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Subject: Do you know where you will spend eternity?


Author:
JacquelineDeane55
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Date Posted: 14:03:49 07/29/17 Sat

Where do you think you would spend eternity, if God forbid, you were to die later today?

I am not sending this to you to preach religion. I am asking you if you were standing before a Holy God do you think that He would have an issue with your sin if you were standing in front of a Holy God?

Because that is exactly what the Bible tells us. That a Holy God can not be in the presence of sin. So every human being that has ever lived has had the exact same problem. This sin problem. But do you also know that Jesus Christ offers all of us a free gift, the forgiveness of sin. And faith and belief is all God wants from you. So, do you believe that Jesus was the Son of God who came to earth and lived a perfect life? Do you know that God will accept Christ's perfect life and let Christ be your Advocate, so on Judgement Day God doesn't look at all the bad stuff you've done. Instead, God will look at His perfect Son when He see's you. Because Jesus and His perfection literally stand in our place.

Something like that. I would try to lay it out in the most simple terms so they know what the problem is and what the solution is and how it works.

Then in the last sentence just write a quick sentence like "there really is little difference between you and I, I am a sinner too. But I have accepted Christ's free gift of salvation and I know that I will be with God in eternity. I sincerely hope that this has helped you and I do apologize for being so forward, but I have to share this with you because I'm sure neither of us gets free gifts often. At this point, I would recommend for you a good Bible-based church that can answer any questions you have and will surround you with like-minded believers. Just Google bible church in your local area. God bless you!"

Rom 3:23 :
For all have sinned, and come short of the glory of God;

Now that you know that no one is good in God's eyes, how do we then become good? How do we become vindicated before God? The Bible teaches that we need to have Jesus' righteousness but the only way to do that is to come to Him by faith:

Rom 10:9
That if thou shalt confess with thy mouth the Lord Jesus, and shalt believe in thine heart that God hath raised him from the dead, thou shalt be saved.

Rom 10:10
For with the heart man believeth unto righteousness; and with the mouth confession is made unto salvation.

Jesus commands everyone everywhere to repent of their sins, to ask for His forgiveness, and to turn from their sins and to put their faith and trust in Him. Repenting means that you are sincerely sorry for all the bad things you have done in life and you want Jesus to change you into his holiness and righteousness.

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Subject: Awesome site!


Author:
e (happy)
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Date Posted: 20:48:29 05/16/15 Sat

Awesome site although I had hoped this was an old school BBS. :( Keep up the great work Craig. I wish you well in all your endeavors!

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Subject: When was the 'LED + CoinCell' match first spotted ?


Author:
Nik (Speaker To Cats)
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Date Posted: 15:43:40 02/20/15 Fri

Hi ! I know 'throwies', aka 'LED + 3V Coin Cell + magnet' went viral ~2006, but when was it noticed that an LED could be directly driven by a coin cell *and survive* ??

I'm writing a story set in mid-1998, and this info would be useful.

I know the 'joule thief' pump-circuit to let a 1V5 cell drive an LED first appeared in mid-1999, so too late for this.

If 'LED + Coin Cell' date is unknown or unclear, protagonist will go 'engineering' route via 'Art of Electronics' and include a series resistor...

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Subject: Review of the 5mW 445nm-450nm Blue Laser Pen (2)


Author:
The LED (and Laser) Museum (Very happy!!!)
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Date Posted: 21:09:04 04/05/14 Sat


5mW 445nm-450nm Blue Laser Pen (2), retail $29.95
Manufactured by: (Unknown) for Lilly Electronics
Last updated 04-06-14




(In reference to the small packet that I received in the mail on the afternoon of 04-04-14:
{sung like the Foreigner song "Feels Like the First Time"}


The 5mW 445nm-450nm Blue Laser Pen (2) (hereinafter, probably just called a "blue portable laser" or even just a "blue laser") is a royal blue-emitting, directly-injected diode laser. That is, it produces deep blue laser radiation directly, without the need for messy, fragile nonlinear crystals like those green laser pointers and the amberish-yellow and slightly greenish-blue ones as well. It uses a pair of AAA cells to feed its laser diode with.

This laser has a measured power output of 12mW at 445.880nm in the blue part of the spectrum.

This is the reason I call it a "portable laser" or "laser pen" on this website instead of a "pointer". Lasers designated as "pointers" must -- by US law anyway -- have a power output that does not exceed 5mW.

It comes in a handsome aluminum body with a black matte finish and brushed chrome-colored accents.

 SIZE



To get the laser to turn on, first load it with two AAA cells (see directly below), and THEN you can go set fire to the dead wingless legless fly you found in your box of raisins*...er...uh...go do some "scientifical" experiment or something.

Aim the laser well-away from your face first. Press & hold the chrome-colored button on the barrel to turn the death ray...er...uh...LASER on; release the button to neutralise it (deactivate it).



*This is Worm Quartet...one guy (Reverend Shoebox) and three worms.
The song "Find The Dead Wingless Legless Fly In Your Box Of Raisins" is from the album "Faster than a Speeding Mullet".


To change the batteries in your blue laser, unscrew the laser at the halfway point, throw the front portion in the {vulgar term for feces}bowl, yank that silver handle on the front of the cistern down, and flush it away...O WAIT!!! THAT'S THE GOOD PART!!! So just set it aside instead.

Tip the used AAA cells out of the barrel and into your hand, and dispose of or recycle them as you see fit.

Insert a pair of new AAA cells into the lower half of the barrel, nipple-end (+) positive first.
This is the opposite of how batteries are installed in most flashlights, so please pay attention to polarity here!

Screw the two halves back together, and be done with it.
Aren't you glad you didn't flush away that front half now?

Unable to measure current (amperage) due to the way this laser was constructed.



This is a self-contained laser , and not a flashlight meant to be carried around, thrashed, trashed, and abused - so I won't try to drown it in the toliet tank, bash it against a steel rod or against a concrete porch, let my mother's big dog's ghost, my kitty cat, or or my sister's kitty cats piddle (uranate) on it, run over it with a 450lb Quickie Pulse 6 motorised wheelchair, stomp on it, use a small or medium ball peen hammer in order to bash it open to check it for candiosity, fire it from the cannoñata, drop it down the top of Mt. Erupto (I guess I've been watching the TV program "Viva Piñata" too much again - candiosity is usually checked with a laser-type device on a platform with a large readout (located at Piñata Central {aka. "Party Central"}), with a handheld wand that Langston Lickatoad uses, or with a pack-of-cards-sized device that Fergy Fudgehog uses; the cannoñata (also located at Piñata Central) is only used to shoot piñatas to piñata parties away from picturesque Piñata Island, and Mt. Erupto is an active volcano on Piñata Island), send it to the Daystrom Institute for additional analysis, or perform other indecencies on it that a flashlight might have to have performed on it. So this section of the web page will be ***SIGNIFICANTLY*** more bare than this section of the web page on a page about a flashlight.
This is a directly-injected laser though (which by their very nature are more rugged than DPSS lasers!), who's active components are the inverter circuit, the laser diode, and the collimating lens. So it should withstand accidents better than a DPSS (diode pumped solid state) laser - the type of laser assembly found in deep red (671nm), yellow (593.5nm), green (532nm), and light blue (473nm) laser pointers. These lasers have several additional components (crystals, filters, etc.) in the optical train, and you can knock them out of alignment by doing little more than looking at them the wrong way. And if any of these components are knocked out of whack, you'll no longer get your deep red, yellow, green, or blue laser beam.
Though you still do not want to intentionally drop your blue-emitting portable laser because it's a precision optical instrument.

The biggest downside to this laser is the fact that while this is clearly a CDRH Class IIIb laser (making it somewhat dangerous!!!), there are no safety features at all that are normally required in Class IIIb lasers; e.g., there is no "emissions" indicator, no startup delay, no interlock of ANY type, and no mechanical beam shutter. This laser behaves like a Class IIIa laser pointer in this regard, which I believe is a rather severe no-no!!!

There is a duty cycle reccomendation for this laser: 45 seconds on and 15 seconds off for cooling.



Beam terminus photograph of this unique (well, "not-so-unique" now) laser on the target at 12".
Beam image bloomed quite a bit Those white and purple colors doe not actually exist.
"Not no way, not no how" as they say.


Beam terminus photograph on a wall at ~10'.
Again, that white color does not really exist, and beam image bloomed somewhat.

Power output measurement
Power output peaks at 12mW.

This test was conducted on a LaserBee 2.5W USB Laser Power Meter w/Thermopile.

Spectrographic analysis
Spectrographic analysis of this laser.

Spectrographic analysis
Spectrographic analysis of this laser; spectrometer's response narrowed to a band between 442nm and 452nm to pinpoint wavelength, which is 445.880nm.

The raw spectrometer data (comma-delimited that can be loaded into Excel) is at http://ledmuseum.candlepower.us/45/445-10.txt

Spectrographic analysis
Spectrographic analysis of this laser while it was operating below lasing threshold.

