the sky. And how you say that there are a whole bunch of other people feeling the walls of lost memories and that are feeling the walls too and now you know that you are not alone. This to me is very meaning full that not only you have to go and see the wall of lost soldiers but there are so many more that have to come and do the same thing.

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  • Christmas 1999 -- Brandi, Fri, May 20 2005, 11:00:56 (199.230.36.127)
    Ted- I read your christmas letter titled "Christmas 1999" For our English class we were sent to read a few war stories and reflect on the, Your story was more a letter than anything... and even though it did not exactly exemplify your neccessary experiences... It did show that you still thought of your loved ones during your time spent in Vietnam. You kind of explained how you did not wantto write a letter home explaining bad moments of where you were at... You wanted to just explain you were well... and wished nothing but the best to your friends and family. Since it was christmas, you thought it would be especially nice to keep your christmas card G-Rated. I agree with these actions, because if I had been you I would have done the same. Your loved ones don't ever want to know how bad you are doing. They only want to hear what's good with you.

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  • Reflection -- Stephanie, Fri, May 20 2005, 11:00:00 (199.230.36.173)
    5/20/05

    This reflection is for the whole world to see and read. The author of Wall of Innocence is unknown, but their poem is amazing. The poem is a memory that is embedded into their history. The poem talks about how the wall, with all of the names of those who perished in the Vietnam War, on it, says that their names should be in red; to signify the pure blood of courage that these men fought with. The wall is described as dark and lifeless, yet the meaning of the names is what adds the life to it. When one goes to the wall, they can remember the loved one they lost as a result to the war. Also this poem to me made me think that war is something that people fight in and to what extent we think "freedom" really is, but to what cost are we fighting at? This poem makes me think of all my loved ones who in the past have perished. It’s such a peaceful poem, but at the same time a poem of remembrance. This little girl, by whom the author seems to be very interested in, is the innocence that this author once saw in the wall. The little girl is at the wall with memories or her father who died, but through this wall she is able to see him and talk to him as if the wall was a barrier that separates heaven and reality.

    Sincerely,
    Stephanie Barnett

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  • no dead heroes -- Daniel, Fri, May 20 2005, 10:58:46 (199.230.48.239)
    I am a student at Aragon High School, and I read your story about no dead heroes. I found your story very interesting, because I thought it was good how you explained the fear that was involved in going to war. This story affected me a lot because I am planning on enlisting in the Air Force. I just wanted to know how the army affected you, and if you have any advice for me. I am starting to have second thoughts about going to the Academy, because I now see how war is very dangerous. I was just wondering if you would recommend I go to war, or if you think that it would not be a wise decision. I appreciate your candidness with the story, and I like how you did not sugar coat anything, but rather gave raw details. If you could please write me back, I would really appreciate it.

    Sincerely,
    Daniel Lagomarsino

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  • Power Of a Name -- Rachel, Fri, May 20 2005, 10:57:52 (199.230.36.132)
    Dear Valerie,
    I just read your story "Power of a Name" it is really very touching. I personally don’t know anyone that was in the war but to hear your perspective of having your father die 1 week before you were born, I just felt lucky. It was so wonderful though that people can go look at that wall and continue to praise the soldiers that died for us. I also think that it is really cool that people still go and leave flowers for the names on the wall. You would think that it was just a wall, but for many others it is way more than that. I just wanted to thank you for sharing that experience with people, it was touching.

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  • reflection -- mitch, Fri, May 20 2005, 10:55:00 (199.230.36.147)
    Hi I’m doing a reflection in my English class on your poem and I really like how you incorporate how you see a candle chasing away the dark of night. And how you say that it is passed on to protect others from the dark of night. And I also like how you refer to all the people on the wall and how there are so many of them that you just pass them bye as you walk down the never ending stone. And how their monument is so big and tall that it stretches to the top of the sky. And how you say that there are a whole bunch of other people feeling the walls of lost memories and that are feeling the walls too and now you know that you are not alone. This to me is very meaning full that not only you have to go and see the wall of lost soldiers but there are so many more that have to come and do the same thing.

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  • Red Cross Girls -- Brandi, Fri, May 20 2005, 10:52:13 (199.230.36.127)
    David Roberts- I read your story REd Cross Girls- my friend and I found it pretty interesting! Is that true?? Wow- That musthave been pretty bad for your friend to have to have a circumsion in his adult years... and all because of a prostitute. Anywho... I would have liked to know a little bit more about the Red Cross Girls... what or why were there? I thought it was funny when you said that you guys were ambushed because of the aluminum boat.. How come you didn't go on the river in a less noisy boat? Was that all that was available? Very interesting story- too bad for your friend!

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  • Your war story -- Deborah, Fri, May 20 2005, 10:48:43 (199.230.36.32)
    Dear Bob Uckman, I am a student at Aragon High School and we are doing a unit about the Vietnam War. My teacher is making us write to some authors about what we thought about their story. When we learn about war, it never seems real because we are not really involved but reading your story is a strange experience. Reading your story made me see that war is real and normal people have experienced this. When you talk about the guns and the fights it is scary. I am not even there and I could imagine the fear. I think that it is a good thing for us to hear stories like this because with the Iraq war, this could become somewhat real to some of us in the future.

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  • Kaboom -- Rachel, Fri, May 20 2005, 10:46:25 (199.230.36.132)
    Dear Den Cook,
    I just read your story "Kaboom.." and I think that it is terrible that you had to go through being scared all the time. I would have hated feeling like that all the time. I really appericate you going through that struggle for our country though. If it weren’t for you, our country might not be where we are today. It really sucks that you thought you were safe but in the end you really never are, I guess you have to find that out the hard way. I am very affected by your story because it sounds like a scary time in your life, and I think it sounds like u handled it pretty well, I could never have gone through that.

