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Art Education

Welcome to Art Education!


Back to the Incredible Art Department

Subject: Alphabet graphic print


Author:
Dave
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Date Posted: 20:21:06 04/18/03 Fri

I'm trying to find a print of a graphic by Francis Brennan. It is simply the 26 letters of the alphabet, with the letters sized according to frequency of use in the English language. The different sized (and different colored) letters are artfully arranged on a white background.

Anybody have any idea where it can be found?

Please reply to peano2@aol.com

Thanks.

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[> Subject: Re: Alphabet graphic print


Author:
Genevieve Roudiez
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Date Posted: 11:08:32 06/24/13 Mon

Did you ever find this? I do own a signed, framed one.



I'm trying to find a print of a graphic by Francis
>Brennan. It is simply the 26 letters of the alphabet,
>with the letters sized according to frequency of use
>in the English language. The different sized (and
>different colored) letters are artfully arranged on a
>white background.
>
>Anybody have any idea where it can be found?
>
>Please reply to peano2@aol.com
>
>Thanks.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Subject: Carved picture of Legend of North Dakota


Author:
Glenda Prieve
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Date Posted: 17:03:04 12/20/06 Wed

I have this framed picture that I can not find any information about, maybe you guys could help me. It looks to be carved on marble and is only cream and black. It has different historical scenes of North Dakota history. Its name id "Legend of North Dakota", #'s 562/1250, only name of the artist is "Gray". If you would like me to send you a picture of it just email me. I really need to know about this piece but I have had no luck. Thanks for any help.

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[> Subject: Re: Carved picture of Legend of North Dakota


Author:
Derek D. Smothermon
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 16:09:50 02/01/08 Fri

I have a marble etching "The Legend of Tulsa". Mine is 219/1250. I have been searching for this artist too. If you still have your piece I might be able to help you. I have some information about the artist that made yours and mine. I have found others with marble etchings and some info about David Gray. I am also taking my piece down to a art appraiser to have them find out more and to give me some documents about the artist and my art work that will allow me to sell it for top dollar if i so choose. If you would like you can call me anytime at 918-378-0690. I would like to see a picture of yours to if you would like email me a good detailed picture of your art work and i will take the pictures to the appraisers for you. I have others that have sent me some pictures too. Thank You, DEREK SMOTHERMON

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[> [> Subject: Re: Carved picture of Legend of North Dakota


Author:
chaundel
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Date Posted: 15:51:38 09/29/09 Tue

I have a marble etching "High Flight".
220/750. I have been searching for this artist as well. May I contact you for information on David Gray?

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[> [> [> Subject: Etched picture of Cleveland


Author:
Barb
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 07:58:07 11/04/13 Mon

>I have two marble etching "Cleveland" and "ohio the legend of leadership"
Anyone find out anything on this artist??
What I read on him he was from Kansas City... But then the trail stops.
Bought mine at an auction for 80.00 about 20 yrs ago.

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[> [> Subject: David Gray Carved Art


Author:
Alisa
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Date Posted: 19:14:56 06/29/10 Tue

>I have run across a couple and own one marble etched picture by david gray but i can't find anything on him...someone help!

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Subject: Please Share This With Art Students & Art Teachers


Author:
John R Math
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Date Posted: 12:26:10 03/05/13 Tue

2013 “All Student” Online Juried Art Competition

Light Space & Time Online Art Gallery announces an art call for the gallery’s 1st Annual “All Student” Juried Art Competition for the month of April 2013. The gallery invites all Art Students, worldwide, who work in 2 dimensional art form (including photography) to make online submissions for inclusion into the Gallery’s May 2013 online group art exhibition.

Light Space & Time encourages entries from Students regardless of where they reside and regardless of their experience or education in the art field to send us your best 2 dimensional art. This is an open theme competition. The 2013 All Student Art Competition is open to all students worldwide. The following are the categories for this competition; Grades 1st through 6th, Grades 7th through 12th and finally, any College through Graduate School Students will be allowed to submit their 2D art.

Winners of the "All Student" Art Exhibition will receive extensive worldwide publicity in the form of email marketing, 70+ press release announcements, 75+ event announcement posts, extensive social media marketing and distribution, in order to make the art world aware of the art exhibition and in particular, the artist’s accomplishments. There will also be links back to the artist’s website included as part of this award package. The deadline to apply is April 26, 2013.