Spectrographic analysis
Spectrographic analysis of this laser while it was operating below lasing threshold; spectrometer's response narrowed to a band between 440nm and 455nm to pinpoint peak wavelength, which is 447.650nm.

The raw spectrometer data (comma-delimited that can be loaded into Excel) is at http://ledmuseum.candlepower.us/45/445-10bt.txt

USB2000 Spectrometer graciously donated by P.L.

A beam cross-sectional analysis would normally appear here, but my poor defenseless helpless innocent ProMetric 8 Beam Cross-Sectional Analyser that I use for that test was destroyed by a nearby lightning strike in mid-July 2013.



TEST NOTES:
Test unit was purchased on Ebay on 03-22-14 (or "2014 22 Mar." or even "March 22, Twenty Stick-Pile of Broken Sticks" if you prefer) and was received on the afternoon of 04-04-14.


UPDATE: 00-00-00


PROS:
Color is very radiant & unusual for a pen-style handheld laser
The price is right!
Uses batteries that are common and relatively inexpen$ive
Color is very radiant an unu...o wait, I said that already!!!





NEUTRAL:





CONS:
No laser warning labelling of any type -- that's what nocked ½ star off its rating
No safety features required of a CDRH Class IIIb laser -- this is what lopped another ½ star off







    MANUFACTURER: Unknown
    PRODUCT TYPE: Blue-emitting diode laser pen
    LAMP TYPE: Unknown-type blue (450nm) laser diode
    No. OF LAMPS: 1
    BEAM TYPE: Very narrow spot
    SWITCH TYPE: Momentary pushbutton on/off button on barrel
    CASE MATERIAL: Aluminum
    BEZEL: Metal; laser & lens recessed into a hosel for them
    BATTERY: 2x AAA cells
    CURRENT CONSUMPTION: Unknown/unable to measure
    WATER- AND DIET DR. PEPPER-RESISTANT: Light splatter-resistant at maximum
    SUBMERSIBLE: ¡¡¡UN FANTASMA ESPANTOSO GRANDE QUE TOMA UNA MIERDA ENORME EN UNA CESTA DE PAPEL USADO PLÁSTICA, NO!!!
    ACCESSORIES: None
    SIZE: 156mm L x 13mm D
    WEIGHT: 70.70g (2.50 oz) incl. batteries
    COUNTRY OF MANUFACTURE: Not stated; but very likely China
    WARRANTY: Unknown/not stated



PRODUCT RATING:
Star Rating

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Subject: Review of the 5mW 445nm-450nm Blue Laser Pen


Author:
The LED (and Laser) Museum (Ok, I guess. :-/)
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 06:35:22 03/07/14 Fri


5mW 445nm-450nm Blue Laser Pen, retail $29.95
Manufactured by: (Unknown) for Lilly Electronics
Last updated 03-07-14





(In reference to the small packet that I received in the mail on the afternoon of 03-03-14:
{sung like the Foreigner song "Feels Like the First Time"}


The 5mW 445nm-450nm Blue Laser Pen (hereinafter, probably just called a "blue portable laser" or even just a "blue laser") is a royal blue-emitting, directly-injected diode laser. That is, it produces deep blue laser radiation directly, without the need for messy, fragile nonlinear crystals like those green laser pointers and the amberish-yellow and slightly greenish-blue ones as well. It uses a pair of AAA cells to feed its laser diode with.

This laser has a measured power output of 16.1868mW at 449.060nm in the blue part of the spectrum.

This is the reason I call it a "portable laser" or "laser pen" on this website instead of a "pointer". Lasers designated as "pointers" must -- by US law anyway -- have a power output that does not exceed 5mW.

It comes in a handsome aluminum body with a black matte finish and brushed chrome-colored accents.

 SIZE



To get the laser to turn on, first load it with two AAA cells (see directly below), and THEN you can use it.

Press & hold the chrome-colored button on the barrel to turn the laser on; release the button to neutralise it (deactivate it).



To change the batteries in your blue laser, unscrew the laser at the halfway point, throw the front portion in the {vulgar term for feces}bowl, yank that silver handle on the front of the cistern down, and flush it away...O WAIT!!! THAT'S THE GOOD PART!!! So just set it aside instead.

Tip the used AAA cells out of the barrel and into your hand, and dispose of or recycle them as you see fit.

Insert a pair of new AAA cells into the lower half of the barrel, flat-end (-) negative first. This is the opposite of how batteries are installed in most other laser pens, so please pay attention to polarity here!

Screw the two halves back together, and be done with it.
Aren't you glad you didn't flush away that front half now?

Unable to measure current (amperage) due to the way this laser was constructed.


This is a self-contained laser , and not a flashlight meant to be carried around, thrashed, trashed, and abused - so I won't try to drown it in the toliet tank, bash it against a steel rod or against a concrete porch, let my mother's big dog's ghost, my kitty cat, or or my sister's kitty cats piddle (uranate) on it, run over it with a 450lb Quickie Pulse 6 motorised wheelchair, stomp on it, use a small or medium ball peen hammer in order to bash it open to check it for candiosity, fire it from the cannoñata, drop it down the top of Mt. Erupto (I guess I've been watching the TV program "Viva Piñata" too much again - candiosity is usually checked with a laser-type device on a platform with a large readout (located at Piñata Central {aka. "Party Central"}), with a handheld wand that Langston Lickatoad uses, or with a pack-of-cards-sized device that Fergy Fudgehog uses; the cannoñata (also located at Piñata Central) is only used to shoot piñatas to piñata parties away from picturesque Piñata Island, and Mt. Erupto is an active volcano on Piñata Island), send it to the Daystrom Institute for additional analysis, or perform other indecencies on it that a flashlight might have to have performed on it. So this section of the web page will be ***SIGNIFICANTLY*** more bare than this section of the web page on a page about a flashlight.

This is a directly-injected laser though (which by their very nature are more rugged than DPSS lasers!), who's active components are the inverter circuit, the laser diode, and the collimating lens. So it should withstand accidents better than a DPSS (diode pumped solid state) laser - the type of laser assembly found in deep red (671nm), yellow (593.5nm), green (532nm), and light blue (473nm) laser pointers. These lasers have several additional components (crystals, filters, etc.) in the optical train, and you can knock them out of alignment by doing little more than looking at them the wrong way. And if any of these components are knocked out of whack, you'll no longer get your deep red, yellow, green, or blue laser beam.
Though you still do not want to intentionally drop your blue-emitting portable laser because it's a precision optical instrument.

The biggest downside to this laser is the fact that while this is clearly a CDRH Class IIIb laser (making it somewhat dangerous!!!), there are no safety features at all that are normally required in Class IIIb lasers; e.g., there is no "emissions" indicator, no startup delay, no interlock of ANY type, and no mechanical beam shutter. This laser behaves like a Class IIIa laser pointer in this regard, which I believe is a rather severe no-no!!!




Beam terminus photograph of this unique (well, "not-so-unique" now) laser on the target at 12".
Beam image bloomed quite a bit Those white and purple colors doe not actually exist.
"Not no way, not no how" as they say.


Beam terminus photograph on a wall at ~10'.
Again, that white color does not really exist, and beam image bloomed somewhat.


Power output measurement
Power output peaks at 21mW.

This test was conducted on a LaserBee 2.5W USB Laser Power Meter w/Thermopile.

Power output measures 16.1868mW on a Sper Scientific Pocket Laser Power Meter # 840011.


Spectrographic analysis
Spectrographic analysis of this laser.


Spectrographic analysis
Spectrographic analysis of this laser; spectrometer's response narrowed to a band between 442nm and 452nm to pinpoint wavelength, which is 449.060nm.

The raw spectrometer data (comma-delimited that can be loaded into Excel) is at http://ledmuseum.candlepower.us/45/445-9.txt


Spectrographic analysis
Spectrographic analysis of this laser while it was operating below lasing threshold.


Spectrographic analysis
Spectrographic analysis of this laser while it was operating below lasing threshold; spectrometer's response narrowed to a band between 440nm and 455nm to pinpoint peak wavelength, which is 448.350nm.

The raw spectrometer data (comma-delimited that can be loaded into Excel) is at http://ledmuseum.candlepower.us/45/445-9bt.txt

USB2000 Spectrometer graciously donated by P.L.


A beam cross-sectional analysis would normally appear here, but my poor defenseless helpless innocent ProMetric 8 Beam Cross-Sectional Analyser that I use for that test was destroyed by a nearby lightning strike in mid-July 2013.



TEST NOTES:
Test unit was purchased on Ebay on 02-07-14 (or "2014 07 Feb." or even "February 07, Twenty Stick-Pile of Broken Sticks" if you prefer) and was received on the afternoon of 03-03-14.



UPDATE: 03-09-14
The pushbutton switch is failing; it takes approx. 15 lbs (~6kg) of force to activate it instead of a matter of grams that it should take.



PROS:
Color is very radiant & unusual for a pen-style handheld laser
The price is right!
Uses batteries that are common and relatively inexpen$ive
Color is very radiant an unu...o wait, I said that already!!!


