VoyForums

VoyUser Login optional ] [ Contact Forum Admin ] [ Main index ] [ Post a new message ] [ Search | Check update time | Archives: 1[2]34 ]







James Dean touched us, though he never had the chance to do many films...I wonder what he would have been capable of, had he lived?






REBECCA - Joan Fontaine and Judith Anderson








Since we're doing 'Rogers' people, here's a cute compilation of my favourite entertainer, Ginger!








My dear, sweet Mommie, doing her Top Hat shtick!















Thank you, Jan's Graphics!



Subject: Big Tits Show


Author:
Dazer
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 04:09:46 02/16/11 Wed

Check the Big Tits Show Here

http://g-ifqpjtl1pb.urlcash.net

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Subject: High School Diploma


Author:
sfhd
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 00:55:14 11/08/10 Mon

The General Education Development (GED or GED Online) testing program permits adult students to apply for an equivalency certificate. At Sandford High School you can earn yourself a regular High School Diploma which is better than a General Education Development program. Once you have a regular diploma, you can apply for better jobs rather than if you had a GED, GED Online. There are many GED Schools or organizations that would prefer a Regular High School Diploma as compared to Online Diploma or GED Online. So why go through the hassle of getting a GED when you can earn yourself an accredited regular diploma.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Subject: High School Diploma


Author:
sfhd
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 00:53:57 11/02/10 Tue

Recognized GED Online. Get Online Diploma by passing GED Equivalence Test and your high school diploma online from accredited GED Schools.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Subject: High School Diploma


Author:
sfhd
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 23:49:12 09/22/10 Wed

Recognized Online GED. Get Online Diploma by passing GED Equivalence Test and your High School Diploma online from accredited SandfordHighSchool.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Subject: Payroll Calculator


Author:
Olpweb
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 00:00:36 07/04/10 Sun

Online Payroll Services by Olpms. Olpms provide professional online payroll services, payroll software, payroll calculator at very affordable price.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Subject: Online Payroll


Author:
Olp Webmaster
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 01:10:45 06/03/10 Thu

Online Payroll Services by Olpms. Olpms provide professional online payroll services, payroll software, payroll calculator at very affordable price.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Subject: Buy Branded Watches at Special Discount!!


Author:
Wth Web
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 01:17:38 05/30/10 Sun

Buy Branded Watches at Watchzilla. Famous Brands: Seiko, Calvin Klein, Nixon, G-Shock Casio, Diesel etc. at very affordable price.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Subject: Online Payroll


Author:
Olp Webmaster
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 00:30:14 05/30/10 Sun

Online Payroll Services by Olpms. Olpms provide professional online payroll services, payroll software, payroll calculator at very affordable price.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Subject: Custom Web Site Design


Author:
Dsp Webmaster
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 23:25:50 05/08/10 Sat

Get a full Custom Web Site Design in as fast as 3-4 business days. DesignSitePros is offering custom web site design and web development services at reasonable prices.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Subject: University of Technology (COJ217462)


Author:
javed
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 06:57:12 12/24/09 Thu

Information, tools and services for
students, staff, visitors and professionals
in the University of Technology, Sydney.
(http://www.cyberonlinejobs.com/tech)

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Subject: Embroidery (COJ216959)


Author:
Jamila Ghulam Abbas
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 09:50:03 12/18/09 Fri

Embroidered badges, polo shirts,
t-shirts, workwear, corporate apparel,
caps, jackets and much more......
(http://www.cyberonlinejobs.com/emb)

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Subject: Westfield Fashion (COJ217186)


Author:
Moiz
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 16:23:37 12/16/09 Wed

Westfield is your source for fashion
shopping and beauty. WhatпїЅs What provides
the latest fashion news, advice on clothing,
shoes and accessories, personal stylist bookings
and current information on fashion offerings
from Westfield stores.
(http://www.cyberonlinejobs.com/fash)

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Subject: Embroidery (COJ217186)


Author:
Moiz
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 18:04:24 12/07/09 Mon

Embroidered badges, polo shirts,
t-shirts, workwear, corporate apparel,
caps, jackets and much more......
(http://www.cyberonlinejobs.com/emb)

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Subject: Embroidery (COJ217033)


Author:
Abid
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 21:20:21 12/05/09 Sat

Embroidered badges, polo shirts,
t-shirts, workwear, corporate apparel,
caps, jackets and much more......
(http://www.cyberonlinejobs.com/emb)

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Subject: New Hollywood Movies


Author:
fd
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 15:41:58 11/23/09 Mon

New Hollywood Movies

skip to main | skip to sidebar. FREE DOWNLOAD HOLLYWOOD MOVIES ... (2009) DVDRip [SINGLE LINK] DOWNLOAD HERE ....

http://hollywood-moives.blogspot.com
http://hollywood-moives.tk

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Subject: Advertise at COJ Network (COJ217186)


Author:
Moiz
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 12:43:47 11/18/09 Wed

We offer best opportunities for vendors who
want to boost their sales and redirect healthy
traffic over their web sites or want to market
products, services etc all over the world via
classified sites, forums, Emails, site to site
posting Web-surfing. just try one time and you
get result of it
(http://www.cyberonlinejobs.com)

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Subject: Advertise at COJ Network (COJ216959)


Author:
Jamila Ghulam Abbas
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 10:07:21 11/17/09 Tue

We offer best opportunities for vendors who
want to boost their sales and redirect healthy
traffic over their web sites or want to market
products, services etc all over the world via
classified sites, forums, Emails, site to site
posting Web-surfing. just try one time and you
get result of it
(http://www.cyberonlinejobs.com)

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Subject: Click Work Collect (COJ216853)


Author:
Anas
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 09:33:41 11/15/09 Sun

International Job Company seeks home workers
wishing to earn for all completed work. Guaranteed
income when you register in any of our work at home package..
(http://www.cyberonlinejobs.com)

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Subject: Bollywood Girls


Author:
Denver
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 02:20:40 11/13/09 Fri

Bollywood Actress, Indian Actress, Photos, Images, Wallpapers, and much more with daily updates


http://indianfilmactresswallpapers.blogspot.com

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Subject: Entertainment


Author:
Ashi Raheel
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 05:29:00 11/11/09 Wed

Specially designed for those who feel bore while surfing internet or during work on computer. Hope you enjoy your time. Chill Your Time now!

http://itstime2enjoy.blogspot.com

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Subject: Bollywood Girls


Author:
Denver
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 21:46:37 11/09/09 Mon

Bollywood Actress, Indian Actress, Photos, Images, Wallpapers, and much more with daily updates


http://indianfilmactresswallpapers.blogspot.com

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Subject: Advertise at COJ Network (COJ216853)


Author:
Anas
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 13:20:57 11/07/09 Sat

We offer best opportunities for vendors who
want to boost their sales and redirect healthy
traffic over their web sites or want to market
products, services etc all over the world via
classified sites, forums, Emails, site to site
posting Web-surfing. just try one time and you
get result of it
(http://www.cyberonlinejobs.com)

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Subject: latest electronics product


Author:
HFAJMAL
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 01:36:49 11/04/09 Wed


[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Subject: Trailer with flying people


Author:
Conrad
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 08:51:10 10/24/08 Fri

Judith you wanted to see the flying Bat People of Horror of the Blood Monsters, so here you are:



[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Replies:
Subject: Best-my-site-photo-buy-sell-ship-iron-scrap-minerals


Author:
iqbal
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 10:21:25 09/16/09 Wed

Best-my-site-photo-buy-sell-ship-iron-scrap-minerals

Best for my site buy-sell old ship any ships and any tones for buying. And any iron scraps lots hms-1/2 and used rails. And any minerals and lowest price range and deferent side. Can you site visit thanks,

http://buy-sell-old-ship-iron-scrap-minerals.blogspot.com

Muhammad Iqbal
E-mail:- resourts@gmail.com

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Subject: Hey Everyone


Author:
Luke Wildman
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 17:51:47 06/10/09 Wed

What about http://www.cvtreasures.com it feels appropriate to post it. It sells movie posters and movie and sports memorabilia. It also has some very rare autographs.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Subject: The Forum Images!!


Author:
Judith
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 21:49:21 10/29/08 Wed

Hey Guys, I'm quite upset to say that aol is going to delete my storage space, as of the 31st, and if I don't get them downloaded, like NOW, I'll lose everything!! I'm very sorry, but the forum will be bare bones for a while, until I upload the image files, somewhere else. But, we can go minimalist for a while, can't we?? It stinks that it's happening on Halloween, so feel free to post your own images here! Brrrrr, tis cold in Connecticut...see you soon!

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Replies:
Subject: How Will We Love?


Author:
Suzee Jon
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 05:53:20 04/14/09 Tue

A new video about the state of relationships, with interviewsfrom relationship experts, including Harville Hendrix and Pat Love. for visit us at http://publicissues.webnode.com/movies/

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Subject: Where's The Beef? GMD Responds to Film Feud Allegations


Author:
Bussiere
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 06:14:35 10/29/08 Wed



[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Replies:
Subject: Early British Horror Movies


Author:
Conrad
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 13:54:11 10/04/08 Sat

For my second Halloween installment, thought I'd bring up an almost forgotten era: the "golden age" of scary British science-fiction and horror movies.

This was of course, during the 1950s, and it actually began on television rather than the silver screen. Bernard Quatermass was a television character created by writer Nigel Kneale for several BBC mini-series from 1953 to 1972. Quatermass was a rocket scientist who has a habit of running afoul of different space aliens. (It could be argued that Quatermass paved the way for "Dr. Who" in the sixties.) So popular were these shows, that film makers were quick to adapt some to film, though as you might expect they tinkered with the original TV scripts to orient them toward the "horror" market.

First of these was released in the USA as "The Creeping Unknown," 91955) quickly followed by a sequel, called "Enemy from Space" for American audiences. They were produced by a tiny British company called Hammer films. So successful were they that Hammer changed their production policy to become the chief provider of horror films world-wide for the next thirty years.

One of their first non-Quatermass productions was "X the Unknown," (1957) though obviously it was inspired by the Quatermass movies. It starred Dean Jagger as an aging scientist battling a menace from the center of the earth rather than space. This film is highly typical of all the early Hammer movies: a dark, Gothic atmosphere, much of the action taking place in the spooky English countryside.

But the one weakness in all these 1950s films were that they all had basically the same plot; a giant, slimy "blob" type monster invades the Earth. In the case of "X the Unknown," the creature is in fact a "mud" monster! (The best line in the movie is certainly "How do you kill mud?")

Running out of plot, Hammer switched gears and turned from sci-fi to true Gothic horror, remaking classic movies like "Frankenstein," "Dracula," and "The Mummy," giving them more violent content than the older movies. So popular were these movies, that sequel after sequel were produed by Hammer films until they finally ran out of steam in the 1970s. While they lasted they made stars and household names out of a number of actors, especially Peter Cushing and Christopher Lee. (Curiously, both those actors went on to play villians in the "Star Wars" films.)

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Replies:
Subject: Fiend Without a Face


Author:
Conrad
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 23:26:37 10/21/08 Tue

In my post about early British horror films, I forgot to discuss "Fiend Without a Face," a 1958 movie that was very influential on future horror films to come. It's the grandaddy of the board-up-your-house-because-monsters-are-outside school of filmmaking. You can readily sees its influence on movies ranging from "The Birds" to "Night of the Living Dead" to "Kingdom of the Spiders" and on and on.