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  • Thoughts and Feelings -- Brandi, Fri, May 20 2005, 10:44:53 (199.230.36.127)
    Dear Don Ray- I read your story"Thoughts and Feelings" For an English assignment we were sent to the computer lab to read a few war stories, and write reflections back to those who were of interest. Your story in particular: Feelings and Thoughts caught my eye for a few reasons. In general, I thought your story was very descriptive with graphic detail… I could actually imagine I was there. Your introduction, describing your observations while interviewing someone was true. I had interviewed my father before… And when I had questions to ask him he returned back to reality, which then took away the seriousness of the interview. He needed to stay in that state of mind, the past, his experience in Vietnam in order for me to really get a true understanding.
    When I first started reading your story I would have never guessed it was going to be about a dog. It was different. Well-written and unexpected. I also would like to add… that I liked the reference you made- referring a nurse to an angel!

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  • Correspondance wanted With Veitnam Veterans -- Janet Owenby, Sun, May 15 2005, 12:20:18 (68.112.26.68)
    I am looking for veterans from the Veitnam war who would be willing to share their personal stories and accounts with me for a book I am writing based on a fictional carachter who is a Vietnam Veteran. I have always thought the Veitnam Veterans have been treated unjustly since their return from the war and was outraged when I read a recent story posted on a webesite that stated their were no heroes In Veitnam. It is my personal opinion that any man who fought in the longest war in history under the type of inhumane conditions these American soldiers did and returned home to continue to fight the battle of being accepted by a society that had turned against the very men who fought for them is a hero in my book. I would also like to extend my condolences and gratitude to the families of those who lost a loved one to this war and let them know they are and always will be heros in my eyes. They are not forgotten. My hopes for the book I am writing is to show through a fictional carachter, the personal and emotional effects on Veitnam Veterans not only during the war, but after the war and how they were treated when they returned to society. If you would be willing to share your true stories feelings thoughts and emotions with me so I can better understand the truth and hopefully through a fictional charchter which young people can relate too help my younger generation to know the Veterans side of the story and not just the very little we were taught in our schools. To me it seems to be the war the world chooses to forget, but if we forget that war, especially now, will our American troops return from Iraq only to be treated like our Veitnam Veterans??????????????? Will history repeat itself through them????????

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  • how do i find out if i had a family member in the war -- aly girl, Tue, May 17 2005, 11:14:14 (209.139.2.100)
    i need to know if i had a family member that fought in the war that is very important to me and i would appreciate it if someone gave me information how to look of family members that has been in the war

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  • Mines -- Andrew Mckinney, Tue, May 10 2005, 17:46:14 (152.163.101.5)
    I’m high school student doing a project that requires me to give three reflections on three stories about the Vietnam War or three stories from Vietnam soldiers. I choose this story because I want to hear a story from a person that has been hit by a claymore or has seen someone hit by a claymore mine. My first question is did the claymore hurt and do you remember how you felt when the mine exploded? Like what was the first thing that went through your head when the mine exploded? While I was reading you said that while you were at the hospital you had holes or something in your chest. What were the holes and what made the holes? Was it from pieces of the mine or something or was it just made from the explosion. Also how big is a claymore explosion, like why is the explosion so powerful. Also is there a way to tell that there is a claymore mine on the ground or do you just walk and hope you don’t step on one. If you don’t know I wouldn’t know how to deal with the thought of not knowing where one is. If a claymore explodes on you wouldn’t your legs get blown off or something? If they did what happens to you after that if you live. Do you go back home or something? I heard that during the war if you were hurt or something you were sent back to the U.S, is that true. Did people ever get hurt on purpose just so they could leave? If you or someone, would be so nice to respond to this reflection, because its one of my requirements to my reflection and my teacher asked me to try and get some responses.

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  • scarey -- ashley, Mon, May 09 2005, 11:47:20 (209.42.42.145)
    i want to know if the war is scarey and how it fells to be out there fighting for are country? see my gramps was in the war before but he burned all his badges because it had bad memories.so plaese tell about the war and what is going on out there?

    ps: dont forget to write back back to me please because i need this is for a report.=)

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  • Bring back the Draft -- Larry Lusk, Thu, May 05 2005, 10:36:01 (66.215.42.86)
    Well, I hate to say this and take up BB space but it’s time to reinstitute the Daft. There are not enough Americans willing to go fight in Iraq. I can understand this, having been in combat no one in his or her right mind “wants” to be where bombs are exploding and bullets are flying. It is clear now that our New Army isn’t capable of fighting and winning a battle on “two” fronts. In Vietnam our armed forces even at the period of peak troop strength still maintained a strong enough force outside the Vietnam theater of operations to counter any other threats. The Pentagon estimate that if we pulled out of Iraq right now it would take at least a year to bring our combat capabilities up to pre-Iraq strength is unacceptable. I suspect that it will take longer than the time forecast by the Pentagon.

    A limited draft with everyone’s hat in the ring with the exception of police and firefighters would work. Just enough people to fulfill the estimated short fall in recruitment. No new training facilities would have to be built. When recruitment meets it’s quota no one would be drafted and draftees would be at the top of the list to “option out” no matter how long they had served.

    If someone feels that putting this power into the hands of our leaders again gives, the leaders, power to act irresponsibly then we are already in big trouble because we elected them or at least the ones who can hire and fire them. If you feel that the draft, even a limited one would cause great unrest among our population then we ought to take a harder look at what we’ve got ourselves involved in.

    Our Countries economy is tied closely to how secure from threats our people feel. During the Vietnam War I had friends who went on to collage and had no trouble getting jobs while I was “protecting” them. The economy was for the most in good shape during the period of the Vietnam conflict even though hundreds of thousands of men were drafted to serve in our Armed Forces. The people at home felt as secure (from outside attack) as they were before our involvement in Nam and even then the chance of being drafted and serving in a war zone was low.

    We need to do something soon because there are most definitely other enemies out there waiting for the chance to take a shot at us. Let’s not tempt fate too far.