NEUTRAL:
Switch button appears to be a bit finicky


CONS:
No laser warning labelling of any type -- that's what nocked ½ star off its rating
No safety features required of a CDRH Class IIIb laser -- this is what lopped another ½ star off






MANUFACTURER: Unknown
PRODUCT TYPE: Blue-emitting diode laser pen
LAMP TYPE: Unknown-type blue (450nm) laser diode
No. OF LAMPS: 1
BEAM TYPE: Very narrow spot
SWITCH TYPE: Momentary pushbutton on/off button on barrel
CASE MATERIAL: Aluminum
BEZEL: Metal; laser & lens recessed into a hosel for them
BATTERY: 2x AAA cells
CURRENT CONSUMPTION: Unknown/unable to measure
WATER- AND DIET DR. PEPPER-RESISTANT: Light splatter-resistant at maximum
SUBMERSIBLE: ¡¡¡EL CONEJITO DE PASCUA CON UN CEPILLO DE DIENTES QUE CAYÓ EN UN HIGIÉNICO DE LOS, NO!!!
ACCESSORIES: None
SIZE: 156mm L x 13mm D
WEIGHT: 70.70g (2.50 oz) incl. batteries
COUNTRY OF MANUFACTURE: Not stated; but very likely China
WARRANTY: Unknown/not stated

PRODUCT RATING:

Star Rating

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Subject: Review of the Directly-Injected 5mW 515nm Green Laser Pen


Author:
The LED (and Laser) Museum (Extremely happy!)
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 07:26:39 02/14/14 Fri


Directly-Injected 5mW 515nm Green Laser Pen, retail $75.00
Manufactured by (Unknown)
Last updated 02-14-14







This is a green-emitting diode laser in a pen-style body.

But it's not DPSS (Diode-Pumped Solid State) like those now-common green laser pens -- no, this one uses a new technological advancement that allows green laser radiation to be produced directly, without the need for those messy, fragile nonlinear crystals!

This is the first of these green lasers to have been mass-produced in a totally self-contained "pen" format -- that I'm aware of anyway.

It's rated to produce 5mW of laser radiation at 515nm in the bluish-green part of the spectrum (these values were measured at 8mW with a wavelength of 517.880nm).


Because this is a laser, you should not shine it into your eyes, other people's eyes, pet's eyes, etc. Just use a little common sense here, k?

 Size of product w/hand to show scale SIZE



To use your shiny new (
and yes, as of early-2014 this technology is SHINY NEW and not CORRODED OLD!) Directly-Injected 515nm Green Diode Laser Pen, insert the furnished cylindrical interlock key into the keyway for it in the tailcap (rotate it as necessary until you feel it go in), turn it clockwise (as though tightening it) until it stops, and then pull it straight out. This "arms" the laser.

Press & hold down the button on the barrel for as long as you need the laser spot. A red "emissions indicator" LED will turn on; it is located immediately forward of the switch button. Release the button to turn the portable laser back off. Yes, it really is as easy as that.

If you wish, you may totally neutralise the laser by inserting the furnished cylindrical interlock key into the tailcap (rotate it as necessary until you feel it go in), turn it counterclockwise (as though loosening it) until it stops, and then pulling it straight out. Doing this disables the laser completely, so that it may not be activated even when new batteries are in place.


Photograph showing the cylindrical key, the keyway in the laser's tailcap, and the indicator dots on the tailcap.




To change the batteries in this laser, unscrew & remove the tailcap, and set it aside.

Tip the used AAA cells out of the barrel and into your hand, and dispose of, recycle, or recharge them (rechargeable cells only!!!) as you see fit. Do not under any circumstances flush them down a toliet or throw them into a trout-filled stream.

Insert two new AAA cells into the barrel, nipple-end (+) positive first. This is the opposite of how batteries are installed in most laser pens, so please pay attention to polarity here.

Screw the tailcap back on, and be done with it.

Current consumption measures 261.30mA on my DMM's 400mA scale.




This is a pen-style portable laser, not a flashlight meant to be thrashed, trashed, and abused. So I won't try to drown it in the toliet tank, bash it against a steel rod or against the concrete floor of a carport in effort to try and expose the bare Metalmarineangemon - er - the bare Metaltrailmon - um that's not it either...the bare Metalsusanoomon...er...uh...wait a sec here...THE BARE METAL (guess I've been watching too much Digimon again! - now I'm just making {vulgar term for feces} up!!!), let my mother's big dog's ghost, her kitties, my kitty or my sister's kitty cat piddle (uranate) on it, hose it down with my mother's gun, run over it with a 450lb Quickie Pulse 6 motorised wheelchair, stomp on it, use a medium ball peen hammer in order to bash it open to check it for candiosity, fire it from the cannoñata, drop it down the top of Mt. Erupto (now I guess I've been watching the TV program "Viva Piñata" too much again - candiosity is usually checked with a laser-type device on a platform with a large readout (located at Piñata Central {aka. "Party Central"}), with a handheld wand that Langston Lickatoad uses, or with a pack-of-cards-sized device that Fergy Fudgehog uses; the cannoñata (also located at Piñata Central) is only used to shoot piñatas to piñata parties away from picturesque Piñata Island, and Mt. Erupto is an active volcano on Piñata Island), send it to the Daystrom Institute for additional analyses, or perform other indecencies on it that a flashlight might have to have performed on it. Therefore, this section of the Directly-Injected 515nm Green Diode Laser Pen's web page will seem a bit more bare than this section of the web page on a page about a flashlight.

The Directly-Injected 515nm Green Diode Laser Pen is not water-resistant or submersible (it's a laser pen for Christ sakes!!!), so please keep it away from water.

The published specs on this laser pen are as follows:

  • Emission Wavelength: 515nm
  • M2: <1.20
  • Beam divergence: <2.0 mrad
  • Beam diameter at aperture: <1.50mm
  • Warmup time: <30 sec.
  • Transverse Electromagnetic Mode: TEM00
  • Operation Temperature Range: 50°F (+10°C) to 86°F (+30°C)
  • Storage Temperature Range: 14°F (-10°C) to 122°F (+50°C)
  • Operating Current: <265mA
  • Operating Voltage: +3.0 volts DC


Below, you'll find my power output and spectrographic findings (both measured with instruments specifically designed for this purpose).


Power output measurement
Power output peaks at 8mW.
Batteries for this analysis were purchased just before the test.

This test was conducted on a LaserBee 2.5W USB Laser Power Meter
w/Thermopile.

I later measured a power output of 4.4625mW on a Sper Scientific Pocket Laser Power Meter # 840011.




Beam terminus photograph on the test target at 12".
Beam image bloomed quite a bit; it also shows a lot of white that doen't exist in the actual beam.


Beam terminus photograph on a wall at ~15 feet.
As with the above photo, the beam image bloomed quite a bit; it also shows a lot of white that doen't exist in the actual beam.



Beam terminus photograph on a wall at ~15 feet.
As with the above two photographs, the beam image bloomed quite a bit; it also shows a lot of white that doen't exist in the actual beam.




Beam terminus photograph on the side of an uninhabited structure located ~275 feet (~83.82M) away.
The albedo of this structure is somewhere between 92 and 95.



Beam photograph in moderate fog.
Photo was taken at 6:40am PST on 02-02-14.






Beam terminus photographs (while the laser was deliberately being moved) in freshly-fallen snow.
Photographs were taken on the morning of 02-09-14 in Federal Way WA. USA.


Beam terminus photograph on a white wall comparing this laser with the 532nm 5mW Blue (Green-Emitting) Laser Pen.
This laser is the rightmost spot.


Beam terminus photograph on freshly-fallen snow comparing this laser with the 532nm 5mW Blue (Green-Emitting) Laser Pen.
This laser is the topmost spot.



Video on YourTube showing the laser's beam terminus spot of the Directly-Injected 5mW 515nm Green Laser Pen being projected onto freshly-fallen snow while the laser itself was being waved about.

VERY IMPORTANT!!!
This video shows what appears to be a dashed line when the laser is being moved. This is due to how the camera records video; in reality, the line is continuous and unbroken!

O BOY!
A green laser being shone onto snow!
So thrilling!!
So heart-stopping!!!
Actually, it kinda makes you want to "kik" "thuh" "spiget" "oph" "thuh" "wal" "uv" "uh" "bathetube" "ahnd" "woch" "thuh" "wattor" "schute" "acros" "thuh" "rume" doesn't it?


This video is 142.0947831628 megabytes (142,433,138 bytes) in length; dial-up users please be aware.
It will take no less than seven hundred ten minutes to load at 48.0Kbps.
This video is definitely ***NOT*** dial-up friendly!!!


Spectrographic analysis

Spectrographic analysis of this laser.



Spectrographic analysis

Spectrographic analysis of this laser; spectrometer's response narrowed to a band between 510nm and 520nm to pinpoint wavelength, which is 517.880nm.

Spectrographic analysis
Spectrographic analysis of this laser; spectrometer's response narrowed to a band between 800nm and 874nm to check for the presence of a pump laser -- which none exists (I irradiated the spectrometer's sensor quite well in effort to capture this!)