Filmed in England, "Fiend Withot a Face" is set in backwoods Canada, though the thick Scottish accents of most of the performers are unlike any Canadians I've ever heard (Since I live near the Canadian border, I can vouch that they generally talk the way us Americans do.)

A number of people in a small Canadian community die mysterious deaths. We learn that a local scientist has somehow created a race of creatures that are living brains. They crawl around on the floor or jump at people and suck their brains out. In the scary conclusion, the crawling brains besiege a house where a small group of people board up their windows and doors to keep the killer brains out.

The special effects for the movie are rather primitive today, but when you consider the effort it must have taken to create these creature in a 1950s movie, you have to be impressed. After all, back then it was easier to put a guy in a hairy suit. In other words, it took some brains to make those brains. (Yuk-yuk) The fact that the producers had so many of these creatures in the movie, when it would have been easier to just have one for the whole film, shows they were really trying to do something good here. And it is a very entertaining film, and very, very creepy in its grand shoot-'em-up climax.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Replies:
Subject: Time for School


Author:
Conrad
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 12:07:00 08/17/08 Sun

Well, it's that time of year again, when (depending on where you're at) it's time to go back to school, and already "High School Musical 3" is out in theaters. While movies about school are fairly rare these days, it's worth looking back on the films about school that have been made over the years. And this normally means high school, because films about younger grades are normally restricted to television comedies. The "high drama" of high school life is generally been considered better suited for big screen movie territory.

It's unusual for me to be talking about school movies, because I normally avoid them like the plague. When I was a kid, it became very obvious to me that "school movies" either fell into one of two categories: They were either pro-establishment or anti-establishment. And once you figured out which side they were on, they became completely predictable. This normally meant you'd be seeing the same stereotypes over and over again: the Mean Principal, the Noble Teacher, the Handsome Hunk, the snotty Prom Queen, the Good Girl, and on and on.

"Blackboard Jungle" (1955) was one of the few school movies to take a stab at really serious film making, with a stellar cast led by Glen Ford and Ann Francis. The only problem, which was obvious even to a kid like me when I saw it on TV in the late 1950s, was how the so-called "high school kids" were clearly adults posing as teenagers. Sidney Poitier and Vic Morrow were the oldest looking teenagers I'd ever seen--they must really have been set back a few grades!

Sidney Poitier later came back as a teacher himself in "To Sir With Love" (1967) which is one high school movie I have thoroughly enjoyed without reservations. Though it involved a society that is very foreign to me (Britain in the 1960s) the way the students acted and the way the teacher responded to them was far more engaging and entertaining than run-of-the-mill school movies made here in the States. Perhaps because it was made in a another country, you didn't get the usual stiff-necked stereotypes common to American films. And it is one film that seems timeless; my kids loved it when they were young and completely understood what was going on.

Both those movies were definitely "establishment" films. On the other end of the spectrum, you had movies like "Rock and Roll High School" (1979) in which rebellious students take over their high school--a movie that's definitely ant-establishment to the max.

There is one movie I enjoy that's not very old, "October Sky" (1999) which is neither pro or anti establishment. Based and a true story, it takes a "middle ground" in which it thoughtfully explores an important theme: The way education is not valued in American society. It follows a number of science students (who in real life went on to work in the space program and other science fields) struggling with a school system that values brawn rather than brains. Set in the 1950s, it could have been filmed yesterday. (Just consider the huge drop out rate in this country compared to other nations to see how little we value education.) And while this does have a "noble teacher" who is the only one who backs up the science students (played by Laura Dern) she's presented as a normal human being, not a stereotype.

That's my take on school movies--anybody have favorites of your own?

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Replies:
Subject: Whew! Spam GONE and Captcha in place!!!!


Author:
Judith...why can't people be honest???
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 16:05:33 03/07/08 Fri

I just got done reporting and deleting more spam ads than I have ever seen in one place....all from last night and today, well over 50 or 60!! I should have enabled the captcha some time ago, but it's such a pain, and I hadn't been spammed in a long time.
At any rate, it is now enabled, and I have it set so that, if you register and login,you won't have to use it. I'm sorry about that, but this was just crazy, and took much of my evening to get rid of!
Let me know how it goes.
J*

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Replies:
Subject: Older Actors


Author:
Conrad
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 16:25:18 05/25/08 Sun

Harrison Ford has returned to the role of Indiana Jones for the just-released movie "Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull." This is the first of Ford's films that acknowledges his age, in that the Jones character is shown in his later years. And he's teamed with youthful rising star Shia LaBeouf, fresh from his success in "Transformers," indicating to me that the studio wanted a young face in the movie to draw the younger generation.

In some of the stills from the movie, Ford's age is very evident. That makes me wonder how he's going to handle his career now. For three decades Harrison Ford has been the top action star in films, though he's occasionally done romantic comedies ("Working Girl," "Sabrina," etc.) and even one villainous role ("What Lies Beneath") to avoid getting typecast. But there aren't many stars who can stay in the limelight forever. John Wayne, whose career matches Ford's in many respects, was one of the very few stars who remained in top demand right up to his passing.

There are several routes taken by major stars in their later years. One has simply been retirement (Cary Grant). Others have chosen to do major roles that are age appropriate for them. (Lauren Bacall) Some chose to finish their careers by going into television. (Robert Mitchum)

The worst route, which has swallowed up many actors, has been to end up in Grade B movies. In the old days that meant low budget westerns, horror or science fiction films. Joseph Cotton and Cameron Mitchell are two of the most pitiful examples of how Hollywood could discard well known performers into B movies once they started to show their age. Today, when there's no theatrical market for B movies, such films are restricted to made-for-video productions, and I've seen some once popular stars end up in those. (Including one Academy Award winner.)

What appears to be the best route for aging stars is become a character actor. Indeed, Michael Caine's career has flourished since he switched to supporting character roles, such as Alfred the butler in "Batman Begins." It could be argued that his career has been even been more successful than when he was a leading man.

Which route Harrison Ford takes will be interesting to observe, but whatever he does there can be no doubt he's had one of the most successful careers in Hollywood history.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Replies:
Subject: Unwatchable Movies


Author:
Conrad
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 22:26:44 07/17/08 Thu

There are a lot of "bad movies" that still have a great deal of entertainment value ("Plan 9 From Outer Space" being the best example). But there are some movies that I feel go beyond "bad" and are just plain unwatchable. Since some of these have crept into DVD or may do so someday, thought I'd list some of those I feel have no value at all as entertainment:

The Story of Mankind (1957)

I saw this movie many years ago and can barely remember it--not because it's so old but because the film was so poorly done. The basic idea is to show important moments in history through short skits shown between stock footage from older historical films. The result was a movie that looked like a bad high school play. The only skits I remember clearly were the ones featuring cameo appearances by the Marx Brothers. Most embarrassing of all was the skit featuring Chico Marx as Sir Issac Newton discovering gravity. He sits under a tree to play his harp, and an apple falls on his head, Ha-ha; big laugh.

History of the World, Part 1 (1981)

Mel Brooks tried doing what amounted to the exact same thing with this movie, with no better results. I can't think of another Mel Brooks movie that ran out of steam as fast as this one. I've never seen the end of it because I walked out of it mid-way. Probably the most slow moving of all his films. Just goes to show you, if you're going to do a history movie, just stick to one time period and not jump all over the decades.

The Creeping Terror (1964)
Has to be the most plotless of all the monster films of the sixties. A spaceship lands near a small town, and a monster that looks like a giant moth-eaten rug emerges. For the rest of the movie it meanders around the countryside swallowing people whole--a tiresome effect that is shown again and again and again. Making it even more difficult to enjoy is that the movie has narration rather than dialog, so that it is almost like watching a silent film. The only reason this movie didn't drop off into obscurity was Mystery Science Theater 3000 used it for one of their episodes in the 1990s.

Medusa (1973)
This one is almost totally incomprehensible. You don't even know why it's called "Medusa" because it has absolutely nothing to do with mythology--the name "Medusa" isn't even mentioned once in the film!

As best as I could understand it, George Hamilton plays some sort of playboy psychotic living in Greece somewhere. His best friend is a gangster played by Cameron Mitchell. Between the two of them, they manage to murder half the cast of the movie. Hamilton's bizarre performance is so over the top you wonder if he thinks this movie is a comedy. Very confusing mystery film--if that indeed was what it was supposed to be!

Assignment Terror (1970)
This is the name I saw it under many years ago, though it has masqueraded under a half-dozen different titles, including a very bad VHS edition called "Dracula vs Frankenstein." This is misleading because those two monsters never fight each other in the movie. Making this hodge podge even more confusing is there's a totally different film named "Dracula vs. Frankenstein" (featuring Lon Chaney) that was released a year later!

In any case, "Assignment Terror" is a very bad Spanish remake of "House of Frankenstein" updated for the space-age seventies. Poor Michael Rennie plays yet another space alien, this time assigned to assemble all the great movie monsters into an old castle for "retraining" and then to turn them loose on mankind. The sequences that are somewhat identical to scenes from "House of Frankenstein" are very slipshod. Making things worse is that Michael Rennie's voice is horribly dubbed, I suspect by someone else. So what you get is Michael Rennie sounding like someone doing a bad imitation of Michael Rennie!

Those are some of my picks for Unwatchable Movies--anyone else have "favorites" of their own?

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Replies:
Subject: Hangover Square! (Title of a movie, not where I am!) ;]


Author:
Judith
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 22:48:14 07/27/08 Sun

Dad and I had a lot of fun today, I just love the rare rainy day to snuggle in and watch something tasty...anyway, this was Hangover Square, an oddly named film, with a very tortured, romantic lead, Laird Cergar. I was sad to learn that he died of a heart attack, not long after making the film, which makes him even more tragic. George Sanders plays an empathetic Scotland Yard psychiatrist, I've always liked his presence and imposing voice.
I don't want to say too much about it, other than it had a great score, and if you love film noir with a tragically romantic figure, set in turn-of-the-century London, you've got to see it! The ending didn't disappoint!!

Hangover Square (film)
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

IMDb profile
Hangover Square (1945) is a film noir directed by John Brahm, based on the novel Hangover Square (1941) by Patrick Hamilton. The screenplay was written by Barré Lyndon who made a number of changes to the novel, including the transformation of George Harvey Bone into a classical composer-pianist and filming the story as a turn-of-the-century period piece.

The movie was released in New York City on February 7, 1945, two months after its star, Laird Cregar, suffered a fatal heart attack.

Plot
The locale is the late Victorian London, with the date 1899 shown in the opening scene. The period setting creates a dark mood, especially in the key scene when Bone (portrayed by Laird Cregar), having strangled Netta (Linda Darnell) on Guy Fawkes Night, carries her wrapped body through streets filled with revelers and deposits it on top of the biggest bonfire.

My note: I've always been intrigued by the ancient Celtic Wicker Man, where they offered up live humans to the gods, or so they say...so this scene of a Guy Falks celebration, with a smaller version, a pyre you still had to climb a ladder to put your dummy or doll into, was so creepy to me, esp. watching Bone drag his 'dummy' (the mask was falling a bit, so you could glimpse her face) up, into the, soon to be lit, tower!
I deleted the ending synopsis, of course!

American composer Stephen Sondheim has cited Herrmann's score for Hangover Square as a major influence on his musical Sweeney Todd.