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  • like a shadow -- eddie, Wed, May 11 2005, 10:53:04 (168.9.35.14)
    as my last reflection i choose like a shadow. Like a shadow
    Like a shadow is one of my favorite Vietnam war stories on this site. Helicopter gunfights in my opinion were one of the most interesting parts of Vietnam. After reading from your experiences it shows just how important helicopters were in the war for both attacking and protecting in a sense. While I was reading I began having visions on this movie that I saw called platoon. It’s just like this. One of my favorite things about your story was the part about Captain Payne. Another thing that had me thinking while reading your story was the part about air collisions. How often did these happen? It just made me think and compares the crashes we have today in this present war.
    I can only imagine how frightening that must’ve been to know that a gunship couldn’t get to you in time when the Viet cong had began to attack. Even though you guys didn’t have a gunship you held them all like you did. It really shows how much you guys wanted to live and get out of there. I’m sure it takes a lot to hold of a army especially in there turf.
    Doc Warden like you said seems very cool. I cant think of anyone who would risk they’re own lives to save someone else In that type of situation.. I couldn’t believe that he ran back into a fire fight that seemed to be raining bullets to save the driver. Like you said that had to be horrifying to watch. He gets back onto the helicopter with the driver and ultimately saves his life. Even when he was gashed he kept going. When you guys prayed that he could soon at some point receive his eye site back and it actually happened is amazing. God bless you and everyone else that has served in Vietnam.

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  • mines -- eddie, Wed, May 11 2005, 10:51:37 (168.9.35.14)
    im required by my teacher that i reflect upon 3 of these stories and as one i choose mines. Mines showed me they way how tense the Vietnam war was. There were a lot of things that really stood out to me. Like how you managed to help out some of your other comrades even when you your self was injured. That requires a lot of will power and the will to survive. When you were talking about the lift off onto the helicopter and how that you couldn’t feel anything, that must’ve been spine tingling.
    Anything could happen. When you notice that you’re numb that’s usually not a good sign but yet you kept calm. To think this all came from a single mine. All of a sudden you’re walking and then you’re 10 feet away from the place you were originally standing. I loved the part about how when the first copter came you helped your companions aboard even though you were hurt also. Like you said”hey im hurt too”.
    Even then you had your buddies on your mind. Even though the second helicopter landed down just seconds after, I can only imagine how long that must’ve felt to you. It seems so painful physically both mentally in this case. This story is seems so painful to think about. Its something only in your dreams you would think could happen. Like the part about the holes in your chest. I’m guessing that they came from the shards from the mine. That hurts just thinking about it. I don’t understand how anyone at anytime could with stand that while helping. When you said the medic was yelling at you so that you would stay awake it reminded me of this book that we read this year in school. Its called The things they carried. . It really showed how close together the men were in Vietnam. They were almost like brother. Everyone was dedicated not only to themselves but to there friends also

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  • from the other side -- danny, Wed, May 11 2005, 7:23:40 (168.9.35.14)
    Dear Mr. Camunes,

    Your story, "Thanks For Remembering" was one of the best war stories I have ever read. Even though it doesn’t deal with actual wartime combat, it is still an inspiring story dealing with Vietnam. It has so much emotion that is missing from most stories. It has made me appreciate what those men sacrificed so many years ago.

    At first when I read your story, I thought it was amazing. Then, just this past weekend, I had the opportunity to visit the Vietnam memorial, and I thought about your story often while I was there. I saw the hundreds of people walking in silence as they passed the lost. I saw the names of so many young men that had lost their lives in a meaningless war. As I came to the end of the wall, I touched the name of a man forever engraved into this magnificent wall, and I felt many different emotions. I was saddened by the fact he died for no apparent reason. But then I felt relief, knowing that he will always be remembered by being etched on the wall. He, and the rest of the 58,000 soldiers will always be remembered.

    I don’t think that I would have appreciated this visit without reading your story first. So just like those soldiers will never be forgotten, I will never forget you and your powerful story. You say “Thanks For Remembering,” but I say to you, “Thanks for writing.”

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  • pool party -- danny, Wed, May 11 2005, 7:21:01 (168.9.35.14)
    Dear Mr. Leeh,
    I have read many different stories on this site, and I find yours one of the happiest/funniest stories available. It shows the brighter side of the war, and I think that’s something that a lot of people would like to see or hear about. We’d like to hear less of all the bad that happened and more of the good that happened.
    I like the idea that the soldiers were able to have fun like that. It probably took a little bit of stress off of them from the war. And from your story, it seemed like the party was going great, but when “the invasion” took place, it seemed to make the party ten times better. But it seems that the higher officials did not approve of the naked locals. You had fun, and lightened the mood, so that’s all that really mattered.
    Now, as to the fact of me believing this story or not is the question. I believe that there was a pool party, and the officers did have “dollies”, but I think the part about the naked people crashing it is made up. It was put in there to make a regular war story seem like a great war story. And I did enjoy reading it very much, and I even laughed, I just believe that it is made up. This is just my opinion though. Please do not take it the wrong way. This story could very easily be true, and it could very easily be made up. Or maybe you just increased the number of people that came, like instead of 30 people maybe it was just 10. Or maybe it was a surprise to everyone, like the naked locals decided themselves that they should crash this American pool party. Only you and a few others really know what happened, but that’s just what I think.

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  • Thanks For Remembering -- Danny, Wed, May 11 2005, 6:23:56 (168.9.35.14)

    Dear Mr. Camunes,

    Your story, "Thanks For Remembering" was one of the best war stories I have ever read. Even though it doesn’t deal with actual wartime combat, it is still an inspiring story dealing with Vietnam. It has so much emotion that is missing from most stories. It has made me appreciate what those men sacrificed so many years ago.

    At first when I read your story, I thought it was amazing. Then, just this past weekend, I had the opportunity to visit the Vietnam memorial, and I thought about your story often while I was there. I saw the hundreds of people walking in silence as they passed the lost. I saw the names of so many young men that had lost their lives in a meaningless war. As I came to the end of the wall, I touched the name of a man forever engraved into this magnificent wall, and I felt many different emotions. I was saddened by the fact he died for no apparent reason. But then I felt relief, knowing that he will always be remembered by being etched on the wall. He, and the rest of the 58,000 soldiers will always be remembered.