Interested artists should provide to us with your best art now or before the deadline. Apply Online Here: http://www.lightspacetime.com

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Subject: Calling for mail art


Author:
Lynn Hwang (:))
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Date Posted: 13:50:27 08/30/12 Thu

Dear Sir/Madam,
I would like to invite your students/children to participate in this art exhibition titled "East Meets West". Venue: The Arts House Gallery (Singapore)

Kindly read more about this exhibition here: http://nutsaboutarts-lynn.blogspot.sg

Pls let me know in advance if you are keen to participate. You may drop me a note at my blog or email me. Thanks.

Thank you for your time and attention.

Cheerios,
Lynn
(Singapore)

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Subject: Autistic


Author:
Nicole Lindsey
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Date Posted: 22:24:04 08/29/12 Wed

I have a new push-in very young group of k-2nd graders that have autism, extreme spectrum with aids, 2x a week.
I'm having a very hard time with project ideas that are not all paint!??
Thanks for any ideas.

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Subject: Black & White water color artist of Black Natives J.P. Ludu


Author:
Theodora
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Date Posted: 23:07:26 09/26/01 Wed

I have 4 paintings by an artist named J.P.Ludu. They seemed to be water colors,Black and white of black natives some with a head dress on, not native americans and they don't seem to be Africans. The painting is detail to the point that they look like they are photographs. The only information I got from the store I brought them, they were on assignment and the man who own them said they belonged to his death mother who travel the world. So, she apparently purchased them on one of her many trips.

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[> Subject: Re: Black & White water color artist of Black Natives J.P. Ludu


Author:
Mark
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 19:47:14 07/02/02 Tue

I also have one of J P Ludu watercolors. Have you found any information on the artist?


>I have 4 paintings by an artist named J.P.Ludu. They
>seemed to be water colors,Black and white of black
>natives some with a head dress on, not native
>americans and they don't seem to be Africans. The
>painting is detail to the point that they look like
>they are photographs. The only information I got from
>the store I brought them, they were on assignment and
>the man who own them said they belonged to his death
>mother who travel the world. So, she apparently
>purchased them on one of her many trips.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
[> [> Subject: Re: Black & White water color artist of Black Natives J.P. Ludu


Author:
A Foggon
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Date Posted: 08:13:42 11/21/04 Sun

>My dad has two paintings by JP Ludu. He met the artist in Africa while working in Zambia in the late sixties.

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[> [> Subject: Re: Black & White water color artist of Black Natives J.P. Ludu


Author:
Gill (I also have 2 which i LOVE)
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 09:33:19 12/05/07 Wed

>I also have one of J P Ludu watercolors. Have you
>found any information on the artist?
>
>
>>I have 4 paintings by an artist named J.P.Ludu. They
>>seemed to be water colors,Black and white of black
>>natives some with a head dress on, not native
>>americans and they don't seem to be Africans. The
>>painting is detail to the point that they look like
>>they are photographs. The only information I got from
>>the store I brought them, they were on assignment and
>>the man who own them said they belonged to his death
>>mother who travel the world. So, she apparently
>>purchased them on one of her many trips.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
[> Subject: Re: Black & White water color artist of Black Natives J.P. Ludu


Author:
William
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Date Posted: 17:04:28 03/31/05 Thu

My parents have 2 paintings by Ludu which they bought in Uganda or Kenya where they were living in the early 1950s.

William

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[> Subject: Re: Black & White water color artist of Black Natives J.P. Ludu


Author:
Lisbeth
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Date Posted: 10:14:06 12/09/06 Sat

I have some of his paintings, bought in Kenya in the 1960s. He used to paint several, sell them, buy some booze, end up in jail. Come out, and start again!

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[> [> Subject: Re: Black & White water color artist of Black Natives J.P. Ludu


Author:
Antoinette
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Date Posted: 14:24:50 02/04/07 Sun

>I have some of his paintings, bought in Kenya in the
>1960s. He used to paint several, sell them, buy some
>booze, end up in jail. Come out, and start again!

> I have just unearthed a watercolour by JP Ludu that belonged to my great aunt - who in her younger days spent quite a lot of time in Africa. Has anyone any further information on the artist? Are they of any value?

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[> Subject: Re: Black & White water color artist of Black Natives J.P. Ludu


Author:
Roger Netting
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Date Posted: 12:09:12 02/13/07 Tue

I have an excellent painting (25x35cm) by J P Ludu that I purchased while I was a surveyor in Uganda in the late 1950s. It is a watercolour of an African (head and shoulders only) with various adornments. I always believed him to be a Masai tribesman but he might be from one of the other East African nomadic tibes. Research is required to identify which one. I believe that Ludu was Kenyan but he was employed as a cartographical draughtsman in the Survey Department of Uganda at Entebbe. His work was in such demand that he quit his job and became a full-time artist.