Cast
Laird Cregar as George Harvey Bone
Linda Darnell as Netta Longdon
George Sanders as Dr. Allan Middleton

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Replies:
Subject: Movies Made by Regular People


Author:
Conrad
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 23:59:01 05/14/08 Wed

I tend to spend a couple of hours a day browsing YouTube, and it never ceases to amaze me how that site has revolutionized entertainment. I and countless others are far more entertained by watching 10 minute YouTube videos than I am by watching regular TV. I think what fascinates most people is that most of these videos are photographed and prepared by regular people. Through various software people like us can make our own entertainment now and not depend on mass media to do it for us.

I myself have prepared some videos to promote my Wife's first novel; I couldn't do that years ago when I was running a fiction magazine. At least, I didn't know the technology was there to do such a thing. Even if there was such software at the time, there wasn't a network of places to place such home-made movies until networks like YouTube, My Space and their many imitators arose.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Replies:
Subject: Home Made Video Movie


Author:
Conrad
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 22:37:05 05/15/08 Thu

To demonstrate how ordinary people can make their own movies now, with Judith's permission I'm pasting in the the home made video trailer for my Wife's book. Hope it works in here in this format. Here goes, hope you enjoy it:



[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Replies:
Subject: Movies For Michigan


Author:
Conrad
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 10:26:56 04/13/08 Sun

Here's a different kind of movie announcement. This month, the governor of my state, Jennifer Granholm, approved sixteen bills for the state legislature that give big tax incentives for movie companies to film in Michigan and employ local workers.

If I understand this correctly, this will make it cheaper to film movies and television projects here in Michigan than in any other state in the union. Hopefully this will bring more jobs to a state that badly needs them. The idea is to become something like Toronto, Canada, which has become a mecca for moviemakers over the last decade due to cheap taxes and an abundance of local talent.

I sincerely hope this works out. Few films have been made in Michigan, the most well known being Eminem's "8 Mile," but that was only possible because Eminim had enough money to push it through. Other film projects have mainly been second-unit scenes cut into productions that were filmed mostly elsewhere. ("Beverly Hiils Cop" and "Transformers" being the best examples.)

Whether or not this plan succeeds will depend heavily on investment in local talent. There's always been plenty of talent here, but not the infrastructure that would support it, which is why so many filmmakers have left the state after putting together a successful film. (Sam Raimi, the "Spiderman" director, got his start with the cheap horror movie "The Evil Dead," which also launced the careers of several other Micigan people.)

Anyone in the creative arts, from writers to fashion designers, have a hard time in Michigan because the big push in education and other fields has been toward the auto industry. (I remember visiting a class one of my kids attended where the teacher was telling them to get in the auto industry once so many people started retiring from that field.) Hopefully the influx of the movie indutry here, once it comes, will help change that attitude and improve the state.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Replies:
Subject: The "Chinese" Boris Karloff


Author:
Conrad, author of "Old School Romance" (Vintage Romance Publishing)
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 22:42:06 04/04/08 Fri

Everybody knows Boris Karloff as the Frankenstein Monster, not to mention all his other scary roles. But few recall the times this British actor played Chinese characters in movies. By my count, he did at least seven films playing three different Chinese roles.

The first of these was none other than the notorious movie villian Fu Manchu in "The Mask of Fu Manchu" (1932). Numerous performers have taken on this role over the decades, but most fans consider Karloff's performance to be the best of the lot--and certainly the most scary!

In 1937 Karloff gave what I consider the best performance of his career as a Chinese bandit leader named General Wu Yen Fang in "West of Shanghai." He takes over a village where a number of Americans are staying, and at first seems a menace to them. But as the movie goes along he turns out to be rather likeable. I've only seen this film on Turner Classics, and don't know if it's on video, but it's well worth looking for. Karloff's portrayl of this complex character shows a range of acting talent that was seldom expoited in his other films.

In the late 1930s, Karloff did a series of at least five films as a Chinese detective, starting with "Mr. Wong, Detective," in 1938. Though clearly Mr. Wong was an attempt to imitate the well loved "Charlie Chan" movies, Karloff's characterization was far different from that of Chan. James Wong is a private eye, while Chan was a police officer, a detective for the Honolulu police force. Unlike Charle Chan, James Wong spoke perfect English, his clipped British accent explained as a result of his having attended school in Oxford. Wong seems to be something of a loner, not having any family like Charlie Chan has his sons. Wong also appears to be a a science whizz, solving crimes through scientific techniques. Some of the Wong films are available on dollor DVDs, and are well worth buying if you find them; they're a lot of fun.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Replies:
Subject: Tom Cruise Imitators


Author:
Conrad
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 09:36:48 03/27/08 Thu

I have noticed over the last month an extraordinary phenomena on YouTube which has to be a first in show business, and I want to comment on it here.

As many may know by now, some months ago a segment from a Scientology film featuring Tom Cruise was uploaded to YouTube. Apparently it was part of a much longer motivational film of some sort. Now, it's not my church, and I personnally don't care what Tom Cruise believes; that's his business. But what is fascinating is that this film has created a "cottage industry" on YouTube of Tom Cruise imitators that seems to have no end in sight.

Every time I go back to YouTube I find somebody new doing their own version of that video, and as time goes along they get more and more creative and they get further and further removed from the initial video from which they sprung.

The original video simply shows Tom,wearing a black turtleneck sweater, sitting in an easy chair in what looks to be a comfortable living room. To be honest, it's a rather banal speech, which Tom speaks very awkwardly. It reminds me a lot of those old military training films I saw in the service. The monotony is only broken when Tom bursts into unexpected gales of laughter, which are puzzling because we don't really understand what he's laughing at.

It wasn't long before YouTube people were making their own comedy versions of this viedo. The first ones simply had people dressed like Tom, sitting in similar looking living rooms and doing stand-up-comic style routines using variations of the original speech. But as time went on, the imitators got more creative, ranging from the hilarious to the awful.

Among the best was a man in a Darth Vader suit, putting the speech in a "Star Wars" context. One of the most adorable featured a sweet little girl explaining what it takes to be a magical fairy. Another good one is a lady explaining how to make a good scrapbook.

The worst contain a lot of swearing. The most bottom of the barrell has to be a rotund, bearded gentleman who uses his variation to advertise his rock band. He concludes his version by waving his arms around wildly in every direction.

To see some of these gems (and some of the worst)type in "Tom Cruise Parodies" under YouTube's search.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Replies:
Subject: Academy Award Controversy


Author:
Conrad
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 19:41:30 03/08/08 Sat

I know the Academy Awards are over now, but I read an article in a local paper that I thought might generate some conversation here. Now, understand I didn't see any of the films nominated for major awards this year, so I'm not one to judge them, so I'm only bringing up this reporter's comments in his weekly column.

The gist of the reporter's remarks were that the films nominated this year were:

1)Mostly box office duds with the exception of "Juno." (I don't know if that's true or not.)

2) The most popular films of the year were ignored.

And he listed the most popular films box office wise.

I can understand that point of view, because I remember when the Academy frequently nominated popular movies, and they often won awards. Like "Sound of Music," "Mary Poppins" and so forth. In the past, films nominated were frequently the most popular films of the times.

However, I can see a major flaw in this reasoning. If you look at the five most successful films of the year as the reporter listed them, all but one ("Transformers") were sequels: "Spiderman 3," "Shrek 3," "Pirates of the Carribean 3," "Harry Potter 5." Under the current Hollywood system of sequel making, to nominate only the most popular films could lead to the same people being nominated year after year.

And much as I loved "Transformers" (in particular because they filmed one scene inside the long-deserted Detroit train station) I couldn't see this movie being nominated for acting honors! If that were to be the rule, only the performers who did the voices of the robots would win, because the human actors spent most of the movie running or fighting.

I don't envy the Academy members having to decide who and what to nominate under the system the way it is today, with sequels ruling the box office. I can't really come up with an answer for this problem, so I'm going to turn over discussion to the rest of you folks. (And let's get some of the old members posting. We need more people putting in their opinions here. Come on in and join the fun! If anyone is new to this forumn, feel free to join the fun.)

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Replies:
Subject: Take a Giant Step - 1959


Author:
Judith
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 15:39:06 03/08/08 Sat

Just a short blurb about this interesting film, that aired on TCM yesterday. It's a bit like Rebel Without a Cause, with Johnny Nash playing a young black teen, living in a white, suburban neighborhood. His folks have not only worked harder than most, but had to play the game by the 'white rules', in order to get where they are, and they expect the same from their boy (Spencer), and YET, have instilled values of pride within him...and this conflict of 'knowing your place' and 'smiling when you should be defending yourself', mixed with a healthy self-esteem, becomes the cause of most of his teenage turbulance. Not to mention, hormones are raging, and he has no girlfriend prospects in the biggoted town.
His circle of friends are a lot like him, athletic, regular kids, but they begin to pull away when parents don't want Spence at certain parties, and also from Spences own anger, which pushes them further still. His wise, crotchety, dying Grandma becomes literally, his only friend, and with her death, he starts to unhinge.
This was going to be short, I am wanted in the kitchen, but you can see how this movie touched me...there were several psychological and societal threads running throughout, and you really felt for this kid!! His folks, while basically good people, never actualy SPOKE to him! He was supposed to be grateful that he was in a good town with college looming, and that was that, he just had to hold all his feelings in and deal. I kept thinking, 'all you have to do is sit down and let him tell you what he's going through!' but they didn't validate his experiences. Hehe, frustrating. The maid, played by Ruby Dee, was quite the wise soul, as well, though towards the end, Nash does a lot of posing in well-fitting jeans, and well, I won't reveal any spoilers, but needless to say, she was reacting as I was, to him at that time!
If you're curious as to how it turns out, you'll have to see it. I feel there WERE things left unresolved, but it WAS made in 1959, so just the fact they dealt with some of those issues was a lot, I suppose.
The kitchen beckons....

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Replies:
Subject: The Seekers


Author:
Conrad
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 10:02:46 02/21/08 Thu

Just thought I'd mention an old band from my youth has a number of wonderful videos on TouTube, and that would be The Seekers. Movie people would remember them from their theme song for "Georgy Girl." Just type them in under YouTube and you'll see an incredible number of viedos of them singing their greatest hits. I'd reccommend the black-and-white ones, where they performing live, apprently on a TV show. Hearing them live, and not lipsiced, is astonishing because it gives their song a lot more quality. The live performance in the black-and-white clip of "Georgy Girl" sound a lot more lively than the recorded version.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Replies:
Subject: Need some titles!!


Author:
Judith
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 20:58:26 01/26/08 Sat

I have been trying to find the titles for three films, and I THINK at least two of them, star Robert Young. I have done a filmography search, but come up zero.
The first is set in the country, and Robert Young falls in love with a mysterious woman. She won't tell him why she can't see him, or what is wrong, but I believe we find out that her father (I think a doctor?)has been abusing her. Robert himself, wants to study to become a doctor. That's about ALL I remember of that one! Who knows, maybe Bob Osborne will stop by and set me straight!
The second, is even more blurry, and I'm not even sure if it's Robert Young. I just remember a fisherman's cabin and a stormy, bleak sea coast. It seems that someone thinks 'Robert' is crazy...and he loves the man in the cabin's daughter. There is some running on the shore, at night. How's that for a hazy description!! I must be inhaling opium while I watch movies, eh??
OK, the third is very cool!! OOH, I THINK this may have starred Roddy MacDowell!! There is a teenage boy who is sent to a small, privately-owned mental home, because of an evil fiance of his mother's or sister. The lad has found out too much about who the fiance really is, and the guy wants to get him locked up and out of the way. It's really a good film!
OK, if ANYONE has any idea what these movies are, I'd be very grateful!!

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Replies:
Subject: Waste of Time...