    I don’t think that I would have appreciated this visit without reading your story first. So just like those soldiers will never be forgotten, I will never forget you and your powerful story. You say “Thanks For Remembering,” but I say to you, “Thanks for writing.”

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  • My enemy -- Andrew Mckinney, Tue, May 10 2005, 17:12:33 (152.163.101.5)
    I’m high school student doing a project that requires me to give three reflections on three stories about the Vietnam War or three stories from Vietnam soldiers. I choose your story because it sounded so interesting that I decided to write about it. The First thing that I want to know is if you were on the opposite side of the U.S. Also did you ever serve in any way for the U.S? If you did which side do you believe was worth fighting for. Did you like being in Vietnam? How long did you live there? I’m asking a lot of questions because I want to hear someone’s actual thought about the war since they were in it. While I was reading your story you said that you were ambushed. You also said that you were shot right, and that you saw an American soldier looking at you in a sad kind of way. How did you fill when you saw him? Did you have a life changing moment right then and there? Because I know I would especially if I believed that I was going to die right then and now. I would probably think about how much I wished that the war had never happen and why do we have to wars in the first place. What person would want to loose a son or brother or just anybody close to them because of a feud between two or more countries? Did you ever think about what you did for your country was it worth it and do you believe you did the right thing? If you or someone, would be so nice to respond to this reflection, because its one of my requirements to my reflection and my teacher asked me to try and get some responses.

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  • Questions -- Ann, Tue, May 10 2005, 8:10:57 (208.20.43.194)
    If ther is any one out ther that will hape me? And ansor some Questions please e mail me.
    Thanks
    Ann

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  • Camouflage -- Andrew Mckinney, Thu, May 05 2005, 10:16:40 (168.9.35.14)
    I’m high school student doing a project that requires me to give three reflections on three stories about the Vietnam War or three stories from Vietnam soldiers. I choose yours as one because it seems pretty funny. It took me a while to finally figure out what was so funny about being camouflaged. After I saw the picture on the side it made more since so I had to choose yours because it was just funny. I hope you didn’t really look like that picture because that’s not being camouflage. This would make since why officer Cory Hart never asked you to camouflage again while you were on your tour of duty. Did you really believe you were camouflaged? In your story you say, “I walked for several more yards behind him and finally grew tired of the game I was playing and threw the leaf beside the trail and continued on that mission. Were you playing a game or something and what was the mission that you were on. The one thing that I find hard to believe is a leaf that was as big as you. In the picture I think it said you were 6’8. If that’s true that must mean that the leaf was pretty big. I’m 5’8, so does that mean that the leaf would be bigger than me. I could see my self-using the leaf as a cover when I go to sleep if I were in Vietnam. Did you ever try something like that while you were in Vietnam? What is a K bar? Is it a gun or something? Did anybody actually believe that you were camouflaged, because I bet you if you were like that when its dark someone would probably think you were a tree? You know what you should of done, you should of stood next to other leaves like the one you were wearing because you would probably look like another leaf to any person that didn’t know you were there. Maybe the holes in the leaf gave you away because I probably would have never found you if I didn’t know you were there. The thing you did is the kind of thing I would expect from a second grader. You were probably the best hide and go seek person when you were young. You know what I think I will do I think I will try exactly what you did if I can find a leaf that big somewhere and I will try to hide from some body and see if they can find me. If you or someone, would be so nice to respond to this, because its one of my requirements to my reflection for my project.

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  • 30 Years -- Wayne Gregory, Sun, May 01 2005, 0:34:23 (209.240.205.60)
    At 8:55am on April 30, 1975, the last Americans, 10 Marines departed from the U.S. Embassy in Saigon. Ending the U.S. presence in Vietnam. NVA troops poured into Saigon with little resistance. 11am the North Vietnam flag flew over the Presidential Palance and President Duong Van Minh broadcast a message of unconditional surrender. 1130 am, NVA tanks smashed thru the gates of the Presidential Palance. The War was Over!

    Thirty years later, the brave men and women who served together in this conflict have recieved little recognition. Only a Veteran can know a Veteran. Veterans are a brotherhood, like no other. Soldiers do not make policy, we only follow orders.

    Letter recieved in regard to the 30th Year Remembrance of the Vietnam War.

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  • 13th day - 13th mission -- Mark Witt, Sun, May 08 2005, 6:27:29 (68.200.38.67)
    I submitted a war story a few years ago called 13th day- 13th mission about a B-57 mission. The link I set up says the page does not exist. Where is it?

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  • War Stories Chat Room? -- Pat (Beanie) Camunes, Tue, February 15 2005, 9:54:17 (66.25.88.75)
    I have been in contact with Don Poss concerning a possible “chat room” linked to War Stories. Don has agreed to set up a chat room for us but I need some suggestions as to what type of room it should be. There’s the question of should it be a monitored or an unmonitored site. Being that WS is a site for Student Research I would like to have a place for students to participate but also do we want to have a separate, even passworded site for the veterans themselves? And that brings up the question of how do we keep out “wannabes” especially responding to students without getting into personal info?

    I feel that our present Rules and Guidelines for posting on this bulletin board could be used for a chat room with a small bit of modification. I also feel that I can take on the possibility of managing a chat site but would need a couple of assistants to help out and take the rein when necessary. I look forward to suggestions on this board or email and especially the possibility of a chat room where we’ll be able to communicate at a more personal level.

    ANYONE can send me their landline number and I’ll be more than glad to give you a call since I have unlimited long distance. I’d really look forward to it and I’ll be waiting on suggestions and anxious to get going on what I feel could be a very popular chat room. . . . . . . . . . . . Beanie

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  • Suicide Alley Cam Ranh Bay Run -- Karen Steele, Fri, April 01 2005, 18:35:24 (141.152.163.199)
    My Dad served two tours in Vietnam. The first tour 1966-1967 [Naval Support DaNang RVN], the second tour 1971-1972 [Naval Facility Support Cam Ranh Bay]. His reasoning was that it would keep some other kid from going. I remember him before he left [my brothers and sisters don't] and I remember him when he came home after the second tour. We became targets when he would have his "daydreams" our nightmares, that is he shot at us. When he was asleep you did NOT touch him to wake him up. He has NEVER talked about those times at all. Now he is going into hie early sixties and I finally got one simple sentence from him. That was,he drove "suicide alley". I would like to know some more about it. He only told me this because I needed some information for a job with a high security clearance for the last 20 years of his career. My Dad retired after 32 years in the military, a lifer. Thank you very much. I am going to get my Dad to write his stories if he will not talk about them, or try anyway.