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[> [> Subject: Re: Black & White water color artist of Black Natives J.P. Ludu


Author:
Cheryl Cullman Guider
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Date Posted: 06:29:20 02/03/08 Sun

>I have an excellent painting (25x35cm) by J P Ludu
>that I purchased while I was a surveyor in Uganda in
>the late 1950s. It is a watercolour of an African
>(head and shoulders only) with various adornments. I
>always believed him to be a Masai tribesman but he
>might be from one of the other East African nomadic
>tibes. Research is required to identify which one. I
>believe that Ludu was Kenyan but he was employed as a
>cartographical draughtsman in the Survey Department of
>Uganda at Entebbe. His work was in such demand that he
>quit his job and became a full-time artist.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
[> Subject: Re: Black & White water color artist of Black Natives J.P. Ludu


Author:
Roger Netting
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Date Posted: 16:52:49 02/26/07 Mon

I have a watercolour by J P Ludu that I bought in Kampala, Uganda in the late 1950s. J P Ludu was a cartographical draughtsman in the Lands and Surveys Department of Uganda. However his talent as an artist meant that he could readily sell his pictures to tourists visiting Uganda and to people working in Uganda like myself. He eventually decided to become a full time artist and returned to his native Kenya. My picture is a splendid painting of the head and shoulders of an African tribesman, possibly Masai but not sure. The facial features are particularly good

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[> [> Subject: Re: Black & White water color artist of Black Natives J.P. Ludu


Author:
Ann
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Date Posted: 05:10:38 12/15/07 Sat

>I too have a pair of paintings by J.P. Ludu that my parents bought in Uganda in the 50s. They are of a Kikuyu woman and man with headress. In my opinion the standard of drawing is very high and we value them for that reason. I have a watercolour by J P Ludu that I bought in
>Kampala, Uganda in the late 1950s. J P Ludu was a
>cartographical draughtsman in the Lands and Surveys
>Department of Uganda. However his talent as an artist
>meant that he could readily sell his pictures to
>tourists visiting Uganda and to people working in
>Uganda like myself. He eventually decided to become a
>full time artist and returned to his native Kenya. My
>picture is a splendid painting of the head and
>shoulders of an African tribesman, possibly Masai but
>not sure. The facial features are particularly good

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
[> Subject: Re: Black & White water color artist of Black Natives J.P. Ludu


Author:
Reginald Letsatsi (exciting)
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Date Posted: 01:43:35 10/01/07 Mon

We have just come across one (A4-size)watercolour painting of a African youngman signed JP Ludu. We believe Ludu is South African, born in the Eastern Cape. It's believed oppressive laws in the 1950 forced him to leave home and go into exile in the West Africa Africa where established himself as artist. We are doing the necessary checks with the authorities. Please lets keep in touch
Letsatsi

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[> Subject: Re: Black & White water color artist of Black Natives J.P. Ludu


Author:
Neil and Frances Muir
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Date Posted: 09:40:08 09/08/08 Mon

>I have a watercolour paintings by an artist named J.P.Ludu of what looks like the head and upper body of a Masai. I was born in Kenya in the 1950's and my parents must have bought the painting in either Kenya or Uganda.
Does anyone collect these things or know of their value?

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[> Subject: Re: Black & White water color artist of Black Natives J.P. Ludu


Author:
T Ludu (:))
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Date Posted: 13:11:14 03/14/12 Wed

I am happy that after all these year, people have come out to appreciate JP Ludu's Art. He was such a man who knew what he was doing and he would have done more than ans sold many of of his works to tourist that valued and loves his work. Some clarification about his origin. JP Ludu was a Ugandan Citizen who originated from the Eastern part of Ugandan meaning he was never Kenyan nor South African or Zambian like some peopl have stated and he was a law abidding citizen meaning through out his life he never stepped in prison. I am happy to that despite his depature, his work still leaves on and speakes Volumes. RIP JP Ludu and we love you. One of his sons read some of these articles and he couldnt stop smiling.
Thanks to all those that believed and still believe that he was a great artist. One love.