Author:
Judith
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 00:05:54 02/19/08 Tue

I just saw a creepy movie, the ONE time I let myself buy an IO rental on the cable. The Year of the Dog. ACK!
They called it a comedy, but 'twas depressing and weird, and Molly Shannon, whom I usualy love, was boring with the same concerned, AWW, look, on her face! The only saving thing, IMO, was Laura Dern...she's always so good...and there was a cute black woman actor who was fun. However, I didn't quite get the point of the film, and if Molly was supposed to be funny, it didn't work for me...I found myself worrying about her, and wondering where this film would careen to next! Ah well....a wasted $4.95.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Subject: Art Houses


Author:
Conrad
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 13:03:24 02/10/08 Sun

For some reason I was thinking about the specialty theaters that used to be called "Art Houses" in the old days. These were small theaters that you only found in the major cities, that catered strictly to the "artistic" crowd. In other words, they showed movies outside the Hollywood mainstream. When I was growing up, that translated as foreign films with subtitles, (like the works of Fellini and Bergman) though occasionally an exceptional British film might be included.

This was just about the only way people here in the USA got to see such movies, as they were never shown on TV. (Foreign films tended to be sexier and more frank in dealing with human attitudes than American films.) I don't think films like "The Seven Samurai" would ever have been seen by the American public if not for Art Houses.

The concession stands were also different in the Art Houses of old. Instead of popcorn and candy they served steaming hot coffee instead.

The ironic thing about all this was that mainstream movie directors attended Art Houses on a regular basis and gradually worked more and more foreign attitudes into their own films. Sometimes they even remade some foreign films for American audiences (Best example being "The Magnificent Seven," which was a remake of "Seven Samurai.")

With more American movies featuring mature content, and the rise of the cable TV/video age, Art Houses started to change. Today, they either feature revivals of classic films, either foreign or domestic, or they cater to independently made American films (or "indies" as I think they're called). Recently, the original Japanese version of "Godzilla" had a successful run almost exclusively through art houses. And let's not forget "The Blair Witch Project," which started out in Art Houses then branched out to the mainstream. (When I first saw that film in the only Art House in the area, the tiny theater wasn't prepared for the overflow crowds, something they weren't accustomed to.) So where once the Art Houses were considered a "snob thing" they're now mainstreamed in their own way.

Anybody got any Art House stories of their own to tell?

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Replies:
Subject: 70s Horror


Author:
Kimmie
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 04:15:39 01/22/08 Tue

Lately I have been watching all those movies my parents would not let me watch.....catching up on my favorite era. I've seen Let's Scare Jessica to Death, See No Evil, Alice, Sweet Alice, and Full Circle (The Haunting of Julia). Two of these starred Mia Farrow, who just has this way of being scared on film!

Alice, Sweet Alice was really the one that I was laughing at a little...the over-the-top portrayals of the Catholics in that movie just cracked me up. Brooke Shields was like 9, and totally gorgeous in this movie with her short part.

Let's Scare Jessica to Death was not really even scary to me, it was slow and boring....and just nutty and 70s all the way.

The best of the 4 had to be Full Circle. It was really haunting and the ending scene is one that will stay with you a while.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Replies:
Subject: Testing...


Author:
me
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 22:08:24 12/10/07 Mon

http://www.elfyourself.com/?id=1295998015

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Replies:
Subject: French Kiss


Author:
Lorrie (Silly!)
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 12:10:53 01/21/08 Mon

I must admit I'm not much of a classic movie buff although I do love the old Bette Davis movies....especially "Whatever happened to Baby Jane?" I think she was an amazing actress, not only can she scare the hell out of you with her expressions but she can move you to tears in seconds.
The movie that I just love and can't ever get enough of is "French Kiss" with Meg Ryan, Kevin Kline and Timothy Hutton. My favorite scene is where Kate (Meg)is on the train eating all different kinds of French cheese, she's all happy looking out of the window enjoying the scenery taking one bite after another. Then the scene changes and they show her holding her stomach with an awful look on her face, she looks like she's going to be sick. She says "oh no, here it comes....the mucus is coating the walls of my intestines....oh no, it's here....LACTOSE INTOLERANCE!" Every single time I watch it I cry from laughing so hard.
Just wanted to share that!!

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Replies:
Subject: Ralph Bellamy??


Author:
Judith
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 10:24:20 01/18/08 Fri

Who knew?! I often see the great farcical comedy (is that redundant?) The Awful Truth, on TCM. Irene Dunne and Cary Grant play off of one another, brilliantly! But there is a handsome, cornball of a hotel neighbor...quite strapping and tall, with lovely blonde hair, and he kept looking so familiar to Dad and I. Then it hit me, it is Ralph Bellamy!! I had only known him as an older actor, and he didn't age as well as his younger looks promised. I knew him as an older actor...he played a lot of doctor roles and senators, or ruthless businessmen. So how funny was it, to see him acting like a corny, bumpkinesque (reallee, bumpkinesque?? ha!) Oklahoman oil man. Here he is in this funny film!



By the way, Irene does the greatest scene, when attempting to chase away a suitor's family, where she plays Cary's floozy sister, and does a cute but brash song and dance. I'm always amazed at what a great commedian she is! I also think the movie should end right after that scene, when she and 'hubby' get into the car, laughing, and clearly loving and admiring one another...I would have said "CUT! It's a wrap!", right then!

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Replies:
Subject: Future of Movies?


Author:
Conrad
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 09:58:55 01/08/08 Tue

I don't know if anyone noticed it or not, but the biggest movie money makers so far this year are all special effects films. (I Am Legend, Alvin and the Chipmunks and National Treasure 2.) Now, no one is a bigger fan of special effects than yours truly, but I'm also a long time movie buff and I worry a little that we're losing the true art of film making these days.

Since the "Star Wars" revolution began in the 1970s, special effects have dominated the screen increasingly year after year. And with good reason; they're consistent money makers. (I include horror films in this category too, because they rely heavily on special effects.) Even some films that aren't fantasy, sci-fi or horror depend on elaborate special effects. ("300" for example, or comedies like the "Nutty Professor" films.)

It must be very difficult to get financing for movies done the old fashioned way, where you just hired some actors, made a few sets and photographed scenes "in camera." The closest we have to that now are romantic comedies, and they're a hit-and-miss business, some make money and others just disappear after a few weeks.

Under the current system, it would difficult if not impossible to make films like they did in the old days; say, like "The Miracle Worker," or the Spencer Tracy-Kathleen Hepburn comedies, or "I Remember Mama." Such films depended on superb acting to be successful, but today all you need are effects and the performers are increasingly less important.

Which brings another point: the special effects movies have not been kind to actors. They've produced only a handful of genuine "stars" in the traditional Hollywood sense, and all of them male: Harrison Ford, Orlando Bloom and currently Will Smith. But you'll notice that everyone else associated with special effects have dropped out of sight. All the other performers associated with "Star Wars" either went into obscurity or became typecast. And when have you ever heard of the "Jurassic Park" performers in a major film?

Will Smith himself has shrewdly managed to diversify his career beyond all the special effects movies he's normally associated with, including his Academy Award nominated performance in "Ali." But you'll notice that Ford and Bloom 's efforts to get out of the special effects rut have been hit-and-miss at best. I don't know what the future holds for the movie business, but there's another heavily-touted special effects movie coming up this month ("Cloverfield"). So we'll have to wait and see if the movie business will continue along these lines.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Replies:
Subject: Meet Me In St. Louis!


Author:
Judith
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 20:29:58 12/16/07 Sun

One of my all-time favourite films!!! I watched once again, and this time (after having been somewhat Addison's ill, the past few days) sniffled into a kleenex, the entire second half of the movie! Sometimes we get more sentimental than others...especially during the holidays.
Judy Garland is stellar in this, as is little Margaret O'Brien. (gotta love this little thing with a touch of the morbid nature...some of her dolls are 'dead dolls'..)This is one of those films where each scene is 'my favourite'. To describe a few touching scenes, the boy next door isn't sure how to show his affection for Judy, and so they go from gas light to gas light, intimately turning each one off. Then there is the crooning duet between the mother and father, who's names I should know, but you know...I tend to let the movie wash over me, rather than dwell on names...that's in a video on the header, here.
Then of course, Judy singing a very sad, Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas to an even sadder O'Brien...Oh, and the wise Grandfather, escorting a dateless Judy to the dance, her last dance in St. Louis. Not sure who he was, but he cut a dapper figure in his tux!
The movie was only partly set during Christmas, yet I would recommend it heartily (hehe)to anyone wishing for a bit of poignant family warmth...perhaps one reason it evoked my emotions so,is that our family has changed so...we've lost the heartbeat of the clan, which was Mom, and well, those carols by the piano are gone (along with the piano!) and things are just different. It happens...sigh, someone stop me, please...=0

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Replies:
Subject: I Remember Mama


Author:
Judith
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 15:58:54 12/28/07 Fri

Carolee and I watched this on TCM, last night. She hadn't seen it before, and I had seen it, numerous times, but I never stop enjoying it. I do agree with Bob Osborne, that Mama was perhaps Irene Dunn's finest role. In fact, many times while watching, I forget that it is she...without much make-up, and with only a well-done Norwegian accent and her hair in braids, she truly became another person. This film is no colourful adventure, or exciting time, accept perhaps in the character of Uncle Chris, an alchoholic, unpredictably loud man with a heart of gold, or the scene where the teenage son is searching for a place to be sick, after his first pipe smoke, while little Dagmar walks in carrying a pile of puppies, and much ado happening all at once!
The rest is a quiet, poignant stroll through the lives of this Norwegian family, trying to make a go of it, in 1900 San Francisco (that line should have come first...haha) My absolute best scene...well I must set it up. (and if you want to see this for the first time, don't read on!!) The teenage girl asks Mama, when may I drink coffee (it was quite the ritual with the parents) and Mama says, your Father and I will know when you are grown up enough. Well, a sort of Gift of the Magi (but not quite) scenario occurs, and the teen (who's name I should know, but again...I'll look later!) learns a valuable lesson in what is important in life, and is in an emotional state. You see father look thoughtful, and his eye goes to the coffee cups...he rises slowly, and goes over to get the coffee pot, while Mama looks at him, first a bit shocked and surprised, and then, in pleased agreement. (see what I mean...this sounds so...bland in a way...but all those emotions washed like waves of light over Irene's face...superb acting.) The daughter still has her head down, as Dad pours a small amount into her cup...Mama motions, that is enough, and empties the remaining contents of the creamer, to fill it up...and they pass it to a very overwhelmed child. That's the emotional straw (even though a GOOD emotion) that breaks her, and after maybe one sip, she runs out of the room, in tears. Papa says, "And she is the dramatic one." Is good!

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Replies:
Subject: Has-been Heroes


Author:
Conrad
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 09:29:39 12/26/07 Wed

With the New Year coming up, thought I'd bring up some of the movie fantasy heroes of yesteryear who've either been forgotten or shoved off to the side. There are some heroes who have incredible staying power (Superman, for example) but there are others that are household names for a long time and then just fade away. I'm going to list a few I remember and then ask other people to add other has-been heroes to the list:

1. Rin-Tin-Tin: When I was growing up, there were two movie/TV superdogs, Lassie the collie and Rin-Tin-Tin, a fearless German shepherd. (At least that's what I think he was; it's hard to remember.) But while Lassie is still a household name, no younger people have heard of Rin-Tin-Tin for decades. I'm inclined to think it's because his movies and his old TV show went out of print. I've only seen one of his films, "The Return of Rin-Tin-Tin" for sale as a DVD, and you never see his fifties-era TV show for sale anywhere.