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  • to anyone who was a pointperson in vietnam between 1968-1970 -- velazquez, gilbert t., Sun, May 01 2005, 10:55:07 (4.246.138.247)
    i am attemptng to locate my captain lee a smith it is very crucial, please help.

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  • To "Heavens door" -- eddie terry, Thu, May 05 2005, 10:10:27 (168.9.35.14)
    After reading Heavens door im astonished at the level of acheivement that 377th combat security police at tan son nhut could do against such a force. Against almost impossible odd you guys prevailed. Almost completely caught off guard, you guys readyed up and prepared yourselves for the worst. I feel like im actaully there after reading it. I can almost taste the adrenaline; the rockets blasting, and the rapid machine gun fire, and the sound of many echoing voices. (im sure im far from the real thing and can probably never completely understand how it was though). I can imagine how great it mustve felt when the choppers arrived. Like you said, it gave you the fighting edge that you needed. I am a high school student and i have been reading the book The things they carried and after reading this personal experience, i beleive every word of what was happening. I noticed how you said you were scared. Even tho you were you still did your duties as a soilder. The author of the book tells about this type of thing. He goes into detail about things like how your actions became almost automatic. If it were me out there i probably wouldve froze in placek knowing that a fellow bunker had been over ran and mine could be next.The part about your companions charging your bunker and you not knowing who they were really adds to the fear also.It shows how limited thinking time that you had and how fast you could be killed It hard to believe that you guys could hold them off for days on in. Battle of tet in my opinion was one of those battles that really show the american will to prevail. Your story is truly inspiring. Take care.

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  • Robert W. Seaton -- Kira Seaton, Tue, May 03 2005, 15:48:39 (68.252.173.97)
    I am working on a journal about my trip to Washington DC. While I was there I found a distant relative on the Vietnam Wall and I would like to have some info about him to include in my journal. If any one has infomation on him at all I would be very grateful. A personal story would be fabulous. Thanks for the help in advance.
    Kira

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  • THANKS FOR YOUR HELP -- TONY DODSON 2/1 CAVALRY 6/32 ARTY, Tue, April 19 2005, 10:40:34 (138.32.32.44)
    Hey Larry Northridge, just wanted to get back to you and tell you thanks for the lead. The Ms. Childress lead panned out. The email address was not functional, but I googled her name and a tracked down a school board work email address. She got back to me, and tracked down David Chaney's Brother, who called me at work. Like you said, those Hill Folk are a tight bunch. Ms. Childress relayed our story to Steve (Dave's Brother), and he confided in her that over all these years he often wonder what happened to that Bowie Knife. Now he knows. Our old Supply Sgt, Sgt Kosteck, has taken up point and is coordinating the ceremony at the grave site in Lexington Ky. According to the feedback I'm hearing, I think we have created a little buzz down there in the Blue Grass. I'll keep you guys abreast of the goings on as they develop. THANKS AGAIN GUYS FOR EVERTHING. You guys are definitely changing lives out here. God Bless all of you. ANIMO ET FIDE. SCOUTS OUT

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  • Looking for those who knew SGT Larry Bertagna HHC 3rd/1st, 11th LIB KIA 7/27/69 -- Kelly Keefer, Thu, April 28 2005, 8:48:27 (67.139.116.166)
    I am a relative and am visiting the Memorial Wall in DC soon. I was a baby when he was killed and never had the chance to know him. Any information, photos, etc. would be greatly appreciated as my family finds it difficult to talk about him and the war. From doing online research, I believe he ended up at FSB 4-11 in the Quang Ngai province and was killed there July 27,'69 in a recoilless rifle attack. Another report (from the NARA site under ADD),states that he "died while MIA" (casualty status #13) and that the "major attributal cause" was "not intentional homicide"(H category), so it's a little confusing. I've been told all of my life that his bunker was bombed. He was an E5,Tactical Communications Chief, in the Americal Division,3rd Battalion,1st Infantry and the 11th Lt Inf Bde. He started serving in Vietnam on 11-19-68. He may have served with/under Lt.Col. George Ellis and Col. Jack Treadwell? Any information or rememberance of him, large or small would be greatly appreciated - thank you,
    Kelly Keefer

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  • J.B.Jones "Warrior's last Prayer" -- Joe Graham, Thu, April 28 2005, 17:57:39 (205.188.116.202)
    Don Poss
    I just came upon this web site and I was blown away by your poam about JB Jones.
    I was Jimmy's OJT trainer at Forbes AFB, in Topeka, Kansas
    in 1965.We all volunteered together to go to Nam.It beat the Missle sites in Grand Forkes, No.Dekota.I think about Jimmy every day since that night he was killed.He was only 19 years old, an only son. I seem to remember that he had a kid sister and he came from Alexandra Bay in west New York.
    When I went down to DC to see our Wall,I took Jimmy's name off the wall etched onto a piece of paper.
    I have often thought over the past 30 + years of going to Alexandra Bay,New York to visit Jimmy's grave and to perhaps try and find his family.I could never seem to find the time or the courage.I guess I still grieve him.

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  • Do you think she was a scapegoat? -- Sherry, Thu, April 28 2005, 12:17:32 (168.12.253.67)
    I am referring to the woman who was honorably discharged from the National Guard for mud wrestling and flashing her breasts even though she was encourage to do so by sergents and other female guards mud wrestling.