Spectral line halfwidth (FWHM) analysis (using the data that's available directly below) shows that the FWHM is 1.390nm.

The raw spectrometer data (tab-delimited that can be loaded into Excel) is at http://ledmuseum.candlepower.us/44/515point.txt

Spectrographic analysis
Spectrographic analysis of this laser below lasing threshold.

Spectrographic analysis Spectrographic analysis of this laser below lasing threshold; spectrometer's response narrowed to a band between 522nm and 542nm to pinpoint wavelength, which is 531.660nm.

The raw spectrometer data (tab-delimited that can be loaded into Excel) is at htp://ledmuseum.candlepower.us/45/bt515poi.txt

USB2000 Spectrometer graciously donated by P.L.

Power output in this below-threshold state was measured at 19.830µW (that's microwatts)



A beam cross-sectional analysis would normally appear here, but my poor defenseless helpless innocent ProMetric 8 Beam Cross-Sectional Analyser that I use for that test was destroyed by a nearby lightning strike in mid-July 2013.


In leiu of a beam cross-sectional analysis, I present to you this photograph that shows the ovoid beam profile, which is characteristic of a diode laser -- this clearly shows that it has fast and slow axes.

The distortion along the fast axis was caused by the lens used to widen the beam; it was not properly affixed to the laser's aperture and as a result, it was tilted somewhat. This does not significantly distort the actual beam image, and may safely be ignored in this case.





TEST NOTES:

Test unit was purchased on Ebay on 01-10-14, and was received at 3:51pm PST on 01-28-14.









UPDATE: 00-00-00










PROS:
Very unique beam color -- 518nm is very radiant and unusual
Beam is clean with no unwanted artifacts or speckling in it


NEUTRAL:


CONS:
Power output drops sharply when unit is exposed to cold (or even cool) temperatures







    MANUFACTURER: Unknown
    PRODUCT TYPE: Pen-style portable laser
    LAMP TYPE: Directly-injected green-emitting diode laser, red LED "emissions" indicator
    No. OF LAMPS: 2 (1 ea. laser diode & LED)
    BEAM TYPE: Very narrow spot -- it's a laser, remember?
    REFLECTOR TYPE: N/A
    SWITCH TYPE: Momentary pushbutton on/off on barrel
    CASE MATERIAL: Metal
    BEZEL: Metal; laser diode & collimating lens recessed into hosel for them
    BATTERY: 2 x AAA cells
    CURRENT CONSUMPTION: 261.30mA
    WATER- AND RED BULL ENERGY DRINK-RESISTANT: No
    SUBMERSIBLE: ¡¡¡SATANÁS USANDO UN PAÑAL DESECHABLE EMPAPADO EN ORINA, NO!!!
    ACCESSORIES: Interlock key, hard-sided storage case
    SIZE: 193mm L x 14.50mm Dia.
    WEIGHT: 85.10g (3.00 oz.) incl. batteries
    COUNTRY OF MANUFACTURE: Unknown/not stated
    WARRANTY: 1 year

    PRODUCT RATING:
    Star Rating


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Subject: Review of the Directly-Injected 515nm Green Diode Laser Module


Author:
The LED (and Laser) Museum (:D)
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 21:12:47 12/06/13 Fri



DIRECTLY-INJECTED 515nm GREEN-EMITTING DIODE LASER MODULE








Directly-Injected 515nm Green Diode Laser Module, retail $61.60 (http://www.instapark.com/detail.php?cPath=18&products_id=404)

Manufactured by (Unknown) for Instapark (www.instapark.com)

Last updated 12-03-13









This is a green-emitting diode laser.
But it's not DPSS (Diode-Pumped Solid State) like those now-common green laser pens -- no, this one uses a new technological advancement that allows green laser radiation to be produced directly, without the need for those messy, fragile nonlinear crystals!

It's rated to produce 5mW of laser radiation at 515nm in the bluish-green part of the spectrum (these values were measured at 9mW with a wavelength of 513.380nm).

This is part # 594SD52005 on Instapark's website.


Because this is a laser, you should not shine it into your eyes, other people's eyes, pet's eyes, etc. Just use a little common sense here, k?

 Size of product w/hand to show scale SIZE







To use your shiny new (
and yes, as of late-2013 this technology is SHINY NEW and not CORRODED OLD!) Directly-Injected 515nm Green Diode Laser Module, affix the heatsink first (it simply slips over the metal part of the laser) and hand-tighten the plastic screw on its side. This screw can be manipulated with the
fingers (no tools necessary); please do not use a screwdriver or else you'd risk overtightening and/or stripping the threads on it.

THIS HEATSINK IS VERY IMPORTANT; THE DIODE WILL HEAT UP QUITE RAPIDLY AND MAY FAIL WITHOUT IT IN PLACE!!!

Feed the laser anywhere from +2.5 volts to +5.5 volts DC from any convenient source -- this could be two or three AA cells connected in series, a product like the Aixiz Diode Laser PSU, or even a lithium-ion 18650 cell like the type that powers the 2 Watt S3 Spyder Arctic G2 445nm Blue Laser w/SmartSwitch™.

As usual, red wire is (+) positive and black wire is (-) negative.

If you wish to have a power (on/off) switch, you'll have to procure & install it yourself. The two wires on the switch go to the laser module's red wire and the battery (+) positive.

My Aixiz Diode Laser PSU was used to power the laser module for all of the measurements, analyses, and beam photographs present on this web page.




This portable laser requires a source of +2.5 to +5.5 volts DC, whether that comes from two or three 1.5 volt batteries in series or an AC power supply. Therefore, I do not have to tell you which part to remove, kick down the basement stairs into that dark little room crawling with thousands of hungry piss ants with full pissinary bladders, and then rather emphatically tell you not to.





The Directly-Injected 515nm Green Diode Laser Module is not water-resistant or submersible (it's a laser module for Christ sakes!!!), so please keep it away from water.



The published specs on this laser module are as follows:

    • Emission Wavelength: 510nm to 530nm
    • Optical Dot Power :4.0mW to 5.0mW (Top* = 77°F (25°C)
    • Operation Temperature Range: 14°F (-10°C) to 122°F (+50°C)
    • Operating Current: <265mA
    • Operating Voltage: +2.5 volts to +5.5 volts DC
    • Beam Size @ 15m: 9mm (slow axis) X 15mm (fast axis)
    • Operation Temperature Range**: -4°F (-20°C) to 140°F (+60°C)



Below, you'll find my power output and spectrographic findings (both measured with instruments specifically designed for this purpose).






Tops out at 9mW on a LaserBee 2.5W USB Laser Power Meter w/Thermopile.


Mid-term (2,185 seconds) stability analysis.
Laser temperature was measured at 104°F (40°C) at 2,170 seconds into the test.




Beam photograph on the test target at 12".


Beam photograph on the test target at 12"; the other (the yellower one toward the top) green spot is coming from my Evo Smartphone-Controllable Green DPSS Portable Laser outputting the same power.





Beam photograph on a wall at ~15 feet.



Spectrographic analysis

Spectrographic analysis of this laser.



Spectrographic analysis

Spectrographic analysis of this laser; spectrometer's response narrowed to a band between 510nm and 520nm to pinpoint wavelength, which is 513.380nm.

Spectrographic analysis
Spectrographic analysis of this laser; spectrometer's response narrowed to a band between 800nm and 874nm to check for the presence of a pump laser -- which none exists (I irradiated the spectrometer's sensor quite well in effort to capture this!)

Spectral line halfwidth analysis
Spectral line halfwidth (FWHM) analysis; FWHM appears to be 2.10nm.

The raw spectrometer data (tab-delimited that can be loaded into Excel) is at http://ledmuseum.candlepower.us/44/515green.txt


USB2000 Spectrometer graciously donated by P.L.


Abeam cross-sectional analysis would normally appear here, but the computer that hosted the ProMetric 8 Beam Cross-Sectional Analyser was destroyed by a lightning strike in July 2013 (the monitor had this big-ass hole blown right through its viewscreen); although a replacement computer is already en route (it just came several days ago actually), there's a fairly significant chance that the beam cross-sectional analyser itself was also taken out because both the computer & test instrument shared the AC power at the same outlet on the same power strip.





TEST NOTES:

Test unit was purchased on Ebay on 11-13-13, and the http://ledmuseum.candlepower.us/44/532green.htm">wrong unit was received on 11-18-13; the correct one was received on 11-25-13.



* Top = ambient operating temperature



** Yes, this value is stated two times in the operational materials; two differing temperature ranges are given.




UPDATE: 12-03-13
Just a subjective observation here...this laser module makes all 532nm green DPSS laser modules and portable lasers look much more yellowish than they used to.





PROS:

Very unique beam color -- 515nm is very radiant and unusual
Beam is clean with no unwanted artifacts or speckling in it



NEUTRAL:
Seems to run a bit warm





CONS:
None that I've yet to discover













    MANUFACTURER: Unknown

    PRODUCT TYPE: Laser module

    LAMP TYPE: Directly-injected green-emitting diode laser

    No. OF LAMPS: 1

    BEAM TYPE: Very narrow spot -- it's a laser, remember?

