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  • Welcome Home, Soldier -- Nate, Fri, January 14 2005, 4:55:04 (24.62.241.203)
    Dear writer,
    I think you have pointed out a subject that I feel very strongly about. How can a man be old enough to serve and die for his country, but still to young for the same country to give him alcohol? It’s like doing a favor and getting attacked by the same person you helped. It just doesn’t make much sense.

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  • Name wrong -- Lily LittleSun Harms, Thu, March 17 2005, 11:00:05 (65.67.206.10)
    the last name of my Uncle PFC Thomas Lee LittleSun is entered under Little. My Uncle was a Marine who gave his life on 2/16/68. PLEASE correct the last name to LITTLESUN.

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  • Still Remembering -- Denny J. Walthers, Thu, March 10 2005, 18:13:29 (216.48.24.194)
    As part of the Provisionary 133 Air Wing, Arc Lite from the 320th Bomb Wing at Mather in 1965, I still remember the loss we suffered on 18-June-1965. Our loss and their lives will be remembered forever.

    When you visit the wall, whether in DC or the travelling one, please pay your respects to these men who were lost when two of our B-52's ran into each other during refueling on the way to Nam during the first use of B-52's in actual combat.

    Name Panel Row
    Robert Armond 02E 013
    James Gehrig Jr 02E 012
    Tyrrell Lowry 02E 012
    James Marshall 02E 012
    William Neville 02E 012
    Harold Roberts 02E 011
    Joe Robertson 02E 013
    Frank Watson 02E 014

    I continue to thank all of our faithful military for their service even in the wake of the negative publicity that the media continues to send out.

    We were there, the comfortable media here in the states was not.

    Denny J. Walthers

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  • rose/flag request of 03/04/05 -- P. David Brackin, Tue, March 08 2005, 19:41:25 (209.240.205.63)
    I live in Jacksonville, FL. This September the traveling wall is coming to our community for a visit and I plan to volunteer to man the wall during its visit. I will comply with your request at that time in honor of my comrades.

    As First Vice of the Beaches' Honor Guard, who's duty it is is to honor at the time of their passing the brave service men and women who have served our country, it will be a priviledge to fulfil this duty to my fellow Nam warvets CPL Edwin Ray Travnicek, SP4 James Don Honeycutt and SP4 Roberto Rocha, Jr. for you at that time so the people of the Jacksonville area can see that everyone on the wall is still deserving their favor.

    If you should have a specific color of rose or message you would like to contribute please contact me and I will try to comply.

    God bless you, and God bless the United States of America.

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  • Writing screenplay of my tour in Vietnam -- Michael A.Freude, Sun, March 06 2005, 18:39:50 (4.40.110.197)
    NAM. "Boo-Coo Dinky-Dow" is the title of my screenplay. It took me a long time to even think about writing it. I have PTSD. It's brought back bad memories, but I think it's also helping me. I'm only halfway through the story, but if anyone would like to read what I have so far, please e-mail me and I'll attach it to your e-mail. I have also wrote stories of my nightmares, not pretaining to Nam, but probably caused them. Here's a list of my stories. If you are interested in any of them, I'll send out a copy for my surviving brothers, or to the families of Vets.

    1-NAM "BOO-COO DINKY-DOW" STILL IN PROGRESS
    2-TANK FARM
    3-HAYWIRE
    4-THE MAN IN THE GREEN TRENCH COAT
    5-MURDERS ALLEYWAY

    Have a safe one and a good one.

    MadManMike

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  • Vietnam Music -- Joe, Sun, March 06 2005, 16:19:31 (68.76.119.143)
    If I recall some people were asking about Vietnam related music a few months ago. I came across a link today which features most. You can choose and listen at this link.
    http://chu65nang67.topcities.com/nam/vietnam.html

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  • AFVN Radio shows, Vietnam war -- Chuck Kenney, SFC, USA (Ret), Sat, March 05 2005, 23:11:38 (209.240.205.63)
    My 2nd post here now, my 1st was in 2001...here we are in 2005...My afvn shows have grown..appx 82 hours now, from country, to pop-rock n roll...most full shows as broadcast during the Vietnam war years. I also have Vietnam radio commo from bunkers and aircraft. These from tapes..now on Cd's...Many Vietnam vet's love these...as it brings back the good memorie's of the Big VN...I donate much to veterans from the proceeds of these shows...and to Vet homeless shelter's and home's for homeless vet's...Contact me anytime by e-mail for more info. As a former Armed Forces Radio DJ, the news, info, and entertainment thru music..it helped our troops then...just as it does some 60 years later...from WWII to Vietnam, and now in Iraq...AFN "Freedom Radio"... afn, still giving and trying to help in uncertain times. My best to all our past and present day warrior's fighting for "Freedom" and what it stands for...Chuck Kenney.

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  • SGT Paul E. LaTourette - KIA Oct 20, 1967 in Long An -- James M. LaTourette, Sat, March 05 2005, 9:01:31 (64.12.116.137)
    I was only 3 years old when I met Uncle Paul. He visited our family prior to shipping out in late 1966. Unfortunately I have no memory of this visit. I am looking for anyone who knew Paul, and would be willing to share memories and stories. I thank you in advance for your generosity.

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  • ROSE/FLAG REQUEST -- Amanda Ferrell, Fri, March 04 2005, 10:51:11 (208.145.195.105)
    I am requesting a rose for Edwin Ray Travnicek CPL Wall 08e 062 on behalf of his family and a flag beside Honeycutt James Don SP4 Wall 08E 060 and Rocha Roberto JR SP4 on wall 08E 061 who was in the same truck when my uncled died. God Bless and Thank You!!

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  • try to find my old outfit buddies the 36 th combat engr. regt. -- Robert Price, Sun, February 27 2005, 9:51:18 (64.5.169.30)
    I was in the 3rd. batt. I co. of the 36 th engrs. from Africa 1943 to Austria 1945. If anyone knows the where abouts of these following guys ; please contact me !!!!!! Willie Uzdrowski -Chicago ;Walter Stanislas Filas ;Detroit; Wm. Pietrzak -Chicago WM. (Blackie )Guare ; Ill.Edmund Sullivan- Buffalo , N.Y. ;Lawrence Kowalski-Mich.;L.G. Phillips -Alabama; Jesse Bellamy - Wisc.; Adam Gioglio- Washington , N.J.; Ed Devino - Conn. Bob Price - Phone# 330-627-2093e-mail reprice@tusco.net Carrollton,Ohio

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  • Who is a "War Hero"? -- Larry Lusk, Tue, February 22 2005, 11:26:26 (66.214.54.226)
    The term “Hero” in wartime is a very subjective concept. We can all agree on one level that a person who was awarded the Medal of Honor is a hero. If you ask one, however, he will most likely tell you that he doesn’t consider himself to be a hero. My second Company Commander in Vietnam was awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions in Ashau Valley in April, 1968. He has told me that he feels very embarrassed when he is called a “hero”. He feels that he only did what he was trained to do and what would be expected from any officer that day. I will always have a deep residing respect and gratitude for this brave, dedicated and self-effacing man who saved the lives of my friends.

    Was he a “hero”? Yes, not because of the medal he was awarded but because he did his job that day. I feel that every combat medic, every man who volunteered to walk point or moved to a more exposed position under fire in the hope of getting a shot at the enemy is a hero. Some got medals for bravery but most didn’t but that doesn’t mean that their actions were any less heroic. All were doing their jobs, what they were trained to do and expected to do in the face of the normal human reaction for self preservation.

    I’m not sure if you could even design a sliding scale for what actions were more or less heroic in wartime. You either overcame your fear and did your job or you didn’t. Who deserved to be singled out for doing a “heroic action” was most often decided by the other un-sung heroes who were there when the action took place. So who is or what makes someone a war hero? The best answer I have ever heard has been said by countless veterans from many wars; the men and women who didn’t make it home alive are the real heroes. The only medal most of these heroes received was far less than they deserved, the Purple Heart.

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  • Rose Request -- Chris Zeigler, Thu, February 24 2005, 10:49:17 (64.9.52.126)
    Would you please be able to put a rose beside:
    KLINE,DAVID SAMUEL SSG E6 A 19480306 19691120
    LANDISBURG, PA Wall Location: 16W 100
    in remembrance/support of all veterens past and present!

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  • Concerning this Board -- Pat (Beanie) Camunes, Tue, February 15 2005, 9:08:30 (66.25.88.75)
    Something I’d like to remind those that participate on this board are a couple of things that are listed on our rules and guidelines for posting. The present war in Iraq, Sumatra and Government issues, especially those affecting all veterans are all good topics and very interesting. What we have to keep in mind that this site was created for Vietvets, friends and family and now listed as one of the top sites on the Internet for Vietnam Student Research.

    Different topics are fine if the post is kept to a minimum. Replies don’t seem to affect much but long posts tend to push allot of the student research information into the archives. Many don’t even realize that archives exist or how to get to them. (Top right hand side of the board) The last group that was here, the Pembroke Academy got this link from the PBS site. I’m glad to see our present educators allowing their students to actively participate with those of us that were THERE and not depend on what the media and history books portray. I imagine that “truthfulness” that can be proven by our ban in China!