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  • Dennis Guy Benson -- Lynn A. Stover, Sun, April 17 2005, 18:50:04 (68.163.187.86)
    I am looking for any information on Dennis,He was killed on 12/23/68 in Nam in a chopper accident. He was in the Army
    E4...name is on the wall....please help me....thank-you all so much for your help in that senseless war....That took all are love ones away....one way or another

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  • Looking for CWO Paul Auerbach -- Edward Marshall, Fri, March 25 2005, 20:58:01 (4.26.159.181)
    Trying to locate: CWO Paul Auerbach
    Branch of Service: Army
    Unit was: 1/21 Inf
    Where served: Dong Ha, Phu Bai, Quang Tri
    When served: 1968
    Message is: You were in charge of personnel, either batallion or brigade. I was an african American soldier who worked for you in the personnel office as a clerk
    Please contact: Sp4 E-4 Edward Marshall
    Mailing address:
    City, State, Zip: Loma Linda, Ca. 92354

    emarsh39@hotmail.com

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  • ANDERSON DALE EDWARD, SP4 E4 A Accident date 19680221 NEW LISBON -- Heidi Hoogstra, Tue, April 26 2005, 13:18:30 (12.215.75.138)
    I am looking for information on my uncle. He trained in Fort Bliss, TX. Went to Vietnam and was killed on 1968/02/21. I am looking to hear from anyone who would have information on what he was like. If you do happen to have pictures of him I would love to see them. I never had the chance to meet him. My mother can not tell me anything, for she to young to remember what he was like. And the only one who could tell me anything (my grandfather) passed away. I would really like to hear something from anyone. Please help me.

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  • Re: Anglico? -- erath gary m., Tue, March 22 2005, 17:11:46 (66.215.121.222)
    using friend's computer. looking for anyone who severed sub unit 1 1st platoon 2nd ROK BRIGADE hoian 69-71. was on chopper which tried to rescue marine either in 2nd or 3rd battalion. must have been either during mooson or during typoon which in 70. having hard time with VA about name and dates. sorry, only knew him as PAPI. any help greatly appreciated. semper fi cpl.gary m erath

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  • Women that affected your service -- Stephanie Dildine, Tue, April 19 2005, 19:06:48 (24.255.5.82)
    Hi. I'm doing a report on the influence of Women in Vietnam War and I was wondering if you could tell me how they influence you. Were you for or against women serving in Vietnam? Did you feel the need to protect them from harm or did you treat them as you would have any other soldier? Thanks so much, your site was very informative.

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  • i never felt -- Chelsea, Thu, January 13 2005, 16:33:29 (24.62.149.83)
    i am sorry you had to kill i dont belivie in killing another person even if i change there names so they dont sound human and it easy to kill them. i could never go to war. and i honor those you can those who can fight to the death for my freedom , i do care for my freedom but i just can kill in not in my blood. and i am sorry for what you had to do but hopefully time help heal that wond

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  • Looking for Vietnam Vet from 101st Airborne 1969-1970 -- Stefani Doss, Fri, April 01 2005, 7:51:01 (205.204.234.70)
    Hello. I am looking for a young man that was in the 101st Airborne Division as an SP4 around 1969-1970. All I know about him, for certain, is that his name is K. Walker and he served in the Army during Vietnam. He has some type of association with the Tuy Hoa Province (the spelling may be incorrect). I am trying to locate him do to the fact that, while visiting Vietnam last November, the CEO of my company bought a cigarette lighter off of a street vender in HoChiMinh City. He noticed on one side of it was the insignia of the 101st Airborne Division and the following: "SP4 K. Walker, 1969-1970, Tuy Hoa Province." I have checked "The Wall" and there is one possible match, Kurtess Howard Walker, but do not know if this is a perfect match. We are wanting to get the cigarette lighter back to this fine American soldier or, at least, to his family.
    Any information on this topic of interest would be greatly appreciated.
    Thank you,
    Stefani Doss

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  • wayne blake -- wendy, Fri, April 22 2005, 22:27:03 (152.163.101.5)
    I am looking for any one who might have severd in the war with wayne v blake he was from huntington wv I am his daughter and I would like to know more about him he passed away two and half years ago and I dont really know much about him serving in the war he saved a few of his fellow soliders in the war and i didnt find that out untill his funrel if anyone has any info please contact me my email is clevywr26@aol.com

    searching for answers
    Wendy

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  • Vietnam wall-names omitted -- jack wright, Thu, April 21 2005, 20:59:19 (132.235.203.142)
    I lost 2 buddies in Vietnam whose names do not
    appear on the wall. I'm bummed.

    S/Sgt.Kenneth Arrent -1st Cav, killed in a road ambush
    Spc 4 Nicholas Morales 1st Cav transferred to 176th infantry

    both killed in 1967

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  • 6/32nd FA-Cung Son -- Murphy Cowart, Thu, April 21 2005, 21:39:54 (64.136.27.225)
    I was stationed with an 8"/175mm composite battery in Cung Son in 1968-69. It was totally boring duty, but I am trying to write it down for my grandsons. If you were there during that time and remember names/events...please contact me (or if you just want to say "hi").

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  • Eli Knighton -- KD Keels, Wed, April 20 2005, 13:36:33 (207.156.48.96)
    I am looking for information on Eli Whitney Knighton, Jr. from Florida. He was killed when he stepped on a land mine in July of 1969 in Vietnam.

    I would like to hear form someone that knew him.

    Thank You!

    KDK / 04/20/2005

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  • Thanks -- Arthur Acoya III, Wed, April 20 2005, 10:34:34 (63.229.166.110)
    My name is Arthur Acoya and I am a seventeen year old high school student and I stumbled upon your site one day while doing research on the Vietnam war and it is great to see all the pictures you people post and being able to read what you experienced. I realized that some of you brave men and women were not much older then I was when you went over sea’s to serve your country and I would like to thank you for that and would like to apologize for the things you had to see and the horrible homecoming most of you received when you returned home. I just hope that I can be as brave as you when my time comes to serve my country.