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Subject: Student self-portrait drawings on tea towels


Author:
Suzy Walters
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Date Posted: 14:49:49 01/24/12 Tue

Does Anyone need an idea for Mother’s Day? Something that the entire school can participate in? For a couple of years now, an art teacher in Norwich Vermont has been creating tea towels with the self portrait drawings of the students. She always organizes this project once a year before Christmas and then uses them to raise funds for their elementary school. Several teachers have organized this project across Canada and the US not only as a fundraiser but also just as a gift for parents either at the end of a school year or for Mother’s Day. I’ll be honest, my company makes these tea towels and I do the layout of the drawings that are mailed to us. We have found it really hard to reach teachers and share with them this idea without spending a lot of dollars on advertising, so I’m trying to pass the word around through blogs. If I’m totally off base, please let me know but if you are curious and would like to know more, you’ll find everything on our website www.creativeteatowels.com. I’m Suzy Walters and I hope to hear from you soon. Thanks for reading this☺

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Subject: Art Lessons on Exercise and nutrition


Author:
Michele F.
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Date Posted: 13:09:28 10/14/08 Tue

Does anyone have any ideas for art lessons on nutrition for 1st grade and Exercise for 3rd grade. I definately don't want cookie cutter art because it will be judged.

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[> Subject: Re: Art Lessons on Exercise and nutrition


Author:
rcder41
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Date Posted: 15:44:41 11/13/11 Sun

I did a lesson using Guiseppe Archemboldo. He's the one that did all fruit faces. He's easy to look up on google. Because my 3rd graders were too young to really do a whole face with food I had them do a place setting and the food on the plate had to make a face. You could also add the fact that it has to be healthy food as well or work it in somehow?


>Does anyone have any ideas for art lessons on
>nutrition for 1st grade and Exercise for 3rd grade. I
>definately don't want cookie cutter art because it
>will be judged.

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Subject: First-year Art Teacher


Author:
Sarah
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Date Posted: 10:18:10 10/14/06 Sat

Hello Everyone--

I am a first-year Art teacher, and I need your help. I teach K-8 and I see each class once per week for 40 minutes. So far, I have been doing random lesson plans for the kids. Should I be following a more organized curriculum? If so, what are some suggestions? There is a steep learning curve for me this year!!

I appreciate ANY comments or suggestions, about anything!!

Sarah

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[> Subject: Re: First-year Art Teacher


Author:
Ken Rohrer
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Date Posted: 01:50:52 10/19/06 Thu

I encourage you to join our list group and forum for assistance. You can join our forum at http://incredibleart.proboards83.com/index.cgi and our list group at http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/aeai/unblock.html

There is a page on IAD that discusses curriculum:

http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/links/toolbox/curriculum.html

Ken Rohrer
Moderator

------------------------------------------

>Hello Everyone--
>
>I am a first-year Art teacher, and I need your help.
>I teach K-8 and I see each class once per week for 40
>minutes. So far, I have been doing random lesson
>plans for the kids. Should I be following a more
>organized curriculum? If so, what are some
>suggestions? There is a steep learning curve for me
>this year!!
>
>I appreciate ANY comments or suggestions, about
>anything!!
>
>Sarah

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
[> Subject: Re: First-year Art Teacher


Author:
laurel lammers
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 18:15:07 04/10/07 Tue

>
First year teacher,

I have had similar situations for 18 years. I have developed my own lessons using the core content from my school district. These lessons are sometimes one or two class periods long with a few that last longer. I like to have longer lessons to enable the kids to really put time and effort into these art projects. I tie most of these together as units that include art history and assessment. My exception for this is when we are doing clay. For storage purposes I do this lesson by the day. Example: Tuesday classes do clay and no one else until I have fired their work and it has gone home.
I am involved in a long project to improve my assessment and teaching for such short contact time with the students so any other suggestions for the time starved let me know. Thanks



Hello Everyone--
>
>I am a first-year Art teacher, and I need your help.
>I teach K-8 and I see each class once per week for 40
>minutes. So far, I have been doing random lesson
>plans for the kids. Should I be following a more
>organized curriculum? If so, what are some
>suggestions? There is a steep learning curve for me
>this year!!
>
>I appreciate ANY comments or suggestions, about
>anything!!
>
>Sarah

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[> Subject: Re: First-year Art Teacher


Author:
Dylan (cool)
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 01:11:49 06/19/09 Fri

i think you should start with some easy cartoons for the young ones and for tha yr 8s try something like read a goosebumps book or something and get them to draw a picture of there fav situation.

By tha way im in yr 8 except im homeschooled bye.

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[> Subject: Re: First-year Art Teacher


Author:
Marianna
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 21:38:25 03/29/11 Tue

I suggest taking your art standards for your state and starting from there. This will give you an outline for what each grade should be exposed to throught the year. Then look for lessons the match them. As years go by, you will fine tune what you want to teach where.