    I thank all of the regulars and newcomers for their participation, honesty and for those that were there, a Welcome Home. I look forward to seeing this site remain listed as one of the “best” on the Internet and it can’t be done without your participation. Thank you all and God Bless. . . . Beanie

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  • Re: WORLD WAR II HEROS -- Sierra, Thu, February 17 2005, 8:54:45 (216.186.26.2)
    I need a hero of world war two and their accomplishments for a school presentation

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  • poetry -- julie welch, Thu, February 17 2005, 12:09:50 (64.12.116.137)
    first of my respect and honor to all who have had to served us. id like permission to put a poem on line,about vietnam,i write poetry and it will be being published in a book in the near furture,but that is not why i want to put it here, as my father was a part of the invasion of france,in ww11 and im a proud daughter of a man who served with the f.s.s.f. please let me know if i,am allowed to do so , as right now my dearest friend is in iraq, and my cousions name lays on the great wall. thank you,much respect and pride to all. julie.

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  • Thoughts on the Iraqi election. -- Larry Lusk, Tue, February 08 2005, 23:35:42 (66.214.61.187)
    I have made my feelings very clear about how big a mistake I think it was for us to invade Iraq. I have also tried to indicate (and done a poor job at it) that the type of micro management of the war that our Administration has used is so similar to the way things were managed in Vietnam that it seems like they got hold of an old script. In both wars this has cost both lives and lost opportunities. At least the elder Bush let his commanders in the field run the war and did everything he could to get our men what they needed. Politics still played a big role at the end but that’s just the way it always seems to go.

    That said let no one mistake that I am 100% behind our troops. I know what it is to be a grunt in the field. Any time I hear or read anything that might make their job harder or more dangerous I will come to their defense every time and in this sense Generals (and the C in C) be damned. They are not the ones who are out risking their lives every second of every day. For this reason I want our troops to get out of an area or situation of unreasonable danger as soon as possible. This is the reason I hope that the Iraqi election succeeds and brings at least some stability to that place of unreasonable danger. If there is a choice between Democracy in Iraq and the safety of our troops I will pick our troops every time. I think Democracy is a great thing and if we can have both then I’m all for it. But if our Administration and our General Staff have misjudged things again and as a result we continue to lose troops in a (then) hopeless effort you have yet to see me really angry.

    Thus I hope with all my heart that this election accomplishes at least most of what it is hoped to accomplish. If it doesn’t then to save face our President will keep on trying to “win” even when a fool can see that you gave it your best shot and no matter how much you want it to be different, what you want to happen just isn’t going to in this time and place. Our troops will continue to follow the orders of their C in C because that is the oath they swore and is their duty and obligation. And they will continue to die as a result.

    You could say that this is “defeatist thinking” but I ask you, no matter how just the cause or how noble the reason, how many lives is that ideal of Democracy worth if it isn’t going to happen. Vietnam should have taught us that you can win all the battles but still lose the war. Should, despite all our efforts, in the months ahead the situation not improve in Iraq we should pull out and save what we can. Our honored dead will be no less the hero’s they already are and the ideal they fought for will still shine as bright as ever. There will be other times and other places for us to make our stand. If this is what we are forced to do then we should do it with the understanding that the reason for failure has nothing to do with the skill and dedication of our Armed Services or the goal they were trying to help the Iraqi’s to attain. It will lie in the poor planning by our leaders and the complicated religious politics of that part of the world.

    Mark my words, we will need that skill and dedication in the years to come. Our world has become in some ways a more dangerous place than it was during “our” time during the Cold War. Let us hope that if Iraq is not the “right time and place” that we will see this and give our fighting men and women the chance to regroup and renew before we are forced to pick a place for a new “stand”. Iraq is just one battle in a much larger struggle. If North Vietnam could lose every battle but still win then if it is necessary we can “lose” this single battle and still be as strong or stronger when it is time for our next battle. I’m not sure who if indeed anyone can be credited with saying this but if you plan for all contingencies then you will never be left without a plan.

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  • Trying to contact -- Bill Hartley, Thu, February 10 2005, 20:16:34 (139.55.10.138)
    I am trying to locate a friend that I had in Bien Hoa in 1967. I know he lives in Oregeon and that he is a member of VSPA. My e-mail will not allow me to send e-mails to VSPA. If anybody out there knows Sebastian Coco please forward my e-mail address to him. Bill Hartley Bien Hoa 66-67 e-mail pjh123@alltel.net
    Thanks.

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  • Re: ANYONE WILLING TO TALK TO ME?? -- Dan Armenta, Sat, January 29 2005, 21:42:09 (67.23.65.56)
    I started a Hawk locator website. Please visit.
    http://danny-boy.us/usmchawk-laam.htm

    My e-mail address is barbaradan@adelphia.net

    Semper Fi!
    Dan

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  • Re: My dad thinks he has a vietnamese-american child -- mindy le, Sat, February 05 2005, 22:54:01 (4.228.192.99)
    I am Amerasian from Vietnam. I am looking for my dad.It sounds like my dad. Could I contact you to get a more information about him.Please email me back asap. I got a feeling as he is my Dad too. I am crying right now because I am so excited.

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  • Virtual Wall -- Joe, Wed, February 02 2005, 13:10:00 (65.43.184.1)
    You students should go visit the Virtual Wall. You'll find that a large percent of these lost lives have never been remembered, The only life they had, wasted in some foreign land half a world away and nobody bothers to even spend one minute to remember them. The Marines at that site seem especially forgotten. A group that suffered the highest casualty rate in Vietnam. It was the only life they had to offer, we can offer a few minutes to offer their memory something can't we?

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  • How They Really Feel -- Ed Stanton, Thu, January 27 2005, 6:32:39 (67.127.197.29)
    It has been three weeks since my ship, the USS Abraham Lincoln, arrived off the Sumatran coast to aid the hundreds of thousands of victims of the Dec. 26 tsunami that ravaged their coastline. I’d like to say that this has been a rewarding experience for us, but it has not: Instead, it has been a frustrating and needlessly dangerous exercise made even more difficult by the Indonesian government and a traveling circus of so-called aid workers who have invaded our spaces.

    What really irritated me was a scene I witnessed in the Lincoln’s wardroom a few days ago. I went in for breakfast as I usually do, expecting to see the usual crowd of ship’s company officers in khakis and air wing aviators in flight suits, drinking coffee and exchanging rumors about when our ongoing humanitarian mission in Sumatra is going to end.

    What I saw instead was a mob of civilians sitting around like they owned the place. They wore various colored vests with logos on the back including Save The Children, World Health Organization and the dreaded baby blue vest of the United Nations. Mixed in with this crowd were a bunch of reporters, cameramen and Indonesian military officers in uniform. They all carried cameras, sunglasses and fanny packs like tourists on their way to Disneyland.

    My warship had been transformed into a floating hotel for a bunch of trifling do-gooders overnight.

    As I went through the breakfast line, I overheard one of the U.N. strap-hangers, a longhaired guy with a beard, make a sarcastic comment to one of our food servers. He said something along the lines of “Nice china, really makes me feel special,” in reference to the fact that we were eating off of paper plates that day. It was all I could do to keep from jerking him off his feet and choking him, because I knew that the reason we were eating off paper plates was to save dishwashing water so that we would have more water to send ashore and save lives. That plus the fact that he had no business being there in the first place.

    My attitude towards these unwanted no-loads grew steadily worse that day as I learned more from one of our junior officers who was assigned to escort a group of them. It turns out that they had come to Indonesia to “assess the damage” from the Dec. 26 tsunami.

    Well, they could have turned on any TV in the world and seen that the damage was total devastation. When they got to Sumatra with no plan, no logistics support and no five-star hotels to stay in, they threw themselves on the mercy of the U.S. Navy, which, unfortunately, took them in. I guess our senior brass was hoping for some good PR since this was about the time that the U.N. was calling the United States “stingy” with our relief donations.

    As a result of having to host these people, our severely over-tasked SH-60 Seahawk helos, which were carrying tons of food and water every day to the most inaccessible places in and around Banda Aceh, are now used in great part to ferry these “relief workers” from place to place every day and bring them back to their guest bedrooms on the Lincoln at night. Despite their avowed dedication to helping the victims, these relief workers will not spend the night in-country, and have made us their guardians by default.

    When our wardroom treasurer approached the leader of the relief group and asked him who was paying the mess bill for all the meals they ate, the fellow replied, “We aren’t paying, you can try to bill the U.N. if you want to.”

    In addition to the relief workers, we routinely get tasked with hauling around reporters and various low-level “VIPs,” which further wastes valuable helo lift that could be used to carry supplies. We had to dedicate two helos and a C-2 cargo plane for America-hater Dan Rather and his entourage of door holders and briefcase carriers from CBS News. Another camera crew was from MTV. I doubt if we’ll get any good PR from them, since the cable channel is banned in Muslim countries. We also had to dedicate a helo and crew to fly around the vice mayor of Phoenix, Ariz., one day. Everyone wants in on the action.

    As for the Indonesian officers, while their job is apparently to encourage our leaving as soon as possible, all they seem to do in the meantime is smoke cigarettes. They want our money and our help but they don’t want their population to see that Americans are doing far more for them in two weeks than their own government has ever done or will ever do for them.