2. Jungle Jim--When Johnny Weismuller became too old to play Tarzan, he became Jungle Jim, a fearless guide in darkest Africa, who he played in the movies and television. Once again, it looks like all those old films and shows have been out of print for decades.

3. Sheena, Queen of the Jungle--The only reason people remember her is the movie made sometime in the 1980s; but the older films are nowhere to be found. However, I did find one DVD of the 1950s Sheena TV show, but the print was really atrocious.

4. Robocop: The eighties are almost a "golden age" of movie heroes who were very popular in their day but who've lost their luster over the years. While people still remember the name Robocop, there hasn't been a new film or TV show of him in years.

5. Ghostbusters: Despite the popularity of its classic theme song, this is another monster hit of the eighties that has failed to stand the test of time. Though it spawned an incredibly successful cartoon series and one sequel, the lovable, laid back franchise failed to last into the high powered nineties. But with other eighties heroes making comebacks through special effects movies and cartoons (The Transformers, Ninja Turtles) maybe we'll the Ghostbusters again someday.

Anybody have has-been heroes of their own to share?

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Replies:
Subject: Christmas or Winter Holiday Movies


Author:
Judith
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 09:36:13 12/19/07 Wed

What is your favourite??

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Replies:
Subject: Mexican Holiday Movies


Author:
Conrad
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 09:40:05 12/14/07 Fri

For over a week I've had massive computer problems--it only works when it wants to work. But while it is working, I'd like to put in an article about Christmas and Holiday films made south of the border.

In the early 1960s Mexican film makers exported a number of dubbed holiday films for kiddy matinees. Most of them are forgotten now, but at least a few of them are available on DVD.

I have a copy of the Mexican "Santa Claus" (1959, released to the States in 1960) which focuses on St. Nick's adventures in Mexico City. But the most famous and popular of the Mexican children's films was the "Little Red Riding Hood" series, which also premiered in 1960 with "La Caperucita Roja" (Little Red Riding Hood). This movie was so popular it spawned a series of sequels, including "Little Read Riding Hood and her Friends" and "Little Red Riding Hood vs the Monsters," in which she and her pals battle Frankenstein and a host of other creatures. In this series she and the big bad Wolf became friends and allies, taking on any monsters that dared challenge them.

There were also Mexican movies like "The Seven Dwarfs to the Rescue" and others that elaborated on classic fairy tales. It's very hard finding them today, and the best bet is going to specialty DVD stores.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Replies:
Subject: Sorry this isnt about movies but...


Author:
Ang
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 11:26:22 12/01/07 Sat

Why is it that I cant get a decaf coffee? Why is it that after I order I inevitably watch the guy behind the counter walk over and grab the regular pot of coffee and pour it? Is it really that hard? Someone make me understand.
Sorry... I just needed to say that.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Replies:
Subject: Who shall I feature on the header???


Author:
Judith
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 15:34:09 11/09/07 Fri

....when I take the spookies down?? Any ideas?

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Replies:
Subject: Spiderman 3


Author:
Conrad
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 06:51:37 11/24/07 Sat

On Thanksgiving Day, I let my boys watch the Lions lose their football game, while I instead watched the DVD of "Spiderman 3". As you may recall from a previous post, I reviewed the first Spidey movies long ago, and had some quibbles with them. I still have one quibble with the new one, but on the whole I give "Spiderman 3" a thumbs up.

It is in my mind the closest to the Spiderman comics I read in my youth; and it also has the strongest plot of all three Spidey movies. It's not just fighting the bad guys. There's some real "angst" between the characters that I felt was missing in the first two movies. And this was keeping with one theme that ran through the older comics, how being a superhero can gum up the hero's personal life, especially his love life. And the acting has gotten better; the performers (especially Toby Maguire) seem much more comfortable in their roles. I felt there was an awkwardness in their original performances that has smoothed out in this one. And I'm glad the filmakers are finally putting some confidence into the Spiderman/Peter Parker character. He was way too much of a doormat in the second movie. Also enjoyed them putting some musical numbers in the third film--made it feel like an old fashioned movie that way, and I think everyone who know me understands how "nostalgic" I can get.

But now for my one gripe; the characters of Peter Parker (Spiderman's true identity) and his girlfriend Mary Jane are still not the way the were in the comics. In the comic books, Parker was a lovable, wisecracking smart aleck. Mary Jane was a party girl. They were a "fun" couple. When in the world are the movie makers ever going to bring that "fun" element into the movies?

One of the big reasons the Spiderman comics were so successful was because of the comedy; amidst all the "angst" the characters went through, the tension was always migled with laughs. In the movies, it's the supporting characters who provide comedy relief. I haven't read comics for decades, so I don't know what changes have come over Spiderman. But in the old days, one element that made Spidey so popular were the jokes. I'm hoping that if they make another film they'll make the next one an action comedy. (It would also get away from Mary Jane having to be a "damsel in distress" in every film.) That's one movie I'd really like to see!

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Subject: OK....


Author:
Judith
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 10:37:00 11/14/07 Wed

I must've gone completely insane, because the posting font looks larger, to me!!

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Replies:
Subject: The Wilhelm Scream


Author:
Conrad
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 08:40:01 11/08/07 Thu

I thought I'd seen everything in the movie business, but I cannot believe the latest fad. Believe it or not, recently there's been a "cult" following grown up around (now get this) a movie sound effect! Not only that, a sound effect that's been around since 1951! There's even been songs written about it and a rock band formed in its name! I kid you not. It's called Tne Wilhelm Scream.

The Wilhelm Scream is a short, shrill scream first used in 1951, and has been passed around the Hollywood studios for years. If you've ever seen the movie "Them," it's the scream James Whitmore gives out when he's crushed by the giant ant. Apparently its real claim to fame was its extensive use in all the "Star Wars" movies, where it crops up over and over and over again. It's also been used in the Indiana Jones movies too. (In "Temple of Doom," it's the scream Indiana Jones lets out in the first scene, when he's sent sliding across a ballroom floor on a serving cart and runs into a dining table.)

The only thing close to this fad in my generation was the famous Tarzan yell, which every young boy worth his salt knew from heart. But this Wilhem Scream is just unbelieveabl! Just go to YouYube and type in "The Wilhelm Scream" under search and you'll find plenty of videos about it.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Replies:
Subject: Rondo Hatton


Author:
Conrad
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 14:56:58 11/01/07 Thu

Halloween is over, but I still want to do one more scray movie piece, but not the review of a single film this time. Instead I want to call attention to one actor who is almost forgotten today--a performer who actually used his appearance to become a horror star: Rondo Hatton.

I'm sure the name isn't familiar to most people reading this post. In fact, I have no idea where you can find the majority of his most well known work. I only know of one DVD featuring him, "Pearl of Death" (1944) which was part of the Basil Rathbone Sherlock Holmes DVD box set brought out some years ago. This is generally considered his best film, and in fact is the one that made him a star.

Rondo Hatton was a popular football star in his high school and later a veteran of World War One, in which he was gassed in combat. It's been speculated that the gas attack was the reason he later suffered from acromegaly, a disease that distorts the face. (Though not the same, or as bad, as the Proteus Syndrome, the Elephant Man's disease.)

In the late 1930s and early 1940s he turned to Hollywood, which exploited his looks in villianous roles. He didn't hit it big until the above mentioned Sherlock Holmes film, in which he played the film's villian, known as "The Creeper." He'd subsequently play the Creeper in loosely connected sequels, "House of Horrors" and "The Brute Man," making him the last of the Universal "monster" stars. In 1946, the year he passed away, Universal teamed the two favorite Sherlock Holmes villians, Rondo Hatton and Gale Sondegaard, the "Spider Woman," in a non-Holmes film, "The Spider Woman Strikes Back."

I saw these films on television back in my youth, but I've never seen them on VHS or DVD. If they're available anywhere, I don't know where they can be found. There can be no doubt that Hatton was exploited for his facial handicap, yet he managed to leave behind a remarkable film legacy. There's even an organization that for the last five years has given out the Rondo Hatton Classic Horror Awards (known as Rondos) in his honor. Here's the link to it:

http://classichorrorfilmboard.com/rondos/rondos.html

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Replies:
Subject: Hi Mom


Author:
Laura
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 15:49:40 10/30/07 Tue

Hi mom, nice page. Very spookey. Diana and I are going to see The Nightmare Before Christmas in 3-D if we can get a puppy sitter. Have a Happy Halloween!

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Replies:
Subject: Anyone seen Welle's (and Kafka's!) Trial??


Author:
Judith
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 23:08:57 10/27/07 Sat

Uhhh...never knew they made a film of Franz Kafka's, Trial. Can't say much now, I'm still lost in the nightmarish labyrinth!! My mind needs to adjust...

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Subject: Day of the Triffids


Author:
Conrad
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 08:56:54 10/23/07 Tue

Over the weekend I heard on an Internet radio station a full broadcast of the the 1957 BBC radio adaptation of "Day of the Triffids," based on the famous 1951 book by John Wyndham. This book is one of the top ten influential novels in science fiction, and put Wyndham right up there with H.G.Wells and Arthue C. Clarke. It was very prophetic in it's day, predicting bioengineered crops (a controversial subject today)and armed satellites circling the globe, which in 1951 was just a fantasy.

Yet it has only been filmed for movies once, in a 1962 British film starring Howard Keel, former star of 1950s musicals like "Annie Get Your Gun," "Seven Brides for Seven Brothers" and "Kismet." I think it's safe to say most people today are only familiar with the film version, which is vastly different from the novel. So I thought I'd make this movie my next Halloween scary movie review, and point out the differences between book and movie. Both have the same theme: giant walking plants taking over the world after most of the human race has been blinded by flashing lights in the sky.

1. In the movie, there are two seperate stories told with different characters; one centers around the adventures of Howard Keel as the hero, Bill Masen. The other involves a young couple stranded in a lighthouse on a small island. In the book, only Bill Masen's adventures are told, and the young couple aren't in the story at all.

2. In the movie, the triffids are alien plants from outer space. In the book, they are man-made monsters, developed to provide the world with a superior form of vegetable oil. Likewise, in the film the flashing lights in the sky are meteorites that bring the triffids to earth. In the book, it was the armed satellites circling the globe that blew up due to some sort of accident.

3. In the book, Bill Masen is a British "farmer" of the triffids. In the movie he's an American merchant marine sailor.

4. The character of a small girl, Susan, is a supporting character in the book who doesn't get into the story until the last half of the novel. In the movie, she survives a train wreck and meets up with Bill. They become traveling companions, sharing their adventures togetherm as they battle or run from the man eating plants. Likewise, Bill finds a love interest in a young lady he meets in France, and she joins them in their trek across Europe looking for civilization. In the book, the heroine is a young British woman, Josella, who before the castrophe was the author of scandalous sex novels.

6. In the movie, the plants are defeated and the world is saved. In the book, the triffids take over most of the world and the human race retreats to islands off the coast of the England, where they start their own new civilization.

I'll admit I've always enjoyed the movie, and in fact it was very successful in 1962. It has that certain charm that a lot of the old monster movies have. Lovers of the book always find the movie disappointing, in part because it carefully avoids all the controversial social commentary in Wyndham's novel--including what reads like an endorsement of polygamy! But there was also a BBC television adaptaion of the novel in 1981, that's rarely seen here in the USA, and with good reason. Since Dertoit is across the river from Canada, I saw it on a Canadian TV station some years ago, and it was a dreadful bore. There are some books that if you film them page by page they come across as yawn-inspiring.

far as the movie's defects go, the special effects are the primitive type you'd see in films of today. And the movie seems aimed at young children, which is no doubt why Susan was made a major character in the film, and some scenes are shown from her point of view. (At the time it was no secret that the biggest audience for science fiction movies were young kids.) Nevertheless I reccommend it as a strictly fun picture for a relaxing Saturday afternoon.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Replies:
Subject: Saw some goodies!