>Hello Everyone--
>
>I am a first-year Art teacher, and I need your help.
>I teach K-8 and I see each class once per week for 40
>minutes. So far, I have been doing random lesson
>plans for the kids. Should I be following a more
>organized curriculum? If so, what are some
>suggestions? There is a steep learning curve for me
>this year!!
>
>I appreciate ANY comments or suggestions, about
>anything!!
>
>Sarah

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
[> Subject: Re: First-year Art Teacher


Author:
Rcder41
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 15:37:54 11/13/11 Sun

Most school systems really don't seem to have a set art curriculum. what we do have however is state standards that expects our students to meet certain benchmarks at certain ages. Those then become a base for you to design your lessons from. I personally try to tie my lessons to a particular standard in addition to an historical artist which adds another dimension to the lesson.


>Hello Everyone--
>
>I am a first-year Art teacher, and I need your help.
>I teach K-8 and I see each class once per week for 40
>minutes. So far, I have been doing random lesson
>plans for the kids. Should I be following a more
>organized curriculum? If so, what are some
>suggestions? There is a steep learning curve for me
>this year!!
>
>I appreciate ANY comments or suggestions, about
>anything!!
>
>Sarah

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Subject: substitute teacher story


Author:
Ana (The Night Owl)
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 15:10:54 11/08/11 Tue

Hello Teachers!

I am a substitute teacher in Los Angeles and let me tell you - it is not easy out there! I know what regular teachers have to deal with on a daily basis, and wow my hat is off to you brave folks of the teaching world.

Here is my story, I took a long term position at a school where teachers were dropping out left and right - because students were just out of control. I stayed there to help administrators out until the end of the school year. Even though it was not easy - it was stable for a substitute. And so after the year ended, administration was happy with my work - gave me a great review - and asked to come back next year as an in-house sub.

Summer time came and everything was great, but when it was getting closer for the school year to begin, naturally, I put in a few phone calls to check in with administration. I did hear back from the office manager who said she will be looking into it with administration.

I waited two weeks, I called again, nothing - a run around - I called and emailed a third time and was ignored. Never knew what happened, school started and nothing was ever said to me. Not even the courtesy of thank you for your services but we cannot rehire you, not a single word. As you can read, I was shocked at such unprofessional behavior and a little angry at how I was treated because I was a substitute.

So, I began to think at how I was going to change the world I live in - and I thought well, I can start a little online shop and try to build something while I look for work again.
And I wanted to share a link to a little shop I've set up trying to make ends meet when substitute jobs are scarce.
I hope the moderator does not mind - I am a real person, a teacher and just trying to build up my online shop.

Visit my link at http://www.tierradulce.etsy.com

Thank you!!
Ana-

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Subject: supplies


Author:
gelindo ferrin
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Date Posted: 13:05:06 04/27/11 Wed

I would like some ideas.
I have several hundred cardboard tubes, from TP paper towels ,etc. Can anyone please suggest a H.S. project or 2 with these??
THANK!!!!

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Subject: Printmaking student safety contract


Author:
Stephen Klesius
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Date Posted: 10:15:11 03/14/11 Mon

Hello everyone,
Does everyone have a printmaking student safety contract that they could share with me? I am a student teacher who will be teaching a linocut lesson to high school students and would like for them to pass a safety test before beginning cutting.
thanks

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Subject: Perspective


Author:
Miss Fig
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 18:28:16 05/02/10 Sun

I hate teaching perspective (any point) because of how BORING it is to just create a pencil drawing. I understand its value in any art class, but I want to do something more interesting with it. Any ideas???

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[> Subject: Re: Perspective


Author:
Jonathan Honneyman (Jonathan Honneyman)
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 09:20:10 11/28/10 Sun

You might try having students create a snapshot of a dream or story to give the guided practice a stage.

>I hate teaching perspective (any point) because of how
>BORING it is to just create a pencil drawing. I
>understand its value in any art class, but I want to
>do something more interesting with it. Any ideas???

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
[> Subject: Re: Perspective


Author:
ArtC (not to busy to care)
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 21:54:26 12/04/10 Sat

>My middle school kids are amazed when they learn how to write their name in perspective. Easier vesion would be a letter or just innitials. If no time to create a color background, letters could be cut out and pasted over a magazine image or a calendar which clearly depicts one of the taught perspectives. Kids also like perspective more if it is a part of something they love like cartooning. I hope that will help a bit.