    To add a kick in the face to the USA and the Lincoln, the Indonesian government announced it would not allow us to use their airspace for routine training and flight proficiency operations while we are saving the lives of their people, some of whom are wearing Osama bin Ladin T-shirts as they grab at our food and water. The ship has to steam out into international waters to launch and recover jets, which makes our helos have to fly longer distances and burn more fuel.

    What is even worse than trying to help people who totally reject everything we stand for is that our combat readiness has suffered for it.

    An aircraft carrier is an instrument of national policy and the big stick she carries is her air wing. An air wing has a set of very demanding skills and they are highly perishable. We train hard every day at sea to conduct actual air strikes, air defense, maritime surveillance, close air support and many other missions – not to mention taking off and landing on a ship at sea.

    Our safety regulations state that if a pilot does not get a night carrier landing every seven days, he has to be re-qualified to land on the ship. Today we have pilots who have now been over 25 days without a trap due to being unable to use Indonesian airspace to train. Normally it is when we are at sea that our readiness is at its very peak. Thanks to the Indonesian government, we have to waive our own safety rules just to get our pilots off the deck.

    In other words, the longer we stay here helping these people, the more dangerous it gets for us to operate. We have already lost one helicopter, which crashed in Banda Aceh while taking sailors ashore to unload supplies from the C-130s. There were no relief workers on that one.

    I’m all for helping the less fortunate, but it is time to give this mission to somebody other than the U.S. Navy. Our ship was supposed to be home on Feb. 3 and now we have no idea how long we will be here. American taxpayers are spending millions per day to keep this ship at sea and getting no training value out of it. As a result, we will come home in a lower state of readiness than when we left due to the lack of flying while supporting the tsunami relief effort.

    I hope we get some good PR in the Muslim world out of it. After all, this is Americans saving the lives of Muslims. I have my doubts.

    [Ed Stanton is the pen name of a career U.S. Navy officer currently serving with the USS Abraham Lincoln carrier strike group.]

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  • William (Billy) Emmans, SP4 -- Ginny, Fri, January 28 2005, 10:39:25 (152.163.100.137)
    Wondering if anyone knew my brother-in-law, Billy Emmans, who served in the 1/92 Bn.???

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  • Da Nang 69-70 -- Patrick G. Brannon, Thu, January 27 2005, 7:22:03 (65.19.195.86)
    I would like to hear from individuals that were in Comm Co. H & S Bn 1 FSR FLC Prov Rifle PLT during 69-70. Headquarters and Service Bn (-) (Rein) 1st FSR FLC Da Nang. This was changed later to 1st CAG, III MAF. The only names I remember are Gunny Hawkins, Al Schmidt, and D. Huffman from Danville, Il, a guy named (I think)Dietreck. I know its been a few years (36) but, would like to hear from you.

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  • anyone remember a battle -- charlie skuhr, Wed, January 26 2005, 9:31:42 (64.12.116.66)
    28 Sept. 1967, Co.B 1st Bn, 27th inv got into battle with NVA - looking for details of what happened.

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  • A question for the Redlegs -- Larry Lusk, Thu, January 20 2005, 16:42:14 (66.214.61.174)
    As I mentioned in discussion on an earlier post, the Army in Vietnam normally used a set SOP when a unit asked for artillery fire support. It consisted of a smoke round first followed by a WP round before any HE rounds were fired. This allowed the unit or the FO to make corrections before a “fire for effect” was given (I believe that if requested HE could be called for directly). The Army fire control coordinator also would tell us if the fire support we were going to get was heavier than 105mm. Did the Marines have a similar SOP for close fire support? Also, does anyone know how the Navy handled artillery fire support? Was the proceedure handled differently if the requesting unit or FO was from a differnt branch of the service? There were times when we and I would guess other units had to depend on support from a different service because they were out of communication range or for other reasons unable to contact their normal fire support center.

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  • memories -- benbradley, Thu, January 20 2005, 8:24:33 (24.62.241.203)
    I injoyed reading this artical because its like after being with those guys for so long they become your family. To see a friend die tring to protect you must be hart breaking. Must feel lonly after sometime and hope to suvive to see tomorrow. Many people dont relize the full effect of what the soildier went through.

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  • I read 'Forgiveness...Dust off' -- Nina A., Wed, January 19 2005, 22:03:30 (205.188.116.66)
    Wow. People often overlook the men who had to retrieve the wounded from the battle fields. To hear that you guys hardly had any rest at all. The only rest being if there were no other choppers. You guys are true heros too. I really appreciated reading about your experiance. Thank you for sharing it with all of us.

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  • My Enemy! By: Pat Camunes -- Leslie, Wed, January 19 2005, 17:32:33 (205.188.116.66)
    I really liked this story because it was from a different perspective which made it more interesting. I loved the line at the end which said "It is as if i looked into my own eyes as if standing over my trophies of my enemy dead," i thought that was good. I also thought the line "I could share the loneliness they felt, being away from their families, and in a way, regretted the suffering i would try to inflict upon them." was good. you said when the first clamore blew towards your squad that you were all stunned, blinded and dazed i wounder if there was anything else going through you mind while that was happening? I just wanted to say i thought it was a really good war story.

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  • "Red sky at night, Sailor's delight..Red sky at morning..Sailors take warning" by Michael Gillen -- Leslie, Wed, January 19 2005, 17:22:30 (205.188.116.66)
    First of all i like the title, it fits the story and thats what caught my eye while looking up war storys. i have a question for the author, you said "I had no idea what i was getting into, and it didnt matter" i was woundering if at that moment you had any fear of what you were getting yourself into? it must of been scary, and at the age of only 21 i know i would have been scared.

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  • ONCE UPON A SUNNY AFTERNOON By: Lonnie Dotson -- Leslie, Wed, January 19 2005, 17:12:48 (205.188.116.66)
    i read this story for an assignment, and i thought it was really interesting because other war storys are about bad things that happen. something good hardly ever happens in war storys, but this one was different. When i read about the hole and throwing a granade into it i thought it was a lot smarter then actually going into the whole like in other storys. One question i did have was were you really going to use to build an orphanage, or give it back to the people and not the government? If so wouldent you want to keep a little for yourself? You also said you could actually smell the ememy through the hole, my question is how? you might think these questions are stupid but i just wanted to know.

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  • Because I fly -- becky, Wed, January 19 2005, 15:49:26 (24.118.123.242)
    I liked this story. I liked how the man in this story said that he can't call other people ugly anymore, right after he got burned. I wanted to know if the author, Dick Sheffield knew this man personaly. Or else, how did he know him?

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  • Rain -- becky, Wed, January 19 2005, 15:16:28 (24.118.123.242)
    This story was very well written. I like how simple sentences were used in order to capture emotion and feeling. I'd like to ask the author, Michael E. Duncan, exactly how he felt when he killed that man he was talking about in the story, if possible.

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  • Red Cross Girls -- Lauren M., Wed, January 19 2005, 9:46:01 (204.169.114.69)
    Even though the subject of this writing was semi-disturbing, it was presented in such a way that i could not help but laugh. I find it fascinating when analysing how of all things to remember, most people choose to remember the more amusing and "good" aspects of things, and i feel it was effective in this way. I suppose it also relays an important message: don't sleep with prostitutes, and if you do- avoid attractive red cross girls. It was nice to read something of a lighter nature on this site, it was refreshing.

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  • Response to: "Warrior's Last Prayer" -- Joe R, Wed, January 19 2005, 9:41:24 (204.169.114.69)
    This is a very deep touching poem. It shows that even with all the comotion going on people don't seem to think much about their life outiside of war and who it affects them. It shows that even though people have different beliefs and fight for there own country, People are still afraid of death the same way. It also shows that peopple are different but a lot of eople are the same in the fact that they have families that would be hurt if anything were to happen to them.

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  • The Toast by Brandt Wade -- Lauren M., Wed, January 19 2005, 9:39:44 (204.169.114.69)
    I read "The Toast" by Brandt Wade, and i found it very touching. Most of the stories told are concerning facts, more than personal beliefs. This writing was more about how the war affected those who came back, and how many opted to repress the events of the war, which caused many of them to remember evernts tragically. It is hard to read how things were for the many men and women who fought and died in the war, and i really appreciate the writing done by those who lived through it.

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  • 'MINES!' Was the story i read. -- Nina A., Wed, January 19 2005, 9:09:41 (204.169.114.69)
    The way the author, William Dean, wrote his experiance really helped me to visualize the events. I know that no one could possibaly know or even come close to understand the hardships that he went through. My question for Mr. Dean is, how long did you have to serve there? I assume that you got to go home after. Have you gained sight in your left eye now? I'm so increadilby proud of you and all the others who served in the war. God bless you in all you do.

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  • Response to: Tay Hinh Province -- Joe R, Wed, January 19 2005, 8:57:05 (204.169.114.69)
    This story is intresting because it shows how unecpected war is. You could just be walking on a normal day then there are explosions and gun fire in a matter of seconds.It also helps to see the other pespective of the war from the point of view of the Viet Cong. It also helps realize death and what it may have been like dieing on the battle field.