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  • help me find my great grandpa Russell Cole he was in the big red one world war two -- jansen white, Tue, April 19 2005, 16:57:45 (24.159.122.144)
    Hi i am lookin to see if any world war two vets from the first infantry division can tell me if you knew my great grandpa his name was Russell Cole he was in the big red one and fought in africa and he was one of the the first to storm normandy beach i just know a couple of stories that he told my dad and i know that he carried a BAR he had a friend that carried a tommy gun and that is all that i know and that my great grandpa was shot in the shin when he was in Africa after he got home he drank most of it away and they think that he had a stroke and hit his head and that is also another readon that he forgot stuff and i am only 14 and all of this happened when i was a baby so he never did tell me much but we would go see him where he was and i remember him lookin out the window and ducking down and saying (look the germans are getting closer and will take us if we dont get reinforcements now!) and i think that something like this happened to him in world war two and he was haveing flashbacks that is all that i know and when he died a couple years back i told my self that i was going in the army and i was going to find out more about him so here i am please if you know ANYTHING about him can you PLEASE tell me thank you...

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  • AMERICAN FLAG RETIREMENT -- Charles Taliaferro, Mon, April 18 2005, 11:49:44 (205.157.151.18)
    You can retire your tattered, worn out and frayed American flags without cost to you. Send your flags to the Kitchen Table Gang Trust, 42922 Avenue 12, Madera, CA 93638-8866 and we will dispose of your flags in a proper and dignified manner with full honors and dignity pursuant to the United States Flag Code Section 8K. We have been providing this free service for he past seven years. Our flag retirement ceremonies are held on Flag Day, June 14th each year and are conducted by an all volunteer U.S. Marine Corps Honor Guard led by GySgt. Dan Kelley USMC (Ret.).

    Thanks,

    Charles Taliaferro
    ctaliaferro@kitchentablegang.org
    THE KITCHEN TABLE GANG TRUST
    http://www.kitchentablegang.org

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  • Richard Cunnare's No greater love -- jonah, Wed, April 13 2005, 13:55:46 (24.151.70.72)
    Your story opened my eyes to the truth. That it was not only the fighting men who risked their lives but the medical units that tried to save them. I found the beginning calming. How you sat on a boat just enjoying the scenery. It really shows the innocence of a country on the outside. The idea that you felt the tension rising as you got closer affect me. It seems as if you knew you were coming to the end. It must be painful seeing what you had to see. The people you would save. The lives that they would half to continue after a horrible ordeal. Its funny that people don’t usually think of the medics who saved so many young men’s lives, and remembers the soldiers who die but not the medics. I can’t imagine what it is like to stand next to a friend in there dieing hour and hold their hand while they’re slipping away. I feel so sorry for the pain that this war caused to everybody. I hope people will remember the sacrifices that you and your friend made, not to fight the war but to save those who fell in battle.

    Sincerely
    Jonah Schwartz

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  • NEED YOUR HELP TO BRING CLOSURE -- TONY DODSON/ A TRP 2/1 CAVALRY 69-70, Fri, April 15 2005, 17:57:20 (152.163.101.5)
    Fellas, I'm in need of your help, especially that of Jeff Northridge. Jeff, I've noticed that you have the uncanny knack of digging up all types of info and/or persons. Here's my problem. While at the last Blackhawk Reunioin (2/1 Cavalry) in Branson Mo. this summer, one of my guys "The Reverend" relayed a long kept story to us. One of his tank crew, David Chaney (KIA 31 Aug 70), had given him his prized Bowie Knife making Rev promise that if he did not make it out of Nam, that Rev would make sure that his family in Kentucky would get the Bowie. Well you can just imagine the shock when we heard this. Rev finally got comfortable enough to open up and relay this story. Now we all have the mission. Here is where you guys come in. I had been in touch with one of David's cousins, Ms Judy Chaney Bullock. Alas, in my old age, I've somehow misplaced/lost her phone number. I do however have a mailing address, but Ms. Bullock has yet to respond to my last snail mail. If you guys can use your Midas Touch, and dig up a phone number or email address, we would be forever be beholding to you (as if we don't already owe you guys enough for helping us get back together after thirty or more years). We all want to meet in Lexington Ky. at Dave's grave site and make the presentation to his family. By the way, David along with Sgt Edictor Rivera-Montez were the last two Troopers in our unit to be KIA before the colors were sent home in Oct of 1970. They were both on the same lead tank that bore the initial brunt of an RPG ambush in the Song Mao AO in II Corps. Judy's address is : Judy Bullock Po Bx 4028, Mt. Vernon, Kentucky, 40456. Hope you guys can help us Old Scout Doggies out. Feel free to email me directly at KAATUN@AOL.COM. Thanks much, Tony Dodson, SCOUTS OUT.

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  • Vietnam Feb. 1962 -- Dave Hillsamer, Thu, April 12 2001, 18:09:12 (63.122.79.227)
    Seeking anyone who was in Dak Bron valley some miles north of Dak To in February 1962 or at MAAG HQ in Saigon at same time. Need verification for Agent Orange claim due to my diabetes. Spraying started mid January 1962, about a month earlier. Also like to contact crew of HOG-21 that carried us in or medivaced me out. Please email any leads or info. It is tough after 39 years.

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  • Tan Son Nhut '72 Army/AF Security dog-handlers -- Russ Martin, Sun, April 10 2005, 21:53:16 (69.29.84.214)
    I "was" Sgt. E.R. Martin, Military Police Customs Inspector and drug-dog handler assigned to H.Q.& H.Q.'s Co, MACV. Worked with Joint Military Customs Group-Saigon Area from Feb.'72 until July 15, '72 when we were reassigned to the 716th M.P. Company. Looking for Tommy Campbell from Detroit. He spent this same time period up at Phu Bai and never was quite right after that. Part of my PTSD recovery is to find him and see if his is alright.

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  • Dak To Defenders. 1969 -- Jay Gearhart, Mon, January 31 2005, 9:40:07 (24.236.212.221)
    Hello, brothers. I"m Jay Gearhart & I served with, ,2nd Plt 15th Engr Co. (LE) 299th CBT Engr. BT.Having a 299th CBT. Engr. BT. Reunion in Reno, NV. on July 28th thru Aug 1"st, 2005. All brothers who served with this unit are invited, from WW II through Iraqi Freedom. Please contact me at E mail address. Thanks, Jay.