Author:
Judith
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 11:43:07 10/11/07 Thu

So I have seen a few old faves in the spooky genre, lately. I LOVE Val Lewton, so HAD to see The Cat People, once again. Simone Simone is awesome in that! (I need to write more, when I have time!) I Walk With the Zombies, another good one...that tall, thin zombie who just stands and stares, whoa, puts the chill in my bones!!
Then Bobbo Osborne aired one, also directed by Jacques Tourneur, who directed Lewton's films...Curse of the Demon. I completely agree with Bob, when he suggests that this film would have been on the ilk with the Lewton films, and much more scary, had it been left as Jacques wanted it. But no, a 'real', rather than suggested, monster was put in, at the last minute....well, I'm in a hurry, so I've copied a review explaining it, below. Obviously, I disagree strongly, with the author. I DO love many of the monster movies, esp. American, from the 50's...but this dark, Brit film, IMO needed that uncertain element of aprehension and suspense...and imagination.

"Curse of the Demon was directed by Jacques Tourneur, the same guy who made the 1942 version of Cat People. It is my understanding that he had wanted this movie to be similarly ambiguous; the audience was supposed to be left wondering whether Karswell was really a warlock, or whether he was simply a man who well understood the power of suggestion. Tourneur was prevented from making the movie he and the screenwriter really wanted, however, when the film’s producer, Hal S. Chester, stepped in and said, “Hey, listen, this is 1957-- we need to put a monster in this movie, understand?” If that story is true, then this may be the only example in history of a movie that was saved by the intervention of a profit-hungry producer into the director’s business. I have always believed, and probably always will believe, that a horror movie needs to show the audience something at some point-- sooner or later, you’ve got to turn the card in the hole face up. And this demon, which apparently was not supposed to have been in the movie at all, is easily one of the five coolest monsters of the entire decade.."
http://www.1000misspenthours.com/reviews/reviewsa-d/curseofthedemon.htm

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Replies:
Subject: Deborah Kerr


Author:
Judith
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 17:27:52 10/19/07 Fri

Does anyone have a favorite Deborah film...or two? I have many, but my all-time faves, and The Night of the Iguana, where she plays a traveling portrait artist, a virginal one, at that, traveling with her elderly poet grandfather. She meets up with the likes of a defrocked and drunken Richard Burton, and a hot, steamy and very frustrated, Ava Gardener, in a remote, equally steamy, Mexican 'resort' (more like lodging) Lessons in the acceptance of themselves, are learned.
Need I say, The King and I?? She and Yul Brenner were stellar! I have more, but I'll leave it at that, for now.
We lost a great one.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Replies:
Subject: Hope the text is readable!


Author:
Judith
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 22:39:47 10/14/07 Sun

I had a great black BG with white bats all over, loved it, but every text colour I tried, didn't cut it. I hope this will do for now...just HAD to dress it up for the holiday!!

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Subject: The Celluloid Closet


Author:
Judith
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 11:44:12 10/14/07 Sun

I watched this documentary on the LOGO channel, about how homosexuality has been portrayed in film, down through the years. I guess I was always vaguely aware of a dark aspect, especially while viewing those two lesbian movies about a girls' boarding school, These Three, and later, The Children's Hour. It seemed that all must be lost, if a character is found to be gay...punishment, degradation, suicide! All these thoughts were gelled and illustrated in this doc.
Oddly enough, and we have seen this with other sexual or controversial subjects, silent film, and some before the Hollywood Code, did at times portray love and tenderness between same sex couples. But afterwards, some of the hardest, cruelest films came out! Violence prevailed, and homosexuals were victims.
Later still, there was a turn, and gays were portrayed as the victimizers, hunting down their prey in dark allys...lurking in the shadows....corrupting innocent souls. What really pulled at my heart, was hearing how those images affected gay teens, who were attempting to come to terms with who they are. A couple of gay men spoke of seeing those dark, evil looking clubs and bars...and seeing how the gay lifestyle most always lead to suicide..and thinking, that is what my life will be like! What other models were out there, for them to see?
Having a daughter who is also a lesbian, I have always noted how she didn't have a lot of movies to relate to, as the romantic leads were always male and female.But I'd never realized (because it didn't affect me) how negative and how damaging, so many movies have been, in affecting a young person's (or any age, for that matter) self-image.
This film is important, because it points out what was so wrong in the past, and hopefully, we can keep making progress, portraying REAL people, who love and have tenderness for one another.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Subject: Spanish Language Dracula


Author:
Conrad
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 17:49:42 10/06/07 Sat

Most people don't know there were two versions of "Dracula" made in 1931. One was the Bela Lugosi version we all know so well, the other was the Spanish language version--both made by Universal Studios.

Films had switched to "talkies," and most studios did two different versions of their major films, one in English, and the other in Spanish for the Latino market. In the case of "Dracula," the Bela Lugosi version was filmed during the day, while the Spanish language version was done at night on the same sets but with a Latino cast.

Seeing it today, it's remarkable how "modern" looking the Spanish language version appears. It's almost like a film made yesterday, with the same style, pacing and emotional acting of a film made today. The camera movement is much more lively, the special effects are more effective and the acting is much better. There's more dialog given to minor characters, and more humor.

Things that are only spoken of in the Lugosi version are shown in the Spanish version. When they speak of bites on the neck, in the Spanish movie you see the bites in close-up, for example. If someone speaks of bent steel bars, you see those bent steel bars. What's more, some things that aren't clear in the English "Dracula" make more sense in the Spanish version. In Lugosi's "Dracula," it's not clear what Renfield is doing to help Dracula in the sanitarium. In the Spanish movie, it's shown how Renfield's antics divert attention from Dracula so he can sneak into the hospital.

But there's one flaw that mars the Spanish "Dracula" badly. The two leads (Dracula and Renfield) simply aren't scary compared to Bela Lugosi and Dwight Fry in the English Dracula. Bela Lugosi had the uncanny ability to look supernatural just by standing still in the fog. The scene where he shatters the mirror box and glares with absolute hate in his eyes is frightening in its simplicity. Like one of the other actors says, "Did you see his eyes? Like a wild animal." Likewise, with all his babbling, grinning and extravagent gestures, Renfield as played by Fry could be scary in his madness. The scene where he's staring up from the ship's hold laughing strangely is a masterpiece of restrained terror.

But since the acting was more naturalistic in the Spanish "Dracula," the Count as played by Carlos Villar (aka Villarias) just doesn't have the same spooky quality as Lugosi, though admitedly he tries hard to look that way. And Renfield, portrayed by Pablo Alverez Rubio, is given more dialog and his speeches actually get tiresome at times.

The real surprise in the film is the heroine, called "Eva" in the Spanish version rather than Minna. Lupita Tovar steals the show with her lively acting. Though on the chubby side she's remarkably voluptuous and sexy. And her performance is miles away from the restrained acting by Helen Chandler in the English version. In the scene where Eva is becoming more like a vampire, instead of acting weird or menacing, she smiles and giggles and generally acts like a teenage girl. What's more, in the English "Dracula" the girl only bends forward to bite her boyfriend before Van Helsing rushes in to stop her. In the Spanish movie, Eva rushes into her boyfriend's arms and you literally see her bite him on the neck, and with great enthusiasm too. (She clearly likes becoming a vampire!)

All in all, a very interesting if movie, and certainly the one that introduced the popular version of Dracula to audiences sounth of the border. The only way you can see it now is by purchasing the Universal Dracula DVD Box Set. Otherwise, you might find it available by itself as a VHS tape at stores that still have tapes for sale.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Replies:
Subject: Bride of the Gorilla


Author:
Conrad
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 00:21:44 10/03/07 Wed

Well, it's Halloween time again, which is a favorite time of mine for posting reviews of classic horror-monster movies. This year I'm going to concentrate on little known or obscure scary movies, some of which are considered classics, some of which are not.

One film definitely not in the classic arena, but an interesting and unusual film just the same, is "Bride of the Gorilla" from 1951. There's a backstory to this that is fascinating in itself.

Curt Siodmak was both the writer and director of "Bride of the Gorilla." He was also the screenwriter of Universal's 1941 classic "The Wolf Man." Most people don't know that in Siodmak's original script, Lon Chaney Jr.'s character was only supposed to imagine that he was turning into a werewolf. The Universal head office would have none of that, and demanded that the monster be real and not a hallucination. Ten years later, when Siodmak got into directing, he did "Bride of the Gorilla," which was essentially what "The Wolfman" would have been under the original, never-filmed script.

Seeing this movie, I think we can be glad Universal made him invent a real monster in "Wolfman." "Bride of the Gorilla" stars Raymond Burr (before his Perry Mason days) as the overseer of a plantaion somewhere in South America. He accidentally kills his boss and marries the boss' wife, thus becoming head of the plantation himself. But an old woman (similar to the Gypsey woman in "The Wolfman") slips Burr some hallucinaginic drugs, and he starts to imagine that he turns into a gorilla at night. He takes to aimlessly wandering through the jungle and generally acting bizzare for the rest of the movie.

The big flaw in this film is obviously the lack of anything supernatural. We're shown from the start what is making Burr behave like a loon, which robs the film of any suspense. So he's hallucinating--what's the big deal? One of the funniest lines in the film is when the local doctor asks Burr's wife (played by Barbara Payton) "Is your husband taking drugs?" (Something that should be obvious to anyone in the movie!)

Interestingly, Siodmak had Lon Chaney Jr. himself cast in this film, but in a supporting role as a local police detective. Chaney maganges to keep this movie from being completely boring with a fascinating performance. It's one of those roles that showed how Chaney had a wider range than most critics gave him credit for. (His small role in "High Noon" was also unforgettable.) When he did supporting roles throughout the 1950s, he could be a really good character actor.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Replies:
Subject: Actors you get confused....


Author:
Judith
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 22:15:21 09/30/07 Sun

Anyone confuse one actor for another? I just realized that I get Keir Dullea (Dave-2001 ASO) and John McMartin (Sweet Charity) mixed up. Now that I see their pictures together, I see a big difference. IMO, Keir is the more handsome. Funny how you think someone looks like another, until you see them together. BTW, BOTH are still working locally (if'n yer in the tri-state) McMartin in (Achem, Ang..) Grey Gardens, and Keir I believe narrating a play, also in the City. You just needed to know that...:-/

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Subject: Tragic story...


Author:
Angela
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 00:13:18 09/20/07 Thu

So I am a big fan of the Match Game and I set my DVR to tape it whenever it is on. I sometimes have no idea who the guests are or what makes them famous, but recently I saw a game where an actor named Jack Cassidy was on the panel. I found him kind of funny and just an interesting character all around, so I googled him and found out that he had died in a fire at his home no more than a year after that episode of Match Game had aired. I thought, how tragic! I was also sort of taken by surprise to read that he was from Richmond Hill, Queens (not far from where I live), but he seemed to speak with an english accent on the show. Confused!!!
Does anyone know anything about this actor?

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Replies:
Subject: The 1980s Entertainment Revolution


Author:
Conrad
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 23:56:48 09/10/07 Mon

I have a DVD with a commentary track where one of the commentators makes the statement, "The VCR put show business out of business."