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[> Subject: Re: Perspective


Author:
Michelle
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Date Posted: 10:47:27 02/06/11 Sun

Try using color pencils to liven up image. Still teaching perspective but visually appealing, maybe color is what you crave:)

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[> Subject: Re: Perspective


Author:
Janet Wilcox (artist trading cards)
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 15:38:04 02/23/11 Wed


I created artist trading cards with my 5th-8th grades. I am looking for schools to exchange cards with. If you have done this assignment, please email me if you would like to trade cards....
>I hate teaching perspective (any point) because of how
>BORING it is to just create a pencil drawing. I
>understand its value in any art class, but I want to
>do something more interesting with it. Any ideas???

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Subject: Rome Art Program 2011


Author:
Rome Art Program
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 14:55:07 02/21/11 Mon

We Have Scholarships Available

Launched in 2009, the Rome Art Program is designed to inspire participants to expand their artistic vision through painting and drawing on the streets of Rome and Florence; expanding on the plein-air tradition of earlier generations of artists.

The Program is incorporated as a U.S. non-profit educational organization and is directed by Carole Robb, Head of Atelier (Painting) at the New York Studio School. A winner of the Rome Prize in Painting (1980), a Fulbright Scholar, and member of the National Academy, Ms. Robb has worked and exhibited in Rome, London, and New York. She will be teaching painting in this program.

The Program's ideology is based on the compelling impact that firsthand observation and perception have on drawing and painting. Participants will work on location�taking their inspiration from the evocative ruins, churches, Renaissance palaces, streets and gardens that constitute the Italian landscape. Critiques and lectures will lend insight and prompt a deeper knowledge of each participant�s artistic journey. Guiding participants through important sites, distinguished art historians will illuminate the significance of historic places and periods.

The Rome Art Program welcomes students pursuing their BA and MFA degrees in Studio Art, as well as painters and sculptors looking to renew their studio practice. Working plein-air, where the street and garden become the studio, profoundly impacts the focus and output of our participants.

Sessions can be taken in 2, 4, 6, and 8 week segments.
Email: info@romeartprogram.org
Website: http://romeartprogram.org

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Subject: computer art software?


Author:
Jennifer
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 17:35:03 10/19/10 Tue

I am a K-8 art teacher and teach a few computer art lessons to each grade every year. We have been using Appleworks which came with the Mac computers in our computer lab and it served my purpose for these projects. We are getting newer Macs this year and they don't have that program anymore. Does any one have a recommendation for a drawing or painting program that is similar and Mac compatible? (oh and cheap too)

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[> Subject: Re: computer art software?


Author:
Ken Rohrer
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 23:54:26 11/09/10 Tue

I believe that iLife is the replacement for Appleworks now. However, my favorite Mac paint program is Color It! by Digimage. It is cheap but has many of the same features as Photoshop. You can buy it at http://www.digimagearts.com/

Ken

>I am a K-8 art teacher and teach a few computer art
>lessons to each grade every year. We have been using
>Appleworks which came with the Mac computers in our
>computer lab and it served my purpose for these
>projects. We are getting newer Macs this year and
>they don't have that program anymore. Does any one
>have a recommendation for a drawing or painting
>program that is similar and Mac compatible? (oh and
>cheap too)

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Subject: 20 minute "chunking"


Author:
H Hughes
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 22:45:35 10/20/10 Wed

I am a middle school art teacher who with my other colleagues on the Explore Team are questioning the research behind this idea that students cannot pay attention or remain engaged in an activity for more than 20 minutes. From what I can tell this research has only been done in a lecture class setting not a hands on class like art,woodshop, or cooking and I disagree with the findings.Does anyone have any suggestions as far as articles or research that pertains to this subject and hands on classes?

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Subject: Phantom Tollbooth


Author:
Lisa Tolbert
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 14:21:17 09/01/10 Wed

I have been asked to support the middle school students with an art piece inspired by the Phantom Tollbooth. I was thinking about combining a surrealistic lesson with the book but not completely sure how that can work. I'm open for any ideas.

As a side note, I would really like to send my appreciation to the creators of this website. It has been a lifesaver, an eyeopener and just a wonderful resource.

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Subject: Looking for Ceramic Artists for 3D Printed Art


Author:
Will Shambley (Excited about new product)
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 15:17:50 08/19/10 Thu

Hello folks,

My company, Viridis3D is looking for beta testing customers for two new 3D printing media, one for making 3D ceramic objects direcly from computer drawings, and another media tha can make sand casting molds (i.e. for making iron, brass, bronze, etc. castings).

If there are any artists with interest, please look us up at www.viridis3d.com.

I look forward to hearing from you!