    SWITCH TYPE: N/A

    CASE MATERIAL: Fiberglass (PCB) & metal

    BEZEL: Metal; laser diode & collimating lens recessed into hosel for them

    BATTERY: N/A (uses any source of +2.5 V to +5.5 V that can source 265mA)

    CURRENT CONSUMPTION: 150.380 mA at +3.860 volts

    WATER- AND DIET ROCK-STAR ENERGY DRINK-RESISTANT: No

    SUBMERSIBLE: NADEVVO'!!! PATAT, 'OQQARMEY LO' HO' TEYWI' PUM VAJ UN-FLUSHED PUCHPA', GHOBE'!

    ACCESSORIES: Toroidal (doughnut-shaped) heatsink

    SIZE: 26mm L (incl. driver circuit) x 5.50mm Dia.

    WEIGHT: 1.20g (0.040 oz.)

    COUNTRY OF MANUFACTURE: Unknown/not stated

    WARRANTY: Unknown/not stated



    PRODUCT RATING:



    Star Rating










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Subject: Review of the Wicked Lasers Beam Expander


Author:
The_LED_and_Laser_Museum (I really don't know, :-/)
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 06:37:43 06/05/13 Wed

This is a long page with at least 19 images on it; dial-up users please allow for plenty of load time.
You have no chance to survive make your time.






Wicked Lasers Beam Expander, retail $149.95 (www.wickedlasers.com...)
Manufactured by Wicked Lasers (www.wickedlasers.com)
Last updated 06-12-13







This is my Wicked Lasers Spyder 3 Arctic G2 445nm 1W Blue Diode Laser
with the Beam Expander affixed to it.


The Beam Expander is a nifty little gadget that screws onto the end of your S3 Spyder Arctic G2 445nm Blue Laser (any vintage), Krypton, or any other Spyder III series laser that expands the laser's beam by 10x.

This at first may appear to be counterproductive, but in this case, looks really ***ARE*** deceiving.

What the beam expander does is increase the laser's range by reducing the beam divergence (a value usually expressed in milliradians or mrad) by ten times; this allows the laser's beam to stay narrower, longer.


 Size of product w/hand to show scale SIZE



To use your spiffy new (or corroded old) Beam Expander, unscrew & remove the current optic or lens from your Arctic, and screw the Beam Expander on...yes, it's really that easy.

Adjust the focus by turning the knurled (texturised) ring near the base of the Beam Expander.


There are no batteries to fuss with, so I don't have to tell you which part to remove, kick under the kitchen sink crawling with rats and cockroaches with full bladders, and then tell you rather emphatically not to.


This is an accesory that screws onto your Arctic 445nm blue laser, not a flashlight. So I won't try to drown it in the toliet tank, bash it against a steel rod or against the concrete floor of a front porch in effort to try and expose the bare Metalmarineangemon - er - the bare Metaltrailmon - um that's not it either...the bare Metalsusanoomon...er...uh...wait a sec here...THE BARE METAL (guess I've been watching too much Digimon again! - now I'm just making {vulgar term for feces} up!!!), let my mother's big dog's ghost or my sister's kitty cats spring a leak (uranate) on it, hose it down with a gun, run over it with a 450lb Celebrity motorised wheelchair, stomp on it, use a medium ball peen hammer in order to bash it open to check it for candiosity, fire it from the cannoñata, drop it down the top of Mt. Erupto (I guess I've been watching the TV program "Viva Piñata" too much again - candiosity is usually checked with a laser-type device on a platform with a large readout (located at Piñata Central {aka. "Party Central"}), with a handheld wand that Langston Lickatoad uses, or with a pack-of-cards-sized device that Fergy Fudgehog uses; the cannoñata (also located at Piñata Central) is only used to shoot piñatas to piñata parties away from picturesque Piñata Island, and Mt. Erupto is an active volcano on Piñata Island), send it to the Daystrom Institute for additional analysis, or perform other indecencies on it that a flashlight might have to have performed on it. Therefore, this section of the Beam Expander's web page will seem a bit more bare than this section of the web page on a page about a flashlight.



Photo of an uninhabited structure approx. 275 feet (~83.8M) away that I used as a target.
The albedo of this structure is ~15.




Photograph of the Wicked Lasers Spyder 3 Arctic 445nm 1W Blue Diode Laser (2)'s beam terminus spot without the beam expander in place.
I increased the camera's zoom to 24x to obtain a decent picture of the beam terminus.


Photograph of the Wicked Lasers Spyder 3 Arctic 445nm 1W Blue Diode Laser (2)'s beam terminus spot WITH the beam expander in place.
I increased the camera's zoom to 24x to obtain a decent picture of the beam terminus.



Photograph of the Wicked Lasers "Krypton" Green DPSS Portable Laser's beam terminus spot without the beam expander in place.
I increased the camera's zoom to 24x to obtain a decent picture of the beam terminus.



Photograph of the Wicked Lasers "Krypton" Green DPSS Portable Laser's beam terminus spot WITH the beam expander in place.
I increased the camera's zoom to 24x to obtain a decent picture of the beam terminus.
You can see in the beam itself that it starts out significantly wider as it exits the laser.

The Beam Expander vignettes (cuts off) the Krypton's beam by ~55%, which is why the beam appears "flared out".
This is a fault of the Krypton laser itself, not the beam expander; the beam appears to emerge from the Krypton slightly off-center.



Photograph of the Wicked Lasers "Krypton" Green DPSS Portable Laser's beam terminus spot without the beam expander in place.
I decreased the camera's zoom to 16x.



Photograph of the Wicked Lasers "Krypton" Green DPSS Portable Laser's beam terminus spot WITH the beam expander in place.
I decreased the camera's zoom to 16x.
You can see in the beam itself that it starts out significantly wider as it exits the laser.



TEST NOTES:
Test unit was sent by Jeice of Wicked Lasers on 05-06-13 (or "2013 06 May" if you prefer), and was received on 05-16-13 (or "2013 16 May" if you prefer). However, it was defective so a replacement was sent at once -- the replacement was received at 11:12am PDT on 06-03-13.



UPDATE: 06-14-13
I measured the beam diameter at aperture both with and without the Beam Expander in place.

They are as follows:

(Arctic; no beam expander):
2.0mm fast axis
5.50mm slow axis)

(Arctic; beam expander in place):
4mm fast axis
30mm slow axis

(Krypton; no beam expander):
2.0mm
(Krypton; beam expander in place):
28mm
*


* Beam is being truncated; beam diameter at aperture may be a bit innacurate as a result.
The following photograph shows this:




PROS:
Very cool accessory for your Spyder III laser
Increases the laser's visible range
Nice looking -- especially when affixed to your Spyder III laser


NEUTRAL:


CONS:
Beam must emerge from the laser perfectly centered








    MANUFACTURER: Wicked Lasers
    PRODUCT TYPE: Self-contained beam expander lens set
    LAMP TYPE: N/A
    No. OF LAMPS: N/A
    BEAM TYPE: N/A
    SWITCH TYPE: N/A
    CASE MATERIAL: Hard-anodized aluminum
    BEZEL: Metal
    BATTERY: N/A
    CURRENT CONSUMPTION: N/A
    WATER- AND DIET MT. DEW-RESISTANT: Yes (when affixed to laser)
    SUBMERSIBLE: ¡¡¡PARA LOS MOTIVOS NO DE CRISTO!!!
    ACCESSORIES: Hard-sided storage box
    SIZE: 103mm L (incl. threads) x 59mm Dia.
    WEIGHT: 181.70g (6.410 oz.)
    COUNTRY OF MANUFACTURE: China
    WARRANTY: 1 year (plus a 30-day money back guarantee)

    PRODUCT RATING:
    I'm uncertain just how I should rate this product, as I do not have access to a laser test facility with significantly longer range than what I currently have (~275 feet {~83.8M}}












Wicked Lasers Beam Expander www.wickedlasers.com...



Update 06-12-13: Measured beam dia. both with & without Beam Expander in place; added photo showing how the Krypton's beam is being truncated.

Last edited by author: Wed June 12, 2013 09:50:11   Edited 7 times.
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Subject: Review of the Wicked Lasers PhosForce Laser-To-Flashlight Converter


Author:
The_LED_and_Laser_Museum (Happy)
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 22:36:44 05/17/13 Fri

Wicked Lasers PhosForce Laser-To-Flashlight Converter, retail $79.95 (www.wickedlasers.com...)
Manufactured by Wicked Lasers (www.wickedlasers.com)
Last updated 05-24-13




This shows the PhosForce unit after I had inadvertently disassembled it; note the O-ring showing where it does not belong.


This photo shows the S3 Spyder Arctic G2 445nm Blue Laser (3) w/SmartSwitch™ v2.0 in its feral state.


This photo shows the S3 Spyder Arctic G2 445nm Blue Laser (3) w/SmartSwitch™ v2.0 with the PhosForce affixed to it.