That's a pretty sweeping statement, but the more I thought about it I began to wonder. Looking back, I think it's safe to say the home entertainment revolution of the 1980s was the single biggest influence on popular culture in that decade.

I remember commercials for the video tape machines of the time. (Which were then either Beta Max or VCR.) The big push in those commercials was that people could set the timers of the VCRs to record programs (like football games)which they might miss because they were at work. I realize many youngsters out there might not understand this, but at the time this was a really liberating concept to people. In the old days, if you missed a show, there was nothing you could do about it. I remember racing home from school to catch "Dark Shadows" in the sixties, because at that time there was no such thing as reruns of soap operas.

But now with the press of a button, the viewer had complete control of what they could see. TV Networks were no longer "big brother," dictating what people watched or when they could watch it. The ripple effects on the entertainment industry were substantial.

For one, with the growing market for video tapes, daily movie shows on TV were obsolete. In the old days, there wasn't a TV channel around that didn't have daily movie shows, often with a local host who'd talk about the movie in between breaks. There were shows like "Dialing for Dollars" where the host would give away cash prizes to viewers who called in during commercial breaks. And every station had local kiddie shows with hosts dressed as clowns or cowboys who showed reruns of old cartoons or Three Stooges movies.

All of these were put out of business by the VCR. Kids or parents could pop in movies or cartoons anytime they pleased. There was no longer a need for such shows, or the entertainers who went with them. Since the eighties, the only local personalities you've been likely to see on the tube are your resident news broadcasters. Here in Detroit, one station even did away with their local news programs for awhile.

And the movie business itself was changed forever by the home entertainment competition. Cheaply made "B" movies shifted over to made-for-video productions. The old "B" movie theaters, or "grindhouses" as they were called, became a thing of the past. They couldn't compete with the VCR. And to keep up with the competition, production values for theatrical films became steadily better and more spectacular to attract more customers. But that also meant rising ticket prices, a trend which continues to this day.

How about you folks? Can you think of other similar changes the home entertainment industry has made in our lives?

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Replies:
Subject: Radio Days!


Author:
Judith
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 22:24:32 09/09/07 Sun

I never really gave Woody Allen's, Radio Days, a chance before, maybe I was busy or something....but this time I sat down and not only watched it, but yelled out much dialogue for Dad, who won't get a hearing aid! Someone called it gentle and nostalgic, and I agree...and it surprised me. There WERE a few typical Woody sicky humor, such as the story about the baseball pitcher losing limbs, etc., but for the most part, it was the former. I loved the nostalgic decor of the family's home, and while I don't remember (thank God, there's something I don't remember!!) those radio shows, there were bits of that more innocent life that I could relate to.
I still have mixed feeling about Woody...guess we'll never know what he did or didn't do...but as a movie maker, he's a near genious! I esp. love one scene, where you're looking into a room nearest to the viewer, with I think the aunt doing something, and at the same time, you can glimpse into the kitchen (all glowy looking) and see the brother-in-law cutting meat, or what have you. I used to draw little cartoons that cracked my mom up, of a cross-section of a family's home, and all the various things, some secretive, that they were up to...this reminded me of that! It just gave me a good feeling, watching it, despite my voice-over narrative, for Dad!

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Subject: La Jetee - a short


Author:
Judith
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 18:08:41 09/03/07 Mon

This was wonderful, a film made up of still images, and only 28 minutes in length. Check it out at this IMBD page:
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0056119/
I guess you could call it romantic sci-fi. There is a very good viewer comment, at bottom of the page.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Replies:
Subject: Anyone else, as thrilled as I, that we have a James Stewart stamp!! Yea~~~


Author:
Judith
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 10:04:13 08/21/07 Tue




Artist
Drew Struzan, who was born in 1947, has been drawing and painting since he was a child. He worked his way through the Art Center College of Design in California, earning a Bachelor of Arts degree with great distinction and completing two years of graduate studies. For more than 25 years Struzan has worked at his craft.

Struzan's paintings have delighted audiences around the world for a quarter century. Whether he paints album covers, advertising, collectibles, book covers, or his famous movie posters, his strong visual design, draftsmanship, good taste, and immediately recognizable style always produce a memorable and lasting piece of art.Anyone who has seen his work will remember his paintings for E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial , Star Wars , the Indiana Jones series, the Back to the Future series, Police Academy , the Muppet movies, and Hook .

As an artist, lecturer, and teacher, Struzan is influencing a new generation of artists and collectors. Steven Spielberg says Struzan is his favorite movie artist. George Lucas collects Struzan's work, calling him the only collectible artist since World War II, while the Boston Globe called him the greatest poster artist of our day.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Replies:
Subject: Bergman's Virgin Spring


Author:
Judith
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 11:30:14 09/02/07 Sun

Anyone out there, have thoughts on the ending on this film? It was a bit of a shock to me, the spring rising from the spot where Karin lay, and more than that, Sydow's promise to build a church on the spot. It just didn't seem to fit with the rest of the 'godless' story! It didn't seem like Bergman, to me. This is a very cynical thought, but could it possibly have been Bergman's poke at Christians, where such savagery can be wrought on a young girl (and the boy, for that matter!) and yet he's willing to take all the guilt himself, and build a church for the same god he feels, allowed all this to happen?? I don't know...been looking it up, but obviously in the wrong places, because all I found is an Amazon page where they claim he felt 'obliged' to end it that way. I'm dubious...

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Replies:
Subject: Dark Crystal


Author:
Judith
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 22:20:23 08/20/07 Mon

Here they are...see the fingers, they are his!! (so to speak)

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Replies:
Subject: Famous "Unknown" Actors


Author:
Conrad
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 17:44:09 08/18/07 Sat

Not long ago I was watching a movie when I noticed an old character actor I've seen in films dozens of times over the years, but I still have no idea who he was. We've all had experiences like that, I'm sure, when we recognize performers in small or supporting roles, or even a "bit" parts, but we can't think of their names. So I've decided to celebrate all those "little guys" out there in Hollywood by naming three of the better known "second bananna" actors, and inviting others in this group to name some favorites of their own.

The first one I'll discuss, Sonny Tufts, actually developed a reputation for himself--though not exactly the kind he would have preferred. A former opera and Broadway singer, he got into the movies in the 1940s. Though his career got off to a promising start, by the 1950s he was saddled with the reputation of being the worst actor in Hollywood. Even Saturday morning cartoon shows like "Rocky and Bullwinkle" occasionally made jokes about him. Finishing his career in B movies, to this day his most well known film remains "Cat Women of the Moon." (1953) He passed away in 1970.

Hans Conried had a far more lucrative career as a supporting actor, but it was his golden voice that really earned him his bread and butter. Even if you never saw his face you'd reconize his voice as that of Snidley Whipflash from Saturday morning cartoons or as Captain Hook from the Disney version of "Peter Pan" (1953). One of the most popular voice over performers from the 1950s till his passing in 1982, he also had a reaccuring role on the TV show "Make Room for Daddy" as the character Uncle Tonoose. In movies, he was strictly small time, though he managed to get the lead in two 1950s fantasy films, "The Twonky" and "The 5,0000 Fingers of Dr. T." His acting style was remarkably similar to that of Jonathan Harris, who had the good fortune to go on to fame as "Dr.Smith" on "Lost in Space." (Harris too went on to make his living through voice overs for cartoos and commercials.)

Dick Miller, who's still alive, is probably the king of second-bananna performers. He's been around for so many years in so many movies, it's hard not to recognize this Bronx actor. Chiefly known for his roles in science fiction films, to modern audiences his best known part is as the older man in the two "Gremlins" movies who cries out: "They're Gremlins! Gremlins, just like I said they were!" or something to that effect. He only snared the lead in one 1959 film, "A Bucket of Blood," as a sculptor who kills people and turns their bodies into clay statues.
But if you look fast you catch his appearances in "The Terminator," and many other films since the 1950s.

So, what unknown-but-knowm second-bannana would you nominate for this category?

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Replies:
Subject: My banner!


Author:
Judith
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 21:42:24 08/19/07 Sun

I'd like to thank the Ravin' Maven, for my awesome banner, above! If you haven't perused her movie site yet, her link is beneath the forum...her Bijou Follies is great fun!

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Subject: HAIRSPRAY!!


Author:
Judith
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 22:16:50 08/13/07 Mon

OK...Here I am talking about Ingmar Bergman, and in the same breath, say that I saw Hairspray! I'm all over the place! Has anyone seen it? How did you like it, and how do you think it compared with the Ricki Lake/Divine original? I feel that the original movie was better, over-all...but the new one is more of a musical, and was soooo much FUN to see in the theatre. As for Divine vs. Travolta, I liked Divine better...John's face appliance was a bit unbelievable. But still, he was so darn light on his feet, so feminine, as he kicked up his heels and did his little dances, you just have to laugh. There were times I had tears of laughter in fact...the romantic dance scene between Walken and Travolta...OMG! LOVED Walken, he's too cool/odd. We were also very amazed that Nikki could dance so well, seeing as her arms and legs are so short...lots of exuberance, i guess!
Now, I REALLEE shouldn't date myself so much, but well I remember the last vestiges of segregation, esp. when I'd visit relatives in Florida. Carolee and I would sneak over to the radio, and find the 'coloured' station, because they played really cool music, like we never heard. My uncle or grandmom would catch us and squeal to our folks..."They're listening to the coloured station!!" I guess something might 'rub off', just by listening...?! And so, in many ways care and I related to things that our younger girls couldn't. In fact, Carolee was ON Bandstand, back in the day!!

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Replies:
Subject: Goldie Hawn


Author:
Miss Julie
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 16:46:54 07/12/07 Thu

Watching Cactus Flower right now...almost over. Such a cutesy film:) Goldie Hawn sure has aged well...still as cute as ever. I hope to age like her...haha!

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Replies:
Subject: Love it...love it...love it!


Author:
Miss Julie
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 21:11:39 07/08/07 Sun

Hi Judi... love the new look as usual! BTW, I emailed you... I'll be in CT in a few days:) Going to see a band play at Foxwoods Resort.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Replies:
Subject: Two Remakes


Author:
Conrad
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 12:06:27 07/29/07 Sun

From watching Real Player, I saw that coming soon sometime this year there's two more remakes of a couple of old movie chestnuts, both based on books.

The one that shows the most promise is "I Am Legend," starring Will Smith as "The Last Man on Earth," which was the title of the original 1964 film starring Vincent Price in the title role. That was one of the creepiest films of the early sixties, in which Price lives alone in a world overrun by vampires. It was a direct influence on "Night of the Living Dead," in that the vampires were portrayed as pale, unkempt, staggering zombies.

"Last Man" was remade in 1971 as "The Omega Man," with Charleton Heston as a gun-wielding "last man," and the mindless vampires turned into cunning mutants of some sort, alergic to sunlight. Both these films are adaptations of a very popular book, "I Am Legend," by science fiction writer Richard Matheson (best known for "The Incredible Shrinking Man," which was also the basis for a movie.)

Of the two, the Vincent Price version is the most faithful to the novel, though it suffered from cheap production values. The new version featuring Will Smith appears to have rich and spectacular looking production values, to judge from the trailer. But it still has the same publicity line, which I believe was used for both earlier movies: "The last man on earth is not alone!"