Will

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Subject: string art


Author:
lk in la
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 22:09:00 02/23/03 Sun

you can find string art kits and supplies at www.sewingupmath.com

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[> Subject: Re: string art


Author:
Joel L. Avery
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 16:26:04 12/05/04 Sun

Thanks for the info on string art. :)

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[> Subject: Re: string art


Author:
BRAHAM CARBONELL (FUN)
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 10:29:34 06/17/10 Thu

>you can find string art kits and supplies at
>www.sewingupmath.com
do u know pam showley she was my teacher this year she taught as how to do please send me some intruction please reply to pam showley or me

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Subject: Complimentary Art "Brunch & Browse" June 13th


Author:
Joe Dolice
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 15:52:37 05/22/10 Sat

David Tobey is an art & music teacher in the New Rochelle, NY school system, in addition to being a professional painter, sculptor and violinist member of the Westchester Philharmonic Orchestra.

On Sunday, June 13th from 1 to 5 p.m., New Rochelle art collector & enthusiast Yvonne Wynter and David will host a complimentary "Brunch & Browse" at Mrs. Wynter's home at 52 Nob Court in New Rochelle. The event marks the closing of a three-month long exhibition of David's paintings, sculpture and prints that have been on private display there for Ms. Wynter's friends & guests since March.

Since Mrs. Wynter has agreed to open this event to the public, I think this would be a great place for members of the Incredible Art Department who may be in or near Westchester County, NY to get together, to see Tobey's work and to meet him and other people in the area who are involved in art. Join us if you can!

Driving directions & more information about the event are on David's home page at http://www.davidtobey.com and in our media release at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2010/05/prweb3981114.htm.

Thanks very much.

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Subject: Art


Author:
Zania
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 11:18:47 05/05/10 Wed

i love art because you get to express youself freely!

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Subject: Re: Christine Besacks Art Club Trash Art


Author:
Jennifer Donovan
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 14:28:21 03/02/10 Tue

I am planning a recycling project for my Intermediate students. I came across the Trash Art Project "Fish" from Christine Besacks. I wanted to know if anyone has done this project and if you can tell me what types of recycled items where put on the fish. It looks great, but I can't tell from the photo what materials were used. Thank you

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Subject: pottery residency


Author:
char manning
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 12:40:44 12/20/09 Sun

I have been trying to get a 2 week pottery residency, with a professional potter, for January or February. I have been potting for 5 years and have self taught some bad habits. I am looking for something in a warmer climate like Florida, California, New Mexico, Arizona, etc. Mexico ok too.Is anyone interested in working with me? (61 yr. old female)Contact me at charmanning@shaw.ca

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[> Subject: Re: pottery residency


Author:
Ken
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 01:30:42 02/19/10 Fri

You should post your question to the art education list group at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/art_education/. I'm sure you would get an answer from them.

>I have been trying to get a 2 week pottery residency,
>with a professional potter, for January or February.
>I have been potting for 5 years and have self taught
>some bad habits. I am looking for something in a
>warmer climate like Florida, California, New Mexico,
>Arizona, etc. Mexico ok too.Is anyone interested in
>working with me? (61 yr. old female)Contact me at
>charmanning@shaw.ca

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Subject: photography


Author:
atifwahid
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 07:20:05 12/04/09 Fri

child photography sell your photos, tips for better photography http://photographersworldwide.blogspot.com/

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Subject: the importance of BDAE


Author:
Kipod Doker
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 09:56:09 10/19/02 Sat

Hello,
What is the importance (if at all...) of DBAE? What is it to you? (I'm doing a research on this issue, please help).

Thank You, K. Doker

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[> Subject: Re: the importance of BDAE


Author:
Phili Ponesos (Phipos)
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 03:30:56 11/26/09 Thu

Just anothe way of thinking. Just ignor it and get yourself going after your heart.

>Hello,
>What is the importance (if at all...) of DBAE? What is
>it to you? (I'm doing a research on this issue, please
>help).
>
>Thank You, K. Doker

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Subject: Beginners and artist 8 to 80 please read


Author:
artistoftime
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 21:03:54 07/31/03 Thu

artistoftime

The formula of art is just how your own eye perceives light.When you look at an object, the eye sees different values of that cetain color the object is made up off ,if you know how the eye works
from your eye to your canvas than you can move this object in any perspective shape you desirer.that's why these two sentences were called the formulaofart because its that simple.

formulaofart

The darkest dark is the dark closes to you or meets your eye first.

The lightest light is the light closes to you or meets your eye first

Use this formula to benifit your style of art , its to help you not change you , woun't make you draw better , Woun't help your creativity , It will just help you move the other persons eye to see perspective in your work.