The PhosForce Laser-To-Flashlight Converter is a nifty little gadget that screws onto the end of your S3 Spyder Arctic G2 445nm Blue Laser (any vintage) that turns your roaring monster into a meek little white flashlight.

It uses the same technology as is used in headlights on newer BMW and Mercedes Benz cars -- that is, a high-powered blue laser (your Arctic in this case) is sent through a diffractive optic (so that it doesn't simply burn a hole through the phosphor cap) and is directed toward a phosphor cap specifically designed to absorb the incoming blue laser radiation and convert it to yellow-green; when combined with what little blue laser radiation that escapes (***NOT COLLIMATED*** and does not represent an eye hazard!!!) and placed near the bottom of a mirror-smooth reflector, gives you get a very reasonable (actually, quite nice) approximation of neutral white {not bluish white but not warm white either}.

 Size of product w/hand to show scale SIZE



To use your spiffy new (or corroded old) PhosForce, unscrew & remove the current optic or lens from your Arctic, and screw the PhosForce on...yes, it's really that easy.


There are no batteries to fuss with, so I don't have to tell you which part to remove, kick under the kitchen sink crawling with rats and cockroaches with full bladders, and then tell you rather emphatically not to.


This is an accesory that screws onto your Arctic 445nm blue laser, not a flashlight. So I won't try to drown it in the toliet tank, bash it against a steel rod or against the concrete floor of a front porch in effort to try and expose the bare Metalmarineangemon - er - the bare Metaltrailmon - um that's not it either...the bare Metalsusanoomon...er...uh...wait a sec here...THE BARE METAL (guess I've been watching too much Digimon again! - now I'm just making {vulgar term for feces} up!!!), let my mother's big dog's ghost or my sister's kitty cats spring a leak (uranate) on it, hose it down with a gun, run over it with a 450lb Celebrity motorised wheelchair, stomp on it, use a medium ball peen hammer in order to bash it open to check it for candiosity, fire it from the cannoñata, drop it down the top of Mt. Erupto (I guess I've been watching the TV program "Viva Piñata" too much again - candiosity is usually checked with a laser-type device on a platform with a large readout (located at Piñata Central {aka. "Party Central"}), with a handheld wand that Langston Lickatoad uses, or with a pack-of-cards-sized device that Fergy Fudgehog uses; the cannoñata (also located at Piñata Central) is only used to shoot piñatas to piñata parties away from picturesque Piñata Island, and Mt. Erupto is an active volcano on Piñata Island), send it to the Daystrom Institute for additional analysis, or perform other indecencies on it that a flashlight might have to have performed on it. Therefore, this section of the PhosForce's web page will seem a bit more bare than this section of the web page on a page about a flashlight.

The web page about the PhosForce on the Wicked Lasers website indicates that the PhosForce produces 500 lumens of light.
Horse puckey! Horse puckey!! HOOOOORRRSSSSSSE PUUCCKYYYYYYYYY!!!




Beam terminus photograph of the PhosForce on the test target at ~12".
Measures 41,200mcd (low) and 201,300mcd (high) on an Amprobe LM631A light meter.


Beam terminus photograph of the PhosForce on a wall at ~6 feet (~1.5 meters).


Photograph showing how the diffraction grating splits the laser beam into multiple spots before it reaches the phosphor cap so as to prevent it from burning through the phosphor cap.
My Novalux Laser 2000 Protera Model 488-15 Blue-Green Laser was used here to obtain the photograph because its wavelength lies at the longer end of the phosphor's acceptance band and therefore does not seriously overload the camera's imager.

Spectrographic analysis
Spectrographic analysis of the PhosForce (low).

Spectrographic analysis
Spectrographic analysis of the PhosForce (low); spectrometer's response narrowed to a range between 550nm and 570nm to pinpoint phosphor emission peak wavelength.

The raw spectrometer data (comma-delimited that can be loaded into Excel) is at http://ledmuseum.candlepower.us/42/phosforl.txt


Spectrographic analysis
Spectrographic analysis of the PhosForce (high).

Spectrographic analysis
Spectrographic analysis of the PhosForce (high); spectrometer's response narrowed to a range between 525nm and 535nm to pinpoint phosphor emission peak wavelength.

The raw spectrometer data (comma-delimited that can be loaded into Excel) is at http://ledmuseum.candlepower.us/42/phosforh.txt

Spectrographic analysis

Spectrographic analysis of the PhosForce when white light was shone into it from the "wrong" end to show the prescence of a dichroic filter.

The raw spectrometer data (comma-delimited that can be loaded into Excel) is at http://ledmuseum.candlepower.us/42/phosfilt.txt


USB2000 Spectrometer graciously donated by P.L.


ProMetric analysis
Beam cross-sectional analysis.
That dark spot to the left of center and just above the red line that queered the test is a defect in the ProMetric's imager that cannot be compensated for.

Image made using the ProMetric System by Radiant Imaging.




TEST NOTES:
Test unit was sent by Jeice of Wicked Lasers on 05-06-13 (or "2013 06 May" if you prefer), and was received on 05-16-13 (or "2013 16 May" if you prefer).

Although the concept is brilliant, this is absolutely the worst product to ever have come from Wicked Lasers.
Knowing this, I'll still be keeping the PhosForce in my arsenal of products that get used frequently because the actual light quality is simply fantastic!

UPDATE: 05-19-13
From a person who's work in photonics I implicitly trust, comes the following (no changes to syntax or grammar were made):

"I think that 500 lumen figure is the amount of light leaving the phosphor cap when it is irradiated by the maximum amount of light that the relevant laser series can produce. I think that is 2 watts.

If the laser beam is an 800 mW one, then only 200 lumens leaves the phosphor cap.

A majority of that 200 lumens probably goes rearwards, back to the laser. There are 2 fixes:

The lesser fix is painting white all forward surfaces of the laser and any non-phosphor rear surfaces of the converter. Use the brightest white
paint available at a paint store or home center. The rearward light will mostly bounce around, and some of it will go out through the phosphor cap.

The greater fix is to have a dichroic filter before the phosphor cap. The filter would pass blue laser light, and reflect the yellowish emission
of the phosphor cap."


In light of this, I've decided to increase the product's rating quite significantly.


UPDATE: 05-20-13
There does indeed appear to be a dichroic filter already in place, as the following photograph demonstrates:



This photograph was taken with the Arctic (440nm) laser beaming into the output-end of the PhosForce; instead of a blazing white light, a somewhat feeble blue light is transmitted -- feeble enough that it didn't overload the camera's CCD imager even when the camera was virtually head-on and an unfiltered laser beam would destroy it.



PROS:
Nifty "widget" that turns your dangerous laser into a harmless flashlight
Rather unique; uses relatively new technology
Durable metal case
Light it produces is a nice white color
Beam is smooth, with no rings, splotches, or other little evil little things (artifacts) in it

NEUTRAL:

CONS:
Ad copy is misleading -- unit does ***NOT*** produce 500 lumens when used with an older Arctic -- not no way, not no how!
Not efficient (as the web page indicates)




    MANUFACTURER: Wicked Lasers
    PRODUCT TYPE: Phosphor-based conversion to white flashlight for the Arctric laser
    LAMP TYPE: N/A
    No. OF LAMPS: N/A
    BEAM TYPE: Medium spot w/soft corona
    SWITCH TYPE: N/A
    CASE MATERIAL: Hard-anodized aluminum
    BEZEL: Metal; phosphor cap & refector protected by glass window
    BATTERY: N/A
    CURRENT CONSUMPTION: N/A
    WATER- AND DIET MT. DEW-RESISTANT: Yes
    SUBMERSIBLE: ¡¡¡PARA LOS MOTIVOS NO DE CRISTO!!!
    ACCESSORIES: Hard-sided storage box
    SIZE: 41mm L (incl. threads) x 35mm Dia.
    WEIGHT: 56.1g (1.980 oz.)
    COUNTRY OF MANUFACTURE: China
    WARRANTY: 1 year (plus a 30-day money back guarantee)

    PRODUCT RATING:
    Star Rating




Update 05-18-13: Added a photograph showing how the diffraction grating 'tames' the laser beam before it burns a hole in the phosphor cap.

Update 05-19-13: Added some text from a photonics expert re: the 500 lumens value; upgraded the 'star' rating as a result

Update 05-20-13: Added photograph evidence of the presence of a dichroic filter in this product.

Last edited by author: Fri May 24, 2013 09:16:22   Edited 9 times.
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Subject: Review of Lambda's Keylight Nano


Author:
The_LED_and_Laser_Museum (Happy)
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 09:19:37 05/09/13 Thu

This is a long page with at least 25 images on it; dial-up users please allow for plenty of load time.
You have no chance to survive make your time.




Lambda's Keylight Nano, retail $15.00 (www.lambdalights.com...)
Manufactured by K.F. (aka. Lambda) (www.lambdalights.com)
Last updated 05-13-13







The Keylight is a key fob light that allows you to easily find your keys at night or when the power fails.
They're also useful for marking trip lines, tent zippers, climbing ropes, or use as trail markers or on dog collars to keep track of Fido in the dark.