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  • Response to "Tay Ninh Province" -- Jessica G., Wed, January 19 2005, 8:55:48 (204.169.114.69)
    I choose to read the "Tay Ninh Province" war story. It was a very descriptive story. The author was very patriotic and made me proud to be in the same country as such a great patriotic man. The author was very brave to accept the Vietcong gruo9p alliance at such a young age. The author represents our country very well and symbolizes a great strong willed man. The author is a very honest and nice man to feel for the enemy. I could believe that most people feel no pitty for the enemy side during war,but he felt for them. This makes the author a great hero in all that he has thought and done.

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  • Sky Palace -- Katy von Fange, Tue, January 18 2005, 20:21:12 (24.118.199.103)
    I thought this was a great story! I loved the humor and showing us the other side of the war. Thanks for such a neat and interesting story!

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  • All the Good Things... -- Katy von Fange, Tue, January 18 2005, 20:03:04 (24.118.199.103)
    When I started reading this story, I knew it sounded familiar. Turns out my mom used to read this to me when I was a lot younger and now that I've gotten older, I appreciate the story so much more. What a great story and thanks for sharing this with everyone!

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  • Payback... -- Katy von Fange, Tue, January 18 2005, 19:51:34 (24.118.199.103)
    I just read the story Payback... and I was fascinated with all the details and descriptions of what went on throughout the story. I enjoyed reading it especially because it was from a very different perspective in the Vietnam war, being a wounded soldier. Thanks for a great story!

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  • The Response to "Sail Away. Home." -- Jessica G., Tue, January 18 2005, 10:08:03 (204.169.114.69)
    I read the story, "Sail Away, Home" it was a great story. There is so much detail. When i was reading it I kept wanting to read faster and faster so i can find out what happened next. That must have been a horrible night though, one that you may never forget. Try to be glad that you fought hard and did everything you could to survive. The author had a great craft of writting and made me believe that I was in the story with him because I could imagine it so well.
    Sincerely Jessica

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  • Response to "All the Good Times" -- Jessica G., Tue, January 18 2005, 10:01:46 (204.169.114.69)
    The story I read titled, "All the Good Times," was very inspirational to me. It is a sad story with a very bittersweet ending. I think that it is great that you touched the lives of so many people. With touching the lives of everyone you also made them feel good about themselves. I understand that you were a teacher so you taught children math, yet you taught them a more valuable lesson having them learn how much people love them. Kids do not realize how special and unique that they are and I believe that if kid all around the world would do this assignment, they would feel better about themselves and also appricaiate living life more.
    PLease write back Jessica

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  • Response to: King Rat -- Joe R, Tue, January 18 2005, 9:57:16 (204.169.114.69)
    The story King Rat helps me to realize the mental side of Vietnam. I couldnt even imagine sitting in the dark all night long, not being able to talk to anyone, but still hearing so many noises from the surrounding area. Many people focus mainly on the physical anguish and dont really see how much of a mental strain it is. It must have been hard for all of the vetrans and I want to thank them for risking there lives so that we could live better now.

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  • dog soldiers...my reaction -- Renee Ritter, Tue, January 18 2005, 9:54:49 (204.169.115.103)
    Its really sad to read this poem. to think all the bad things that happened to the soldiers and the dogs. in a good way the dogs were there for confort, a friend. i wonder if the dogs ever had any mental problems when they came back home. i am sorry for all who have lost i know how you feel.

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  • Welcome Home, Soldier-1968 -- Amanda Olivier, Fri, January 14 2005, 11:11:17 (24.62.241.203)
    Dear, Ed My name is Amanda Olivier. I attend Pembroke Academy in Pembroke, NH. I have read your story Welcome Home, Soilder-1968. I think that it does not make any sense to me as to why you cant buy a beer if you are under 21 but you can go and fight in combat at the age of 18. I completely understand where you were coming from. So Thank you for going into combat and being so brave i appreciate it! Sincerely,
    Amanda Olivier

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  • Walking Dead: New guy Dead guy -- Amanda Olivier, Fri, January 14 2005, 12:43:53 (24.62.241.203)
    Dear, Don My name is Amanda Olivier I attend Pembroke Academy in Pembroke. NH. I too think that, that is a little messed up that a guy would be excited in seeing his first dead body. It is also a little ironic that he would be his own first dead body. Thank you so much for your bravery in the war. Sincerely,
    Amanda Olivier

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  • Charlie -- Amanda Olivier, Fri, January 14 2005, 12:05:00 (24.62.241.203)
    Dear, Nik My name is Amanda Olivier. I attend Pembroke Academy, in Pembroke NH. I have just finished reading your story called Charlie. I can completely understand why he would be so upset; it is a traumatic thing killing someone. But you are right she was the enemy, she was trying to kill him so he did the right thing. Thank you for all of your bravery in the war! Sincerely,
    Amanda Olivier

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  • Thanksgiving! -- Amanda Olivier, Fri, January 14 2005, 11:49:16 (24.62.241.203)
    Dear, Patrick I think it is great that there where people there that actually risked their lives so that they could give you a real meal for Thanksgiving. I am very grateful for all your bravery in the war. Thank you very much!
    Sincerely,
    Amanda Olivier

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  • last prayer -- John Tetlow, Fri, January 14 2005, 11:19:05 (24.62.241.203)
    Hello again Don, This is John from Pembroke Academy. I have read a couple of your stories but, I find this one to be your best work of all because it sybolises that although a solider has died and has gone to heven God tells him he will not be forgotten. Though he has died in a world of hate and his friends and family dying for their country. For all he had sacrificed he will now live in peace and harmony forever. and everyone he has lost in earth he will now be with forever.
    respectfully,
    John Tetlow

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  • Heavens veil -- John Tetlow, Fri, January 14 2005, 11:12:20 (24.62.241.203)
    hello Don, my name is John Tetlow and i attend Pembroke Academy in New Hampshire. I read your short story on the Heavens veil and I think that it must have been a very small piece of tranquaility in the mist of such a dangerous and scary time. I almost know how that feels because one time I when things were going wrong I found this little pond and I got really relaxed and inspired and although I was going through a hard time there was still a place I could have peace and serenity. Thank you for that enjoyable story.
    respectfully,
    John Tetlow

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  • Tet -- John Tetlow, Fri, January 14 2005, 10:58:03 (24.62.241.203)
    dear Den, My name is John Tetlow. I am a student at Pembroke Academy high school in New Hampshire and I am responding to your story on the Tet offensive 1968. I just wanted to say that I couldn't even imagine what it must have been like seeing two men running towards you not knowing who they were or what they wanted. Knowing that there are enemy soldiers were somewhere around you. I think you did a good thing not shooting them, Although you think two names have been cheated from the wall. I know they will be forever greatful.
    respectfully,
    John Tetlow

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  • Camoflage! -- Amanda Olivier, Fri, January 14 2005, 10:51:42 (24.62.241.203)
    Dear, Billy my name is Amanda Olivier. I attend Pembroke Academy in Pembroke, NH. I am responding to your article, Camouflage! I think that it really great that you guys could still try and joke around, giving the circumstances. I admire all of your bravery for going into combat. Thank you so much!
    Sincerely,
    Amanda Olivier

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  • i reguard to brother, brother -- Ryan E., Fri, January 14 2005, 9:41:58 (24.62.241.203)
    Dear Mr. Thomas Utts,
    I appreciate the story you wrote about, it gave me a better sense of what war was like between families. I just wanted to say thank you for the story and good luck to you and yours.

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  • I reguard to shoot a dog -- Ryan E., Fri, January 14 2005, 9:37:48 (24.62.241.203)
    Dear Mr. Ernest Govea,

    I’m sorry to hear about what happened to your on your job, I’m cannot imagine what it would have been like to have to kill an innocent dog, I had a hard time even reading it, I hope the best for you and yours thank you for your story.

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  • The no longer forgotten war -- John Tetlow, Fri, January 14 2005, 7:50:42 (24.62.241.203)
    hello Don,My name is John Tetlow and I go to Pembroke Academy high school in Pembroke, NH and i'm responding to your story of when you visited the Korean memorial. Before I took this english class I didn't know much of anything on the Korean war or the Vietnam war but after learning more and reading your story I realized that you soliders went into a war you knew nothing about but you still went because you knew your country was in danger. I thank you for your contribution and sacrifices and I no longer consider The Korean The forgotten war.
    respectfully,
    John Tetlow

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  • Complements on site -- Matthew C. Robichaud, Fri, January 14 2005, 7:34:01 (24.62.241.203)
    I enjoyed reading all stories. I feel that the site should be read by all. I will not forget what i have read and i will incurage others to view the site. Thank You for a great website.

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  • All Along . . . -- Matthew C. Robichaud, Fri, January 14 2005, 7:30:34 (24.62.241.203)
    I enjoyed your story. I have a feeling of what its like to watch someone die. I can't imagine watching helicopters filled with soldiers just blowing up in mid air. As if the fighting on the ground is not enough, to see the helicopters blow up must have made you feel like their was just no getting out of Vietnam. Especially, not alive.

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  • American Warriors -- Matthew C. Robichaud, Fri, January 14 2005, 7:19:18 (24.62.241.203)
    Its great that so many Native Americans fought for us and died for us. We took there lnd from them to make this country. I feel its great that they are willing to fight for the USA.