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  • Searching for those who served with Jeff Jones -- Pamela Astin, Thu, March 31 2005, 16:59:40 (64.12.117.5)
    Hi everyone. First, let me say to all you veterans, Thank You and Welcome Home! You deserved a lot better than what you got. I'm hoping that someone can help me find any of the guys that served with Jefferson C. Jones (North Carolina) 1/8 INF C&E Co. 4th DIV 1968-69. He was recently diagnosed with PTSD and is just now learning to deal with it. He talks a lot about his buddies he served with and I would like to reunite them if possible. I think it would be really good for him. He was called "Jonesy" or "Jeffro" and the ones he can recall are as follows; "Top" 1st Sgt., "Buzz" from NE state, "Tennessee" from Tenn., "Stick" Chicago, "William" Kentucky, "Joe", "Mitch" from the south, and "Louisiana" from Louisiana. Their co. was nicknamed "Highangle Hell". I appreciate any help you can give me with this. I love him and just want him to have a little peace in his life for once. Thank You, Pam

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  • thank you -- daisey, Mon, April 04 2005, 4:24:21 (141.157.35.222)
    I just want to thank the veterns for all their hard work and may God blessed you. All of you mean alot to me THANK!!!!

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  • george de angelis -- daisy, Thu, March 17 2005, 21:21:09 (69.135.121.121)
    hi,
    I am trying to help the father of my children find anyone who knew him in vietnam.he served from 7/31/67 to 3/13/69
    he was in qui nhon during the tet offensive.he rembers seeing his best freind, duane c romeo get killed and having to police the body through research this was on 2/23/69.also going up in the mountains surrounding the city ans encountering combat there,.
    any one remember him??

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  • Fiddler's Green -- Jack Stoddard, Fri, April 01 2005, 8:07:31 (68.108.185.121)
    My second book "Fiddler's Green" is now out in print at http://www.wastelandpress.net/Fiddler.html. I think you old soldiers will enjoy it, especially you cavalry types. Jack Stoddard- Vietnam, 1968-69-70-71.

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  • Re: Petition for Concurrent Receipt of Military Retired Pay and VA Disability Compensation -- albert c collins, Thu, March 31 2005, 20:51:02 (67.33.192.45)
    i served in nam and got hurt and have ptsd and any thing you could think of. i agree we should get both.

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  • Re: The REAL Scott Helvenston -- Gary Helms, Thu, March 31 2005, 13:04:47 (216.12.192.74)
    Scott,

    It's been a year buddy and still the sad memories linger of that terrible day. March 31, 2004 will always be a cloudy day in my memories.

    I still have the last e-mail you sent me, i printed it because I knew it was our last conversation here on earth.

    I know your children are going to be fine, our hevenly father is watching over them daily.

    Just missing a true friend.

    Always the quest,
    Gary

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  • Looking for pictures of Cliff Green for widow -- Michael L Hunter, Mon, March 28 2005, 13:24:09 (24.10.179.1)
    I am in contact with the widow of PFC-E-3 Clifford Newton Green I believe a gunner of the 118th Assult Helicopter Co.,145 Bat. 12th group 1st Brigade, Bien Hoa. I can't remember if he was in the Choppers or the Scorpions. His tour started Aug 02,1969 and he was shot March 21st 1970 in Long An on a flight. He died after returning to the states. I sent his gear to his wife but the pictures and camera had been ruined by moisture and sand. I am in contact with her and she would like information and pictures of him if anyone out there knows him. I,Rabbit, was the night T.I of maintance platoon. Anything guys even if it is another name to contact. It might close a few wounds for me too.

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  • Looking for Information -- Paul, Sun, March 27 2005, 12:32:30 (216.176.89.65)
    Hi I'm Paul and I have an Uncle that was mortally wounded in Vietnam. He is Sgt. Michael William Kenter. He was in the 1st Infantry Division, 18th Infantry, 1st Battalion, Company A. I would just like to know more information about him and his battles. Thank You.

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  • Looking for someone who knew David Herren -- Susan, Wed, February 09 2005, 21:20:21 (205.188.116.137)
    I am looking for anyone who may have served in the Navy with my uncle. His name is David Ralph Herren. He was on the U.S.S. Constillation during Vietnam. He never talked about his time in the Navy. I am curious as to what he was like back then and what it was like on the ship. Any information would be great. I have a picture if a face will help remember the name.
    eubanks_susan@yahoo.com

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  • Quinlan Roberts Orell -- Nelda Morgan, Wed, March 23 2005, 9:46:17 (216.229.193.10)
    I have had a POW/MIA Bracelet since the 70s with Capt. Orell's name and date inscribed. I would like to share this with his family if anyone could locate any of them. I called information for Ohio and didn't get a number. Please advise if anyone knows a way to locate them.

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  • Vietnam 1971-1972 -- Roy A Blair, Tue, March 22 2005, 7:55:11 (65.0.100.104)
    Need information on missions or combat patrols of Co B & Co D 17th Infantry USArmy in Vietnam 1971-1972 MOS11B20 Pleiku? Camrahn Bay? Got anything to share? RABlair

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  • Must See video: Iraqi Election -- Don Poss, Thu, February 03 2005, 18:44:19 (67.127.197.29)
    Gents: I've still got goose bumps from watching the <a rel=nofollow target=_blank href="http://adamkeiper.blogs.com/comparevideo/files/Iraq_Election.wmv">Iraqi Election</a> Video. Check it out now! Makes me proud of our troops and of <b>W</b>. I'm glad someone cares enough to put something like this video together.

    Don Poss

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  • 9th ID Vietnam MARS -- Tom NE7X, Fri, March 18 2005, 10:37:50 (143.182.124.1)
    I pulled together over 100 pictures of when I was in Vietnam 1976 & 1968, 9th ID, Bearcat and Dong Tam. I was a full time MARS radio operator. Here is the link to my website:

    http://www.ne7x.com/web_pages/vietnam1968.html

    Hope you enjoy my website, Tom...

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