It comes in a thick brass body with a custom-made optic that helps to disperse the light so that it is visible from an extremely wide angle of 360° in the X-axis (horizontally) by approx. 270° in the Y-axis (vertical). It features a single LED driven at approx. 9µA (0.009mA) -- this allows for a battery life of a year or more even on the itsy-bitsy teeny-weenie SR48 button cells it feeds from!

 Size of product w/hand to show scale SIZE



The Keylight is ready to go as soon as you receive it; there are no switches to fuss with or forget, and the batteries can last more than 1 year!

Simply attach it to your keyring using the split ring, already affixed to the tailcap of the Keylight.



To change the power cells in your Keylight, remove the split ring from the product, and set it aside.

Next, remove the "butt plug" from the tailcap; use a knife blade to pry it outward and then use a pair of pliers to grab onto it and finish pulling it straight out. Set that aside as well.

Use a small screwdriver to remove the spring from inside the barrel, set THAT aside as well.

Tip out the 'battery carriage' (a plastic sleeve), and use the business-end of a small screwdriver to push the dead, dead SR48 button cells out (or just s**tcan the whole mess if the cells are taped together). Dispose of or recycle them as you see fit. Do not use your foot to push them under the Lazy-Boy where the family cat might find them, do not attempt to flush them down the loo, and for God sakes please do not throw them over the side of a dock where they might hit a flounder on the way down to the sea bottom.


The parts you should now have (before disposing of the batteries anyway) look like this.

Install two new SR48 silver oxide button cells; make sure to insulate the cells with tape. Note that a great alternative to using tape is a soft drink straw from McDonalds cut to appropriate length. Orient the cells so that the button-ends (-) negatives go in first.

Insert the spring, and use the small screwdriver you originally used to remove it in order to push it all the way down -- if you've done everything correctly up to this point, the unit should now spring to life.

Insert the 'butt plug' into the barrel, orienting it so that the the end closest to the black O-ring goes in first -- but (and now this part is important, so pay attention...
I SAID PAY ATTENTION!!! ) -- be certain that the hole in the 'butt plug' is aligned with the hole in the barrel -- use the pliers to turn the 'butt plug' so that the holes are aligned...NOW you can finish pushing it in.

Finally, insert the split ring back in the hole (use the pliers and/or the screwdriver to open it wide enough so that one of its free ends goes in the hole).

This battery changing procedure is somewhat difficult, but take solace in knowing that you only have to do it once a year or so!




This is a glowing key fob, not a flashlight meant to be thrashed, trashed, and abused. So I won't try to drown it in the toliet tank, bash it against a steel rod or against the concrete floor of a carport in effort to try and expose the bare Metalmarineangemon - er - the bare Metalwargrowlmon - um that's not it either...the bare Metaldarktyrannomon...er...uh...wait a sec here...THE BARE METAL (guess I've been watching too much Digimon again! - now I'm just making {vulgar term for feces} up!!!), let my mother's big dog's ghost, her kitties, my sister's kitty cat, or my own kitty cat piddle (uranate) on it, hose it down with my mother's handgun, run over it with a 450lb Quickie Pulse 6 motorised wheelchair, stomp on it, use a medium ball peen hammer in order to smash it open to check it for candiosity, fire it from the cannoñata, drop it down the top of Mt. Erupto (now I guess I've been watching the TV program "Viva Piñata" too much again - candiosity is usually checked with a laser-type device on a platform with a large readout (located at Piñata Central {aka. "Party Central"}), with a handheld wand that Langston Lickatoad uses, or with a pack-of-cards-sized device that Fergy Fudgehog uses; the cannoñata (also located at Piñata Central) is only used to shoot piñatas to piñata parties away from picturesque Piñata Island, and Mt. Erupto is an active volcano on Piñata Island), send it to the Daystrom Institute for additional analysis, or perform other indecencies on it that a flashlight might have to have performed on it. Therefore, this section of the Lambda's Keylight Nano's web page will seem a bit more bare than this section of the web page on a page about a flashlight.

Having said that, there ***IS*** an O-ring between the "butt plug" and the barrel; this should help keep nasties like water, diet Diet Berries & Cream Dr. Pecker, bird poop, mud, glycol (from antifreeze), windshield washer fluid, etc. out of the Keylight.




Photograph of all four Lambda's Keylight Nanos illuminated.



Photo of three of the four Keylights sent illuminating white paper positioned under their, "business-ends".

The blue one is not shown here because the battery pack has inexplicably vanished from its barrel!!!.
I'm unsure of just how such a thing could happen; I consider myself to be somewhat of an expert in portable, self-contained light sources and ***I*** had to ask Lamba how to execute a battery change, so I very highly doubt that anybody in this household could've disasembled it, removed the battery pack, then properly reassembled it. And I know with absolute, positive, 100% certainty that it was on when I went to the drug store the other day!!!
Apparently, somebody has some kind of quantum subspace transporter that 'beamed' the battery pack out of the Keylight and to some other location!!!



Spectrographic analysis
Spectrographic analysis of the LED in the red version of this product.


Spectrographic analysis
Spectrographic analysis of the LED in the red version of this product; spectrometer's response narrowed to a band between 625nm and 635nm to pinpoint peak wavelength, which is exactly 629.00nm.

The raw spectrometer data (comma-delimited that can be loaded into Excel) is at http://ledmuseum.candlepower.us/42/keyred.txt



Spectrographic analysis
Spectrographic analysis of the LED in the green version of this product.


Spectrographic analysis
Spectrographic analysis of the LED in the green version of this product; spectrometer's response narrowed to a band between 530nm and 540nm to pinpoint peak wavelength, which is 536.130nm.

The raw spectrometer data (comma-delimited that can be loaded into Excel) is at http://ledmuseum.candlepower.us/42/keygreen.txt


Spectrographic analysis
Spectrographic analysis of the LED in the blue version of this product.


Spectrographic analysis
Spectrographic analysis of the LED in the blue version of this product; spectrometer's response narrowed to a band between 465nm and 475nm to pinpoint peak wavelength, which is 468.770nm.

The raw spectrometer data (comma-delimited that can be loaded into Excel) is at http://ledmuseum.candlepower.us/42/keyblue.txt



Spectrographic analysis
Spectrographic analysis of the LED in the purple version of this product.


Spectrographic analysis
Spectrographic analysis of the LED in the purple version of this product; spectrometer's response narrowed to a band between 450nm and 460nm to pinpoint native emission peak wavelength, which is 453.290nm.


Spectrographic analysis
Spectrographic analysis of the LED in the purple version of this product; spectrometer's response narrowed to a band between 610nm and 670nm to pinpoint phosphor peak wavelength, which is 644.880nm.


The raw spectrometer data (comma-delimited that can be loaded into Excel) is at http://ledmuseum.candlepower.us/42/keypur.txt


USB2000 Spectrometer graciously donated by P.L.




TEST NOTES:
Test sample of these units (four of them in different colors) were sent by K.F. aka. Lambda of www.lambdalights.com on 05-05-13 (or "2013 05 May" or even "May 05, Twenty-Stick-Boobs" if you prefer) and was received at 5:09pm PDT on 05-08-13.


UPDATE: 00-00-00


PROS:
Totally unique product
Very durable construction for a key fob light



NEUTRAL:
Battery change (difficult) only needs to be performed once a year
Batteries are cheap if you purchase them from Lambda's website


CONS:
Batteries it uses could be locally expen$ive and/or difficult to locate -- that's what nocked off ½ star (they're cheap if you purchase them from Lambda's website!)
Battery changing procedure is somewhat difficult -- that's what took out the other ½ star







    MANUFACTURER: Lambda Lights
    PRODUCT TYPE: Glowing key fob
    LAMP TYPE: 3mm LED
    No. OF LAMPS: 1
    BEAM TYPE: Extremely wide-angle torroidal configuration (X=360°, Y=~270°)
    SWITCH TYPE: N/A
    CASE MATERIAL: Metal with plastic piece on business-end
    BEZEL: Transparent plastic piece to protect LED
    BATTERY: 2x SR48 silver oxide button cells
    CURRENT CONSUMPTION: Unknown/unable to measure
    WATER- AND URANATION-RESISTANT: Yes
    SUBMERSIBLE: ¡¡¡HUSOOS CRISTO USANDO UN ANDADOR NO!!!
    ACCESSORIES: 2x SR48 silver oxide button cells, split ring
    SIZE: 42mm L x 9mm Dia.
    WEIGHT: 11.60g (0.41 oz.) incl. batteries
    COUNTRY OF MANUFACTURE: USA
    WARRANTY: 1 year



    PRODUCT RATING:

    Star Rating




Last edited by author: Mon May 13, 2013 08:03:31   Edited 6 times.
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Subject: "White Light" (RGB) 400mW Laser


Author:
The_LED_and_Laser_Museum (I really don't know, :-/)
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 08:12:51 04/24/13 Wed

This is a long page with at least 27 images on it; dial-up users please allow for plenty of load time.
You have no chance to survive make your time.