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  • They served too -- Richard dyer, Thu, January 13 2005, 5:02:28 (24.62.241.203)
    I am writing in response too the story "They Served Too." I am a junior at Pemboke Academy in Pembroke NH. In my junior english class we are studying the Vietnam War and as a project we must read five stories related to the topic. This story makes a really good point. The soldiers weren't the only ones who served there were countless others who in some way either had an effect or were affected by the war. Even years later this women was still affected just by the sound of the hospital's helicopter touching down. It showed the long term effects of what happened during that time. I have respect and honor for all those who have ever served and that will serve again and i just want everyone to know that i wont forget anyone who served.

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  • Lucky Lucky -- Matthew C. Robichaud, Thu, January 13 2005, 19:59:34 (24.34.70.142)
    I read the story lucky lucky. It give me a feeling that makes me wanna join a branch. The fact that he cared enough to put himslef in danger befor his men. That i belive is a true leader. And i am happy you survived to tell the story.

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  • I have been reading some stories. -- Matthew C. Robichaud, Thu, January 13 2005, 19:51:50 (24.34.70.142)
    I found that even in a hard time, the men of nam could still find humor in the feild. I read Camouflage. I belive that humor like that help the men through a day out in the feild. I have great respect for all who fight and die for my country and my fredom.

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  • Gloria Redlin Shot To Death June 8, 1969 Pleiku -- George Slook, Thu, January 13 2005, 11:02:50 (66.208.231.54)
    Looking for information with regard to Gloria Redlin, a Catholic Relief Services worker shot to death in Pleiku 1969

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  • Forget-me-not -- Chelsea, Thu, January 13 2005, 16:20:54 (24.62.149.83)
    this peom has so much meaning these men and women who fought for us for korea, vietnam, and Iraq will never be forget we will remember them everyday not just on the day given for them but everyday. For some people it just sem like we only remember the vet on vet day but it more then that we remember them everyday.

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  • Khe Sanh... bloodiest war in vietnam! -- Chelsea, Thu, January 13 2005, 16:12:19 (24.62.149.83)
    hey my name is chelsea patten and i got to pembroke academy. right know in my english class we are learning about vietnam vet. we are reading tim o'brain "the Thing They Carried." and it just not about what they carried but what something we like. like how he felt when he frist killed a man. i enjoyed your story very much. it was filled with detailes and very long i read every page. having to fly place to to place just so you can get into Khe sanh it took a while but you finally got there. see i am not that big on wars but i love to hear the stories but it touch you in the stranges way.

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  • Khe Sanh... Last Man out turn off the lights! -- Chelsea, Thu, January 13 2005, 16:04:12 (24.62.149.83)
    hi my is Chelsea Patten and i go to Pembroke Academy. In english class we are currently learn about vietnem vet. i like your story but it was too short i was hopping for somthing longer and more detallied

    chelsea Patten

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  • Dad...I'll meet you at the wall -- Chelsea, Thu, January 13 2005, 15:57:25 (24.62.149.83)
    Hi my name is Chelsea patten and i go to Pembroke Academy. In my english, taught by Mr. Morris,we are currently learning about the Vietnam and how vet were treated when they got home. but we never really taked about how family felt or effect when a family memeber passed away in the war. I was touch by this story because it was a journry that you didnt have to take but you took it because you wanted to know about your farther and what good he did during the war. well i hope that you did stay in touch with your father friend.

    chelsea patten

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  • The phone call -- Adam David, Thu, January 13 2005, 5:48:16 (24.62.241.203)
    I read your story on the phone call and i found your story very amusing. Everybody in the hospital laughed at him because they suffered injuries in the war bye getting shot or being blown up. This guy made it through all of that and when he thought he was home free, without a scratch on his body. He heading to the plane with excitement that he will be seeing his family soon. He gets hit by a jeep. If I was there I would of shite myself. I only have one question, did he suffer and life threatning injuries after be hit by the jeep. You can email me back through my teacher jim morris at jmorris@sau53.org. Stay in touch.

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  • A beautiful story -- Richard Dyer, Thu, January 13 2005, 5:14:57 (24.62.241.203)
    Iam writing in response to your story "Memories of a Wounded Corpsman". This story is beautiful in its presence and is deeply filled with strong emotion. The man who wrote shows true feeling in his remorse for his friend who fell during a battle in Vietnam. The story is written in poem form and makes for a nullifying experience as you read.

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  • comments -- Richard Dyer, Thu, January 13 2005, 4:49:28 (24.62.241.203)
    Hello my Name is Richard Dyer and i am writing to you in response to the story "Night Convoy Long Binh to Binh Hao".
    I am a junior at Pembroke Academy in Pembroke NH. We are currently studying the Vietnam conflict nd reading Tim O' Brian's "The Things They Carried". In our project we must read five combat stories and write thoughtful responses to them. The soldier who wrote this story expressed his entire thought process during his ordeal very well. What he wrote almost made me feel as though i were sitting in the seat next to him. The fear word rhetoric used very well and made me have more repect for the sacrifices that you guys made for us even though not everyone else thouht so at the time. If you would to contact me feel free my email is exrotcmaple@yahoo.com
    Richardn Dyer

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  • Words From Above -- Scott J., Wed, January 12 2005, 20:02:34 (24.62.145.133)
    If I were there in Captain Prince place, I would have reacted and by the time, "Stay still", was said, I would have been dead. I am also glad he stayed lying down not moving. There are alot of close encounters in war. Sometimes those close encounters aren't close but direct hits on a people. Sincerely, Scott

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  • "Red Sky at Night, Sailor’s delight... Red sky at morning... Sailors take warning!" -- Scott J., Wed, January 12 2005, 19:34:45 (24.62.145.133)
    Some parts of War maybe boring, but as long as you have something to entertain you, like a book, then you would be fine. Doing something like bringing more ammunition to the U.S. soldiers is just as important as the next person. If those people didn't bring ammunition, U.S. troops wouldn't of lasted as long as they did in all the wars, or win for that matter. My heart goes out to all the soldiers who have served, and are serving. sincerely, Scott

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  • Responding to The Phone Call -- Scott J., Wed, January 12 2005, 17:33:23 (24.62.145.133)
    let me begin by saying that I found The Phone Call a little humorous. when everyone was trying to go to sleep, heard the phone conversation, a vet calling his sister. He was just about to go on a plane home, he was hit by a car. everyone started laughing. sure it's humorous. and for days whenever you heard, "Hit by a jeep" you would laugh, if you were at the military hospital where this conversation took place. i am happy to hear that even injured vets could laugh about something. Sincerely, Scott

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  • In Response to Camouflage! -- Scott J., Wed, January 12 2005, 17:15:00 (24.62.145.133)
    After i read, Camouflage, i laughed. Even in the deepness of Vietnam, it's always nice to know that some soldiers are able to have a sence of humor to lighten things. Especially when your using a leaf. Sincerely, Scott

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  • Response to The Rain by: Michael E. Duncan -- Scott J., Wed, January 12 2005, 16:52:25 (24.62.145.133)
    i liked The Rain. it was very descriptive about Vietnam. it told how it was. it gave me a better understanding of how vietnam was, and that some part of that war calls back to you. i can imagine some of the horrors by reading this.
    sincerely, Scott

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  • Everyone! -- Dani, Wed, January 12 2005, 16:35:21 (24.61.161.223)
    I think that Wildred Own's poems, really show all the emtions that were running through his head, and how he was dealing with it all. I found a lot of his poems, inspiring, and very well-written.

    *Dani*

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  • coffee time -- ben couture, Wed, January 12 2005, 16:09:19 (4.233.161.16)
    i agree id much rather hear about the good times and the fun the soliders had in nam rather than the bad so if you have anymore and would like share them you can email me at jmorris@sau53.org

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  • Veitnam Vets -- Brittani Palmer, Wed, January 12 2005, 15:44:35 (65.175.205.132)
    I am a proud american and that I hope that all the men and women of the Veitnam war and the all the wars leading up to know are ok, and are safe. I don't know why people judge you by the way you act or the way you dress. You are an american and you deserve the right to be your self

    Sincerly,
    Brittani Palmer

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  • PARTY ON!! -- ben couture, Wed, January 12 2005, 15:14:57 (4.233.161.16)
    i am writing in response to "party on!" Even over in vietnam you guys could put together a party like that,it must have been one wild time. I dont know anyone here in the states that could have put together a better party than that, and for that i commend you


    ben

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  • new year, all along the watchtower -- ben couture, Wed, January 12 2005, 14:57:13 (4.233.161.16)
    id like to thank forrest brandt for writing this story and for showing that in all of the shit that went down in that place and how bad it got at some times that they still had time to play jokes on people and have a little fun.

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  • This was my best, that day -- Chris, Wed, January 12 2005, 13:45:18 (205.188.116.66)
    After reading this poem I think I can slightly visualize what our vets went through. It saddened me to realize that many vets had their friends die in their arms. And knowing that they went through makes me respect them more than anyone else.

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  • Response to They Served Too! -- C. Sevigny, Wed, January 12 2005, 12:57:35 (205.188.116.66)
    I agree that women Vietnam veterans should be honored. I can't even imagine the impact that seeing the condition of some our injured soldiers could have had on their lives. I hope that they realize just how important they really were.