The second remake coming soon is one I doubt anyone is goint to rush to the theaters for: "The Invasion." Watching the trailer it didn't take long to realize this is yet another version of "Invasion of the Body Snatchers." The giveaway is how characters in the new trailer use dialog straight out of the other older movies. "Invasion of the Body Snatchers" has been filmed at least three times before, and this new one doesn't seem to offer anything new.

It appears that a woman is the protagonist in this one, trying to protect her child, but even that's not new. A teenage girl was the heroine in the third remake, (1993) and she was trying to protect her kid brother. So I just don't see why they'd dredge this up again. No matter how good the production values are, they won't hide the fact this is a plot just about every moviegoer knows by heart.

All the "Body Snatcher" movies are based on the novel by the late Jack Finney, and it to the general public it remains his best known work, though he also did a critically acclaimed time travel novel in 1970, "Time and Again."

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Replies:
Subject: Watching Fred and Ginger all night!


Author:
Judith
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 21:11:19 07/19/07 Thu

I never tire of their exuberance...finesse...style~



[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Replies:
Subject: I found an interesting online movies links!!!


Author:
tracy Paker
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 21:05:29 08/07/07 Tue

Hey, following is a free link to watch movies online http://www.yourglobaltv.com/moviesonline/ . Here you can find movies of all types from many nations such as: Viet nam, Singapore, USA, China, etc… I have enjoyed myself much with it and wanna share with you now. check it out

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Subject: Two actors


Author:
James
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 21:57:29 05/13/07 Sun

There are two actors who have had terrible lives that I find facinating.
Veronica Lake and Colin Clive.
I read about them a few weeks ago and was saddened to read of their fates.
Popular actors from the 1930's and 40's tossed into booze bottles.

How do people who have such celebrity get themselves into a mess. It still happens today.

There have been numerous others but I was just surprised to read of them recently.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Replies:
Subject: Novak 'n' Kovacs


Author:
Judith
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 09:33:43 07/21/07 Sat

I don't usually like to rely on other's reviews of a fave movie, but it's too lovely and breezy outside, today, to do it myself. Also, Sanjek's words reflect how I feel about this film. Just wanted to share it...I love Quine's work; Bell, Book and Candle, being another of his directing. The movie just seems to contain the essence of the late '50's, early '60's. (not to mention, I like Ernie Kovacs!) Anyone have other favourites from that era?


STRANGERS WHEN WE MEET
Director: Richard Quine
Cast: Kirk Douglas, Kim Novak, Ernie Kovacs, Barbara Rush
(Columbia, 1960/2005) Rated: Unrated
DVD release date: 22 February 2005
by David Sanjek


:. e-mail this article
:. print this article
:. comment on this article

Sad Suburbanites

Strangers When We Meet is a melodramatic tale of extramarital unhappiness amongst fast-track suburbanites. Spirited architect Larry (Kirk Douglas) Larry has been hired by novelist Roger Alter (played by the late television comic Ernie Kovacs in a rare dramatic role) to build him a house befitting his self-image as a convention-breaking malcontent. In the process, Larry chances upon Maggie (Kim Novak), whom he knows vaguely because their young sons attend the same school, and invites her to join him at the worksite.

We are aware at this point that Maggie has cheated on her husband before, that her husband is an affable but not demonstrable individual, and that Larry's wife, Eve (Barbara Rush), vigorously encourages him to put the material needs of her and their two children ahead of any off-the-wall experimentation in his profession. And so the clandestine relationship blossoms, with potentially soapy aspects mitigated as Larry is not so much fleeing an unappreciated spouse as dipping in fresh waters, anxious about the stigma attached to spurning the allure of success.

The sympathetic treatment of the lead characters is enhanced by director Richard Quine's judicious use of the widescreen frame, setting most shots at a comfortable distance from the characters and cutting to close-ups only at key moments in the plot. Such remove creates the impression that Larry and Maggie are only barely comfortable in their environment, forever tempted by dissatisfaction. It also reinforces a mood of melancholy, a rueful conviction that fine belongings and lavish residences cannot compensate for emotional malnourishment.

Such attention to detail is typical of Quine's best work. A child actor in the 1930s and '40s, he turned to the other side of the camera in the late '40s, and hit his stride as a contract director with Columbia throughout the next decade, moving ably from film noir (Pushover [1954]), to musicals (My Sister Eileen [1955]), to comedy (Operation Mad Ball [1957]). During the 1960s, his budgets rose, but his reputation diminished as his movies' antic edge gave way to mainstream melodrama. Cast adrift, like many of his peers, by the erosion of the studio system, Quine worked only intermittently in the '70s, his last credit being a debacle from the tail-spinning final period of Peter Sellers' career, a send-up of the swashbuckler The Prisoner of Zenda (1979) that sank like a lead balloon. Ten years later, having suffered from fits of depression, Quine committed suicide, made all the more upsetting by the contrast with the glow and glamour of his best films.

Among these are the two he made with Novak (best known as the object of Jimmy Stewart's obsession in Vertigo [1958]). He marshals with equal skill her shy, sometimes deadpan, yet nonetheless steamy persona (Raymond Durgnat memorably describes her, in Films and Feelings [1967], as "a flower wrapped in the cellophane of her own provocation"). Quine's Bell, Book, and Candle (1959) paired Novak again with Stewart as a modern day witch who enchants her co-star's worldly wise book publisher. Elegantly shot and impeccably timed, it holds up as not only one of the best fantasy-tinged comedies but also more than likely an influence on the television series Bewitched.

Strangers When We Meet, at long last released on a bare-bones DVD by Columbia, offers another example of their partnership. Quine's direction makes good use of Novak's hesitancy and reserve, and also keeps Douglas's customary over-the-top persona on a low simmer. Maggie and Larry's affair takes a detour when he receives an offer to move to Hawaii and take over the design and construction of a new city in the midst of the lush island's interior. The conundrum for the architect becomes whether he wishes to sacrifice emotion for ambition, to cast aside his artistic aspirations for a forlorn and furtive relationship in a community prone to gossip.

From the grim trajectory of Quine's career, one might imagine he not only sympathized with his protagonist's plight, but also perceived this challenging narrative, adapted by Evan Hunter from his own novel, as his own shot at a kind of respectability in his chosen profession. Strangers When We Meet never allows the glossiness of its presentation to erode a very affecting and astute appraisal of the state of suburbia before its inhabitants were swept away by the volatile energies of the decade to come.

— 23 March 2005

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Replies:
Subject: Movie Theatre Candy...as a child..


Author:
Judi
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 15:18:46 04/01/07 Sun

Speaking of old neighborhod theatres...what were your most favourite candies to get, waaaaay back when?
I almost always got a Charleston Chew...for me, nothing came close to the mix of chocolate and chewy nugat. Another fave of mine, were the Junior Mints..esp. as I got older, always good for that unexpected...or was it?...kiss!
One more were Nonpareils....again, the cocolate with the white stuff!
So many childhood memories...once, a little scruffy neighbor boy, very romantically told me, that he'd gotten Jujubes for himself...because it sounded like my name. Awwwwww~~~

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Replies:
Subject: Creepy Computers


Author:
Conrad
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 21:47:41 07/03/07 Tue

Recently I bought a one-dollar DVD of the film "Paper Man," a low-budget thriller from 1971, starring Dean Stockwell as a computer whiz.

The plot has a certain relevance to today's headlines. A small group of college students cook up a scheme to operate a credit card fraud using the university's master computer. They talk Stockwell into what we would call "hacking" today, preparing a program for the computer in which he creates a false identity for an imaginary person to fool their credit card company.

This scheme works all too well, until the students involved start to get killed off one by one--and it looks like the computer is doing it! Unfortunately everything is explained away at the end with a "logical" reason, but up till then the movie is a fascinating look at the way computers were regarded in the early days of such technology.

This was the time when computers were big as a wall, made a lot of noise, and messages were printed out of them on long sheets of paper. It's amusing how the students in this film act toward these devices. For today's audiences, the funniest line in the film would be when Stockwell explains to one woman, "I'm introducing myself to the computer. It's called logging in." And she reacts as if such a concept is way over her head!

There've been numerous films with creepy computers over the years, though not as many since home computers have become commanplace in our daily lives. Let's have some fun and name here ones you remember best. I could name a few now, but I'll let the rest of take over.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Replies:
Subject: Butterfield 8


Author:
Judith
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 22:36:38 06/08/07 Fri

If anyone would like to discuss Butterfield 8, I would love to talk about this seductive and engrossing film...heart wrenching, as well!! It pulled me in, once again, tonight...the performances are superb, in my opinion, and the story sensitive and compelling....and while most of us probably haven't lived such extreme lives as the protagonists, you can't help but relate in some way, to one or more, of the characters.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Replies:
Subject: The WIcker Man


Author:
Kimmie
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 04:45:14 05/26/07 Sat

Ok, the original, I saw AFTER the new one. First off, the new one is unintentionally funny, and there's a huge internet cadre who are making lots of fun at it.....see You Tube if interested.

The original, I tried to watch with an open mind. To me, it also was humorous in parts, but that might be due to the dateness of it. The original is more like a musical, with songs, etc. But the ending is still more chilling in a lot of ways.

I'd like to see what everyone here thinks of the original Wicker Man . . . but of course comments on the new one are welcome.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Replies:
Subject: No AC today! Saw THREE great ones last night!!!


Author:
Judith
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 11:59:58 05/31/07 Thu

TCM finally had some great ones on last night....three films of W. Somerset Maugham's short stories!! he's the one who wrote, Of Human Bondage (with Leslie and Bette)and many other that went to film.
The first was titled, Quartet...Four short stories, with the surprise of Somerset himself, making comments, etc. That was met with such popularity, that they made Trio, and later, Encore, also with three of his tales. While I was not satisfied with a couple story endings, the tales were like a collection of tiny china teacups, strung together....very adoreable. I think my favourite was Sanatorium, written from his own experience as a patient, himself. Some say it lacked focus, but isn't that how a long, drawn-out sanatorium stay could feel like? I thought it was wonderful, with a very poignant end...oh, I loved them all!

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Subject: A Note and a Question....


Author:
Judith
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 09:21:40 05/30/07 Wed

Hi Guys! Just want to say that I had the AC unit put in this dining room where I am, with the PC...my ex told me I shouldn't run both at the same time...ack! That was the point of the AC? So....does anyone know...I will also ask at a Radio Shack or PC store....if there is something I can use in order to run both...some kind of power grid (that sounds good, don't know what that means) or what have you? OK, I am now going into the air~~~~good-bye~~~~~~~I'm wafting away~~~~~~~~ =]

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Subject: Happy Memorial Day weekend!


Author:
Judith
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 13:34:26 05/27/07 Sun

I hope you all have a wonderful weekend! Boy, was it HOT in Connecticut!!! Much nicer, now. This is the time to catch your John Wayne flicks!! My gosh, he's been everywhere, this week. He's not a fave of mine...but I did catch the Quiet Man for the zillionth time.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Main index ] [ Archives: 1[2]34 ]





Images by WOD
I found my pretty web jewels here



Wow! Chock FULL of all things Leslie...informative, gorgeous pictures; what fun!


Load up on popcorn and allow your eyes to adjust to the darkness..
you will find much to feast your eyes on, in this theatre of the stars!














Love the images of Bette on Lynn's site!






Vintage Romance Publishing




Contact Judith


My Care2


Me Space





[ Contact Forum Admin ]


Forum timezone: GMT-8
VF Version: 3.00b, ConfDB:
Before posting please read our privacy policy.
VoyForums(tm) is a Free Service from Voyager Info-Systems.
Copyright © 1998-2017 Voyager Info-Systems. All Rights Reserved.