"White Light" (RGB) 400mW Laser, retail $135.00
Manufactured by (Unknown) for Techhood (http://stores.ebay.com/techhood)
Last updated 04-30-13




The "White Light" (RGB) 400mW Laser is exactly what you think it is...it's a "white light" (RGB) 400mW laser!


It is a very small portable laser that does much the same as the $300,000.00 RGB laser like I saw at the California State Fair in 1982; that laser system used argon-ion and krypton-ion lasers that were so large that the installation took up the better part of a small room (such as a bathroom), required active water cooling, and used enough power to run a house.

This laser uses directly-injected laser diodes for the red & blue, and a DPSS (Diode-Pumped Solid State) laser for the green.

The connectors that feed the red, green, and blue lasers in this unit can be unplugged, so that you can isolate various colors (like red, green, blue, purple, cyan, and yellow).

This laser has power outputs of 155mW (red), 82mW (green),190mW (blue) and 449mW (white --all three lasers on simultaneously.

The wavelengths were spectrographically measured at 660.660nm (red), 532.010nm (green), and 454.700nm (blue).



 Size of product w/hand to show scale SIZE



To use your spiffy new (or corroded old) "White Light" (RGB) 400mW Laser, take the included wire & connector combo (the one with red & black wires), and plug it into the shielded male receptacle on the corner nearest that large 1000µF electrolytic capacitor (the tallest component on the board; a large cylindrical (pop can-shaped) thing.

If the connector on the free end doesn't fit any 7.5 to 12 volt DC power supply you have, take a pair of dikes (the wirecutters, not the other kind! ),
snip the connector off, and strip the insulation off the two wires.

Connect the wire with the black stripe on it to the negative (-) terminal of a power source that delivers +7.5 to +12 volt DC and can comfortably sink at least 1,000mA (1 amp), and connect the red wire (without a black stripe on it or black anywhere on it for that matter) to the positive (+) terminal. In my case, I used a pair of 18650 lithium ion cells in series to get ~7.6 volts.

As soon as the power supply is energised, the laser will fire up. Be certain that the laser is not directed to your eyes (or to the eyes of any person or animal in the vicinity) and/or directed toward any flammable materials before you apply power to it.




The "White Light" (RGB) 400mW Laser is intended to be powered from an external power supply, not batteries internal to the unit, so I don't have to tell you which part to remove, load onto a stolen space shuttle and blasted to high Earth orbit, transferred over to Zephram Cochrane's ship the Phoenix, and then jump to warp with a course set to Tau Alpha C and then rather emphatically tell you not to.

Current usage measures a rather modest 961mA when powered with two series 18650 cells; my bench power supply simply doesn't have the {vulgar slang term for male nads} to sink this amount of current at +12 volts as this module is supposedly rated for its input voltage.




This is a laser, not a flashlight designed to be thrashed,bashed, trashed, and abused. So I won't try to drown it in the toliet tank, bash it against a steel rod or against the concrete floor of a carport in effort to try and expose the bare Metalmarineangemon - er - the bare Metaltrailmon - um that's not it either...the bare Metalsusanoomon...er...uh...wait a sec here...THE BARE METAL (guess I've been watching too much Digimon again! - now I'm just making {vulgar term for feces} up!!!), let my mother's big dog's ghost, her kitties, my kitty or my sister's kitty cat piddle (uranate) on it, hose it down with my mother's gun, run over it with a 450lb Quickie Pulse 6 motorised wheelchair, stomp on it, use a medium ball peen hammer in order to bash it open to check it for candiosity, fire it from the cannoñata, drop it down the top of Mt. Erupto (now I guess I've been watching the TV program "Viva Piñata" too much again - candiosity is usually checked with a laser-type device on a platform with a large readout (located at Piñata Central {aka. "Party Central"}), with a handheld wand that Langston Lickatoad uses, or with a pack-of-cards-sized device that Fergy Fudgehog uses; the cannoñata (also located at Piñata Central) is only used to shoot piñatas to piñata parties away from picturesque Piñata Island, and Mt. Erupto is an active volcano on Piñata Island), send it to the Daystrom Institute for additional analyses, or perform other indecencies on it that a flashlight might have to have performed on it. Therefore, this section of the "White Light" (RGB) 400mW Laser's web page will seem a bit more bare than this section of the web page on a page about a flashlight.

Typically, I do not perform abusive testing on any laser or product which lases.
I know you like to see me try and break things, but "ain't" "gonna" happen today folks!!!

The three beams do coalesce into a single white spot (both right at the laser aperture and farther away ) quite well -- better than I was expecting actually...but additional testing has revealed that the beams seperate quite noticeably when the laser is directed at a target ~200 feet distant.

The biggest downside to this laser is the fact that while this is clearly a CDRH Class IIIb laser (making it somewhat dangerous!!!), there are no safety features at all that are normally required in Class IIIb lasers; e.g., there is no "emissions" indicator, no startup delay, no interlock of ANY type, and no mechanical beam shutter. This laser behaves like a Class IIIa laser pointer in this regard, which I believe is a rather severe no-no!!!





Beam photograph on the test target at 12".


Beam photograph on a wall at ~8 feet.


Photograph of the laser's actual beam.


Beam photograph on a wall at ~55 feet to show that the laser's beams are not perfectly aligned.


Spectrographic analysis
Spectrographic analysis of this laser (all three colors on).

Spectrographic analysis
Spectrographic analysis of this laser (red), spectrometer's response narrowed to a band between 645nm and 655nm to pinpoint wavelength, which is 660.660nm.

Spectrographic analysis
Spectrographic analysis of this laser (green), spectrometer's response narrowed to a band between 528nm and 538nm to pinpoint wavelength, which is 532.010nm.

Spectrographic analysis
Spectrographic analysis of this laser (blue), spectrometer's response narrowed to a band between 450nm and 460nm to pinpoint wavelength, which is 454.700nm.

The raw spectrometer data (comma-delimited that can be loaded into Excel) is at http://ledmuseum.candlepower.us/42/rgbw.txt

USB2000 Spectrometer graciously donated by P.L.



ProMetric analysis
Beam cross-sectional analysis (fast axis {X-axis}).


ProMetric analysis
Beam cross-sectional analysis (slow axis {Y-axis}).
Those spots in the beams in both analyses are artifacts from the lens used to diverge the beams.

Images made using the ProMetric System by Radiant Imaging.


Power output measurement
Power output (red lasers only) peaks at 155mW.


Power output measurement
Power output (green laser only) peaks at 82mW.


Power output measurement
Power output (blue laser only) peaks at 190mW.


Power output measurement
Power output (all lasers on) peaks at 449mW.

Power output measurement
Power output (all lasers on) peaks at 450mW -- known freshly charged batteries were used for this test.
The laser was allowed to warm up for 205 seconds.

Power output measurement
Power output (all lasers on) peaks at 461mW -- again, known freshly charged batteries were used for this test.
The laser was allowed to warm up for 230 seconds.


Power output measurement
Short-term (600 seconds {10 minutes}) stability analysis.

All analyses were conducted on a LaserBee 2.5W USB Laser Power Meter w/Thermopile.







TEST NOTES:
Test unit was purchased on Ebay on 04-09-13 and was received at 11:32am PST on 04-22-13


UPDATE: 04-25-13
I took it outside for a little distance test...the results aren't good here folks!
At approx. 200 feet, the beams were very clearly seperated -- I did not at all expect to see this considering how well the beams stayed coalesced into a white spot at indoor distances.

As a result, a star is coming off its rating.



PROS:
Compact size & shape
Operates from low voltage DC




NEUTRAL:





CONS:
No safety features required of a CDRH Class IIIb laser -- there goes one star
"White" (all three beams combined) beam 'comes apart' at distance -- and ***POOF!!!*** there goes another!






    MANUFACTURER: Unknown
    PRODUCT TYPE: RGB ("white light") laser
    LAMP TYPE: Laser diodes (R & B directly injected; G is DPSS)
    No. OF LAMPS: 3
    BEAM TYPE: Extremely narrow spot
    SWITCH TYPE: N/A
    CASE MATERIAL: Metal & fiberglass
    BEZEL: Metal; lasers recessed into a hosel for them
    BATTERY: N/A
    CURRENT CONSUMPTION: 961mA when powered with two series 18650 cells
    WATER- AND URANATION-RESISTANT: No
    SUBMERSIBLE: ¡¡¡EL DIABLO USA PAÑALES LLENO DE MIERDA!!!
    ACCESSORIES: Two small cords terminated in two-pin female connectors
    SIZE: 80mm L x 41mm W x 81mm H
    WEIGHT: 521.00g (18.380 oz.)
    COUNTRY OF MANUFACTURE: Unknown/not stated; possibly China
    WARRANTY: Unknown/not stated


    PRODUCT RATING:

    Star Rating





Last edited by author: Tue April 30, 2013 11:17:40   Edited 5 times.
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