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  • Response to Freedom isn't Free -- C.Sevigny, Wed, January 12 2005, 12:33:28 (205.188.116.66)
    I am a high school student, and I have been juggling thoughts of joining a branch of the military. After reading this I realized that I take my freedom for granted and when I have reached the age to enlist I will join, so that I can defend these freedoms like all soilders have and will do.

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  • Co. C 18th Engr. Bde. 864th Engineer Battalion (Pacemakers) Whiskey Mtn. -- Harold Liefbroer ( LIEF ), Sun, October 24 2004, 22:41:21 (208.54.210.89)
    Trying to locate some old friends from Whiskey Mountain 1970-1971.
    18th Engineer Bde. Company C, 864th Engineer Battalion, (Pacemakers)
    Feel free to contact me. Harold Liefbroer ( LIEF )at cny34000@centurytel.net

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  • 821st combat security police squadron -- ron whitehead, Tue, November 30 2004, 18:12:48 (65.96.245.220)
    was wondering if there was a web site connected with this squadron or operation safeside. thanks in advance if anyone knows one

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  • Response to "vietnam law and stealing" -- Adam David, Wed, January 12 2005, 8:31:25 (24.62.241.203)
    I read your story on the vietnam law and stealing. I'm am not sure if you interpreted the law right, but if you did thats absolutely ridicolous. You were in there country fighting for them and giving them rights that they wouldn't have in a communist government and they have the balls to steal from you. There the reason you were in Vietnam. The law that stated its legal to steal if your not caught while your doing the action. I hope it wasn't such a hassle without the jungle fatigues. I was wondering if the Vietnam law is still in there constitution. You can email me back through my teacher jim morris at jmorris@sau53.org. Hope to here from you soon. LATER!

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  • Dog Soldiers -- Tiffany, Wed, January 12 2005, 7:03:09 (24.62.241.203)
    I thought that this was a very good poem and it helped me understand how some of the soldiers felt during and before the war.

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  • Welcome Home- Soldier -- Brittani Palmer, Tue, January 11 2005, 9:45:49 (24.62.241.203)
    Hello,
    I really liked your story, It really saddens me to see that people were that low to look at you differntly, Its not like you wern't from a different contry or anything. You were a US citizen, Thats something I just do not get it
    Sincerly,
    Brittani Palmer

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  • The Power of a Name -- Tiffany, Tue, January 11 2005, 15:02:11 (65.175.198.172)
    I just finished reading this story and it really ment a lot to me because as I kept reading I realized that I didn't think that a name on a wall could ever really mean anything if I lost my father or grandfather at war but to someone who did lose someone at war it could mean everything just knowing that there name will always be there for them to go see and remember and for people to go and honor.

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  • The Wall of Innocence -- Tiffany, Tue, January 11 2005, 14:44:29 (65.175.198.172)
    After reading this poem I had a better understanding of the pain that the families went threw when there loved ones went to war. This poem made me feel sad for the little girl who would never see her father again and could only look at his name on a wall.

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  • They Served Too! -- Tiffany, Tue, January 11 2005, 14:35:35 (65.175.198.172)
    Hi I just read a story called They Served Too, and would like to thank Dale Summers for writting it because it helped remind me of all the help that nurses gave too during the war. I would also like to thank the nurses for all of there help and efforts.

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  • Welcome Home- Soldier -- Brittani Palmer, Tue, January 11 2005, 9:42:54 (24.62.241.203)
    Hello,
    I really liked your story, It really saddens me to see that people were that low to look at you differntly, Its not like you wern't from a different contry or anything. You were a US citizen, Thats something I just do not get it
    Sincerly,
    Brittani Palmer

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  • Heavy Heart... -- Kayla Lawson, Tue, January 11 2005, 9:39:07 (24.62.241.203)
    Hi my name is kayla and i just read your story. i thought that it was very touching and that it is a god thing to have a heavy heart! it opens new places. sincerley, kayla

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  • At least a good flashback -- Kayla Lawson, Tue, January 11 2005, 9:20:14 (24.62.241.203)
    hello, my name is kayla and i just recently read your story. i am really happy that you have had good flashbacks even though you must have rolled through some emotional break downs and are still carrying emotional baggage upon you. feel free to email me anytime. sincerely, kayla

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  • Warriors threat of death -- Tim La Valley, Tue, January 11 2005, 9:35:12 (24.62.241.203)
    i read the story warriors threat of death and i really enjoyed it because it showed how people joke about it daily and yet they were never faced with it and and probly never will and it also shows what the people of the wars went threw for our country.

    sincerly,
    Tim La Valley

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  • The Phone Call -- Brittani Palmer, Tue, January 11 2005, 9:31:50 (24.62.241.203)
    Hello,
    I hope that all is well. This story sounds like a story i read over the summer Like he got captured and was in jail, which in your case you were not in jail you were in a hospital. Well in the story he helped out the guards bring the wounded to the ER and X-rayed them. Well on with my thoughts on this story, I have a question really, why did everyone laugh at the guy on the telephone I know it was because he really didnt have a HUGE thing happen to him he just had his jeep hit. But, what I was wondering is each in every one of them had different things happen to them but they were all in the war, they all received and injury but still they made fun of him. I think that it is not fair that they got to laugh at him and not themselves.

    Sincerly,
    Brittani Palmer
    **Please don't take offense of this message it is my personal opinion on this topic**

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  • power of a name -- Tim La Valley, Tue, January 11 2005, 9:27:53 (24.62.241.203)
    hey i read the story power of a name and i really like it and i liked how it exxplained how that a name on a wall could mean so much to some people and to others it could mean absolutly nothing

    sincerly, Tim La Valley

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  • Taking a bite out of crime -- Tiffany, Tue, January 11 2005, 9:25:59 (24.62.241.203)
    I really enjoyed reading your story and I would like to thank you for defending our country and still helping out every day.

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  • "Dog Soldiers" -- Ryan DiGiore, Tue, January 11 2005, 9:24:52 (24.62.241.203)
    i learned a lot from this poem called "Dog Soldiers". the things i learned were. i didnt know that dogs helped us fight in the war, that is pretty cool. what kind 0f dogs fought? it would be very interesting to know. Also how many dogs fought and how many lived. it would be cool if you could e-mail me back telling me a little more information so if you would please e-mail me at Jmorris@sau53.org

    thank
    you
    ryan

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  • Donut Dollie Diary -- Brittani Palmer, Tue, January 11 2005, 9:16:20 (24.62.241.203)
    Hello Again,
    As I read all these stories I get a better respect for the vetrans that fought in the war currently and back then. I am not saying that nurses and mp's were not vetrans. Because in my eyes they are and always will be. Susan was an extraordinary woman. She really cared about not just her self but others too. I think that people should care more about each other. I hope this letter brings you smiles not frowns

    Sincerly,
    Brittani

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  • "Dog Soilders" -- Adam David, Tue, January 11 2005, 9:09:45 (24.62.241.203)
    Hi, this is Adam and my class is currently researching the stories of vietnam veterans. I was reading veterans stories about the war when i stubbled upon your inspirational poem about dogs who served in the war. I love all kinds of dogs and your poem really made me think about the war. You can email me back through my teacher Jim Morris at jmorris@sau53.org

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  • Personal story -- Kayla Lawson, Tue, January 11 2005, 8:31:00 (24.62.241.203)
    Hi My name is Kayla and i just read your story and WOW! that was really emotional. it really triggered some thoughts and opinions in my head.i really hope that this message somehow relieved some pressure. you can e-mail me any time. sincerely, kayla

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  • Chu Lai In "I" Corps- 1967 -- Brittani Palmer, Tue, January 11 2005, 8:25:19 (24.62.241.203)
    Hello,
    My name is Brittani Palmer and I am a student from Pembroke Academy and I am very interested in the story that was written. When I read that part where the Mr.Number One of the Battalion told you that you were a proud father of a baby boy. You were very lucky to see your baby boy when he was first born. Some people that are in the war that is going on now in Iraq don't get that opportunity to see their newborns. Which is really sad if you think of it. I truly think that it was both faith and destiny that you were not allowed to be on that patrol at that time. I hope that this letter doesn't bring you harm, but to bring a happy smile on your face to see that us young generation really truly cares.

    Sincerly, Brittani Palmer
    PS- You can write back to me if you would like

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  • "Dog Soilders" -- Adam David, Tue, January 11 2005, 8:23:20 (24.62.241.203)
    Hi, this is Adam and my class is currently researching the stories of vietnam veterans. I was reading veterans stories about the war when i stubbled upon your inspirational poem about dogs who served in the war. I love all kinds of dogs and your poem really made me think about the war. You can email me back through my teacher Jim Morris at jmorris@sau53.org

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  • once more before I die -- Kayla Lawson, Tue, January 11 2005, 8:20:25 (24.62.241.203)
    Hello, My name is Kayla and i just read your story. I have not been in any situation like that before but I see the pain and emotional scarring you had to go through. it must have been really painful. I hope that you seeing this message will help lift some of the emotional baggage in which you have carried upon your shoulders for so long. feel free to e-mail with me if you need to talk.
    sincerely, kayla

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  • Student -- Ryan DiGiore, Tue, January 11 2005, 5:23:04 (24.62.241.203)
    Hi my name is Ryan DiGiore, i was just browsing through your website for a school project that i am required to do. as i was browsing i found a story called "SQUARK!!!". I read this story and it was amazing. I think its pretty cool how you and your 11 air commanders planned attacks/ambushes. finally i hope you will e-mail me back at Jmorris@sau53.org to tell me a little more about this because im really interested.

    Thank you

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  • English Project -- John B, Mon, January 10 2005, 10:09:40 (24.62.241.203)
    Hi my name is John B and my class and I are doing an English project. The project is about Vietnam Veterans and what is was like in the war, and also to reach out to the veterans. I chose your site because it sounded really interesting and it is. When I read that on the two helicopter, it was so amazing how they even got out of there. Also I wasn’t to say “Thank You”. I am so thankful for all those brave soldiers, because if it wasn’t for them this country would be so different. This is one of the best web sites to go to for the Vietnam War.

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  • From the other side -- Billy johnston, Mon, January 10 2005, 9:43:12 (24.62.241.203)
    Hey, Don how are you doing? I just wanted to say that I like how you put your story so everybody can read it after what happened when u came home. Just saying that it is inspirational because you got shit when you came home from the war just saying I admire you because its very courageous of you well ill leave you with this Welcome Home.
    Sincerly,

    Billy

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  • A school project on Vietnam Veterans -- Danielle, Mon, January 10 2005, 9:26:51 (24.62.241.203)
    Hi. My name is Danielle and I'm currently doing a project, dealing with Vietnam Veterans. I think it was very brave of everyone that was in any of the wars, and how they defended our country, even being aware that they may not make it home, when it was all over. Now, thats bravery to me. I'm not able myself to be in the military at this point in time, but maybe someday I can be a nurse, and help injured soldiers..anyways thank you for your time.

    Sincerely,
    Danielle M. Payeur

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  • American Studies English project -- Kayleigh, Mon, January 10 2005, 7:36:34 (24.62.241.203)
    My name is Kayleigh, I am currently enrolled at Pembroke Academy in Pembroke New Hampshire. Recently in my American Studies English class, we started learning about the Vietnam War by reading Tim O' Brien's The Things They Carried. Shortly after starting the story, I became interested in the opinions of other Vietnam veterans who fought the war at home and overseas. My English teacher started a project to do research about the stories of other Vietnam veterans. As I looked through the war stories on your web site, I felt like I needed to thank all of you by not forgetting the war, even though the war occured before I was born. One of the requirements of the project is to get responses from the web sites, and I chose your site to do research. If anyone is interested in getting their stories out please feel free to email me at HoOpSnStArZ23@aol.com and the more responses I can get would be greatly appreciated. I thank you for what you did for our country by risking your lives to fight in a war whos soldiers should never be forgotten.

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  • Student Response -- Eric C., Mon, January 10 2005, 7:00:51 (24.62.241.203)
    My name is Eric and I am from one of the classes that Jim Morris teaches at Pembroke Academy in Pembroke, NH. After reading one of your stories, MY ENEMY, I am truly wowed at the accuracy and the content of the story. My family was not affected by Vietnam at all, but we were lucky. Although my family did not serve, I have interviewed combat veterans in our area to really get a sense of what went on over there. This story shows how noble the Americans were and how they too felt bad for taking the life of an ultimately innocent human being who had done nothing to the Americans in the first place. I am blessed to have such great and noble veterans who protected and still protect my country and our freedom.

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  • In reguard to your story Last Supper -- Ryan E, Mon, January 10 2005, 6:57:25 (24.62.241.203)
    Dear Joseph Connelly,

    thank you for the story, I got a naval based story, all my other stories, were on land good to find a water based story. I sorry, for all the things that happened to you. but thank you for fighting for what I have today. I am writing for an English final. I am glad I am doing it too, Vietnam was a brutal war. THANK YOU for the story.

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  • I regaurd to your poem Forget Me Not -- Ryan E, Mon, January 10 2005, 6:47:44 (24.62.241.203)
    Dear Don Poss,

    let me start off by saying that i liked your poem, I would like to let you know, I will never forget those who fought in the Vietnam war. I don't know anyone personally, but the memory of thoses who did and didn't die will live. I am researching literature, for a apart of my english final. I am glad that I had a opportunity to research. otherwise i wouldn't have read your story. Thank You for the story.

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  • Student -- Graton Champney, Fri, January 07 2005, 9:42:17 (24.62.241.203)
    My class was told to do some web browsing for our unit about Vietnam. I found this site and read one of the stories, The Other Side. I found this story kind of sad that vets had no memorial and that no one really cared until one was built. Thank god someone had the sense to honor you soldiers. Thank you for the stories shared on this sight and thank you to those who faught for thier country during that horrible conflict.

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  • BienHoa After TET68 -- Joe Steele, Mon, January 19 2004, 16:59:59 (205.188.209.38)
    I'm trying to locate anyone who served at BienHoa in the early months of 1968.I was sent TDY from CamRahnBay to help supplement the 3rd SPS .Durning that time the base was hit by 122s' and 12 soliders were killed in a bunker deemed "Safe".as a result of a direct hit all were killed upon contact.Myself and other SPs' were radomly picked to got and help with the removal of the bodies from the bunker.I've filed a claim for PTSD and was denied since "they" say I was never there.What I'm l;ooking for is anyone who might have access to duty rosters or morning reports to prove I was indeed TDY there. Thank you for any support you can give..

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  • Reply to the story a rock and a hard place -- Ryan E., Fri, January 07 2005, 7:10:42 (24.62.241.203)
    Dear Charles R. O'Dell,

    I read your story a rock and a hard place, and I can possible imagine the fear that you encountered that night. However your story was has made me think a little different about war. I am researching this for an english project, and I wrote to tell you that, I liked the story. I really helped me.

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  • Re: FREE Veterans Locator Services -- karena waddell, Mon, December 27 2004, 10:25:22 (12.144.211.146)
    i am trying to locate my biological father. his name is Richard Milts. he was a vietnam vetern in the 1960s.Hw would be about 59 years old now. Can you please help me find him,THANKS!

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  • Liberty Bridge 2 WIAs Jan-Feb 1969 -- Snuffy Jackson, Tue, January 04 2005, 12:35:12 (198.22.236.230)
    my name is Joe (Snuffy) Jackson. I served with HQ-2-13, E-2-13, (They went home 8/26/68) then L-4-11 and Finally C-1-11.
    I am looking for marines who served at Liberty Bridge during the winter of 68-69. I was passing through when a firefight broke out nearby. I took a squad of non-infantry to help out. We found 2 WIAs (EM + SGt) 1 mile NE. I am seeking their identities. A squad led by a Lt joined us. The two were medevaced at sunset. I never found out what became of the two or of the rest of their squad. My E-mail is da0730@banet.net.

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  • Equipted For War? -- Wayne Gregory, Sun, December 19 2004, 18:52:28 (209.240.205.60)
    Recently the Secretary of Defense responded to a question about the lack of armor on humvees and the neccessity of scrounging steel from junkyards to plate equipt. The response was "we go to war with the equipt. we have, not neccessarily the equipt. we wished we had." I viewed it as an honest statement, however leaving himself open to ridicule.

    My own personal experience of going to war in Vietnam: I was a 0311, rifleman, basic occupation for Marines. I was advised in ITR we would recieve jungle utilities and jungle boots on arriving in Nam. When I arrived in Da Nang, I was wearing the standard utilities, no side pockets, and black boots from Camp Pendleton. I kept wondering when I would get jungle boots. That's a big deal for grunts because of drying, and comfortability of movement as a ground soldier. I went three months without the jungle gear. I instantly went on a major operation which lasted a month in the DMZ. (Prairie) My utilities eventually rotted off my back. The black boots turned leathery and brown. I was a gun ammo humper and point man on the operation, being a boot. I felt like a boot with this old gear from training. Getting gear, clothes, and other neccessities was work. When you got some time in, out there, and knew the ropes, you began to know how to survive.

    I got jungle gear when I went to sniper school and I felt real smelly and bootish in my new gear. I saw stacks of fresh supplies in the rear, yet my fellow grunt Marines saw none of it. We were basically rationed jungle boots and utilities. You had to show your rotted off utilities to the platoon sgt, or right guide to get new gear. I was no exception, this was standard procedure "out there." When new guys showed up in green stuff, they had an odor about them. Tan utilities were red badges of courage, and to have new stuff on meant stand back, until this guy proved himself.

    When I first arrived at 3rd Batallion, I was taken to the bunker. I was issued an old M-14 with rust on it. The unforgivable sin of rust on a weapon. The stock was yellow with a chunk out of it. If I could find that rifle today, I would want it bronzed and buried with it first. It became my best friend. It never let me down. I was given an old worn cartridge belt with dried blood, and rummaged for canteens, plastic or metal. I liked metal for some reason but they were being fazed out. When I got to the lines, oh yeah, the lines, all men out there, and no whining. I rummaged thru an ammo box for rounds, dried mud on some but cleaned them up, oiled them and slapped 17 in the magazine.

    I have no idea what happened to equipting us out there in the Vietnam War. But I do know that the Secretary of Defenses response was accurate, at least in our case. If the politicians can't handle his statement, then change it and quit making him a scapegoat.

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  • Happy New Year -- Don Poss, Sat, January 01 2005, 2:44:05 (67.120.24.72)
    Vietvets: Happy New Year to all...and Welcome Home!

    Don Poss

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  • ? for Northridge about Liberty Bridge -- Wayne Gregory, Thu, September 02 2004, 0:21:36 (209.240.205.68)
    I'm sometimes in a quandery over Liberty Bridge. My squad served as security for a week for a bridge about 5mi? south of Da Nang in the summer of 67. I don't remember it called Liberty Bridge, and it was rather small, but the only known bridge connecting Da Nang with points south, like Hill 10 and 55 and many Marine units. There was also an Army Unit stationed south of here as I recall. Was this bridge blown and another longer bridge built in 68? The Liberty Bridges I see in the background seem longer than this one.

    You are truly amazing in your research and attempts to solve questions. You were on target about units. Units should be attached to the kias of the war for better research into their life at war. If it too late for Nam, then attn should be given to those in Iraq and Afghanastan today. Their families deserve this, and there will be inqueries many years from now similar to Nam.

    Thanks for your diligence and research.

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  • Seeking info about C7 Caribou insertion mission -- J McCauley, Sat, November 08 2003, 12:52:10 (65.25.155.6)
    Does anyone remember a C-7 Caribou of the 459TAS at the Danang detachment flying a mission in the latter part of '68 in which a radio Jeep and Spec Forces Captain were inserted somewhere in the boonies? I was a radio repair guy just going along for the ride that day.

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  • Photograph- Khe Sahn -- Kim Rowell, Fri, November 19 2004, 7:49:43 (138.86.178.18)
    I was wondering if anyone could help me to find a photograph of a scene in the Battle of Khe Sahn. It is of a marine with writing on the back saying something to the effect of "if you are a marine fighting in this war, then you are already dead"

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  • AMERICAN FLAG RETIREMENT -- Charles Taliaferro, Mon, December 27 2004, 8:12:23 (205.157.151.39)
    You can retire your tattered, worn out and frayed American flags without cost to you. Send your flags to the Kitchen Table Gang Trust, 42922 Avenue 12, Madera, CA 93638-8866 and we will dispose of your flags in a proper and dignified manner with full honors pursuant to the United States Code. Please, don’t throw your old flags away, send them to us!

    Thanks,

    Charles Taliaferro
    THE KITCHEN TABLE GANG TRUST
    http://www.kitchentablegang.org

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  • Re: Cycling Around Africa -- Uschi, Sun, December 19 2004, 1:57:04 (198.54.202.242)
    Rob - how are your plans progressing for Cycling Around Africa - Do you need any sponsors and when are you planning to leave on your tour. Are you Rob previously GM Salt Rock Hotel (1988) - just wondering? Otherwise the very best of luck in your venture - when did you join Rotary? And which club are you with. Regards Uschi

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  • Supply Convoys -- Wayne Gregory, Sat, October 23 2004, 3:06:47 (209.240.205.60)
    I noticed we recently had a problem with supply convoys in Iraq. This is unacceptable. Supply convoys must move on schedule regardless. I also noticed "bottled water" mentioned as a must in the desert and understandable. It took me back to water neccessities in Vietnam, and it might surprise to know that water was not always accessable or plentiful in Nam. Water could be all around you, but little to fill the canteens. You could survive without c-rats and we did, but water is a neccessity.

    "Nook" it was known as. When I first entered the Nam, I was given halizone tabs to drop into the canteen of muddy water. Salts, or experienced grunts laughed, and told me to chuck the tabs. I didn't mind the chlorine taste at first, but I soon realized what they meant. Better to taste the mud than the chlorine mixed with mud. We got water from where we found it. It might be a green river with leeches, a bomb crater, or a pond in a valley. It was water and meant survival. We were never supplied with fresh water on operations. My first was Prairie in the dmz area and lasted almost a month. Water or "nook" saved my life. I was off gathering water in a green stale river when mortars landed in the ranks of my company and across my fighting hole.

    My memories of water are vivid as a grunt. You carried your own supply and never borrowed from a fellow grunt. It was one of those rules you didn't break. Carry as many canteens as you choose, with the load you are already assigned. Your choice, but don't borrow from a fellow brother. Sharing nook with a wounded comrade or heat stroke victim was another matter. Water was a precious commodity because that was what you made that instant coffee or cocoa with under a heat tab. Grunts are creative, and you take your cue from a new invention. Sweetened kool aid was one, but mix enough of that with with river water over a time, and you start to feel the blandness.

    Village wells were the pits. The water had this smokey stale taste. Mama son would sometimes draw you the water while smiling with red teeth. Rice Paddies were off limits. The water had fertilizer in it and very stale, and not always animal fertilizer. Remember the farmers irrigation, and how fresh and clean that water looked? You knew better. One thing a grunt could sense, was clean water. Some Operations afforded grunts with fresh running streams. Rivers were seldom clean.

    To any soldier who supplies the front lines. The success of war depends upon you. Not only in supplies, but the hope and knowledge you care and the link to support from the outside. In Nam, our convoys were attacked every day, and those soldiers knew their mission and the importance of it. Whether choppers or six-bys, they made sure we knew they were there. For that I am proud of my genre of service and brotherhood. We do what we must to win!

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  • C-130 crash An Khe 1967 -- Ginger Pruss, Tue, August 24 2004, 20:46:20 (69.39.70.162)
    Vincent J. Bowen is my friend. I am helping him compile complete info for his PTSD claim. He was at An Khe Base Camp Nov66-Aug67. His Unit 1stCav BBatt 2nd/20th was in the field, but he was working construction at Base Camp. Have obtained "histories" of his Unit, but they do not contain info about Base Camp. Can anyone help with a date (or source of data) about a C-130 that crashed on take-off and landed in an ammo bunker. The plane was destroyed. 100+ Vietnamese civilian passengers were safely evacuated. The ammo exploded for hours. There is an old post on this site re: this, but it is also a request for info. So at least one other person remembers it!!!!

    Any info would be greatly appreciated. Thank you. Ginger

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  • Fall of Saigon 1975 -- Michael Herrera, Sat, November 27 2004, 12:11:25 (66.236.61.68)
    I was stationed at Brooke Army Medical Center at Fort Sam Houston, Texas where I worked in ICU/CCU. I was coming off the grave yard shift and turned on the TV before going to bed and saw the last helicopter lift of the American Embassy building. I felt completely overwhelmed and took two alka-seltzer and went to bed. What I want to know is how did other Vietnam veterans react to the fall of Saigon?

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  • Info needed from Vietnam Vets -- Veronica, Wed, November 17 2004, 17:30:53 (206.74.89.177)
    Thank you and God bless you all ... and thank all of you who responded to my post sharing your experiences with me. Again, I know it is painful, but if you are willing to share with me, for my compilation, would any of you share how you were treated once you arrived back to the States? I know it all won't be pretty but it is part of this history.
    For all of you who haven't heard it, well - it's 30+ late but, Welcome Home.

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  • Who was that Gi? Who came through the maingate at Ubon, Thailand in his bitthday suit. -- Robert Williams, Thu, November 25 2004, 4:57:43 (140.186.149.178)
    It was a cold midnight shift on the Main Gate at Ubon, Thailand when the thai guard named (Prayoon)and a Thai Air Force troop name unknown were working the gate with me.The baht bus stopped running at around 0100hrs and any Gi's that straggled in to the base most of them pie eyed would come all spralled out in samlaws or taxies.Well at just about 0130 hrs a samlaw driver delivers a person to the gate pretty drunk and no cloths except his underwhear. needless to say it was pretty funny. I asked him for his base Id card and he kept reaching for his pockets looking for his walet.We knew he was an American but we figured we would have a little fun with him. He had let us know that he was a Security Police man and he was assigned to the 8th SPS SQ. SECURITY SECTION So we let him dirrect a little traffic in his missing uniform for about thirty minutes. We then called a Law Enforcement vehicle to transport him to his quarters. Still to this day I have no idea who this crack troop was but he kept us laughing and awake for a while.So if any one of you old security troops can remember directing trafic and feeling a breese at the main gate I am the LE troop that gave you some OJT on gate duty. Oh by the way I think the statue of limitations have ran out. I would like to apoligise to you for letting you embarrasing yourself so HA! I would like to find out who you are so sound off. 8thspsubon@surfglobal.net.

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  • 1970 Danang-MAG-11 Hooch Area Rocket Attack -- Dave Stevens, Sat, October 23 2004, 7:16:23 (207.5.128.123)
    I am desperately seeking information on a rocket attack that hit the MAG-11 enlisted hooch area at Danang Air Base in 1970. I served with H&MS-11 from Dec 1969-Dec 1970. I'm not sure if the rocket hit a hooch from H&MS-11, VMA 224, VMA 225 or one of the other squadrons attached to Marine Air Group 11. At least one Marine died and several were wounded. Anything you could do to help prove the rocket attack took place: a date; names; photo or other records would be greatly appreciated.

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