I'll explain a little further. This works in line drawing , values of color , geometric shapes creating image , masses of color or shapes.This works with all aspects of art style , fine art ,abstraction,impressionism , realism , surrealism , you get the picture.

If you would like to learn more about this formula you can email at artist1@localnet.com. I'm not selling you the formula its free I hope you are talented enough just to say " I get it ".

Please no negitive artist , we can all argue our point, the point is this is the truth , and all artist should know this.
If you do know this formula , no feedback because your not the person this should be helping , want it the benifit the young artist , the beginners from 8 to 80

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Subject: reply to tutoring


Author:
julie fearns pheasant
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 00:06:10 09/13/01 Thu

Hi
I have done the same thing...successfully. I have tutored a nine year old and a seventeen year old who was doing so badly in his other uppper school lessons
but so visually talented I approached the college he was interested in and asked them what they would suggest re portfolio requirements and took it from there...
I'm in Australia - so it might be different...
- Make sure their drawing skills in the principles and elements of design are up to standard. Give the student exercises in negative and positive shapes and tell them you want them to use a visual diary every day.
- In the portfolio there should be examples - good examples of their skills - not just throw ins. If you have an example of line, tone, painting etc it would be good.

Don't hesitate to contact me if any more questions.
cheers
julie

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Subject: Freedom of Speech


Author:
Peri
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 15:18:55 10/05/04 Tue

Hi, I am a middleclass American computer graphic designer (advertising), art/photo instructor in high school, perpetual student, babyboomer, former political activist turned spiritualist, and world traveler having a foot in Artsednet and now in Art4Peace. I am interested in symbology as a method of conveying the message of peace and freedom under repression.

I agree that freedom of expression coupled with responsibility of the expressor to stand for freedom promotes peace. The message of repression on the otherhand, is self defeating and therefore defeats the progress of society thereby causing war between repressor and the repressed. Peace is won often with the blood of the seeker and learned through the initiation of fire. (symbolically speaking that is). Truth of art is in the eye of the beholder. "Beauty is truth, truth beauty." Keats (1795-1821)

I look forward to chatting with you towards art and peace and relevant topics.
Peri

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Subject: Oil painting cloth


Author:
Don E
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 13:59:29 08/08/02 Thu

Several years ago many "Dime" stores sold a painting medium that could be mixed with ordinary artist oil paint for painting on textile. Now no one seems to know what this medium was. I think the name was Textine.
Does anyone have any idea where this medium or something like it may be obtained.

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[> Subject: Re: Oil painting cloth


Author:
Debra Gash
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 08:04:43 02/07/07 Wed

>Several years ago many "Dime" stores sold a painting
>medium that could be mixed with ordinary artist oil
>paint for painting on textile. Now no one seems to
>know what this medium was. I think the name was
>Textine.
> Does anyone have any idea where this medium or
>something like it may be obtained.

It is Textine, made by M. Grumbacher. I just saw it referenced in a 1959 textile surface design book, and amazingly found a can on the the shelf at my local art supply store. I haven't tried it yet, but I suspect it is no longer in production.

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[> [> Subject: Re: Oil painting cloth


Author:
Don E
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 16:54:17 03/16/09 Mon

Thank you very much. I Will contact the manufacturer and hope they can tell me what the chemistry for this product consisted of.

>>Several years ago many "Dime" stores sold a painting
>>medium that could be mixed with ordinary artist oil
>>paint for painting on textile. Now no one seems to
>>know what this medium was. I think the name was
>>Textine.
>> Does anyone have any idea where this medium or
>>something like it may be obtained.
>
>It is Textine, made by M. Grumbacher. I just saw it
>referenced in a 1959 textile surface design book, and
>amazingly found a can on the the shelf at my local art
>supply store. I haven't tried it yet, but I suspect it
>is no longer in production.

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Subject: New website - eccentric paintings for sale!


Author:
Kevin
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 15:10:22 09/11/08 Thu

I just found this website with eccentric paintings and thought I would share it with everyone here. It's called Funktional Junkie

Enjoy!



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Subject: Ancient Greek Art


Author:
Stevie James
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 15:16:47 09/03/01 Mon

Although the ancient Greeks admired physical beauty, most important in relationships between men and boys was character. Honor, integrity, courage, and philosophy were sought. Of course, as today, the less noble paired up as well.

http://dejesus.1colony.com/greekart.html

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[> Subject: Re: Ancient Greek Art


Author:
jazzy
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 10:10:07 09/29/08 Mon

wutz up im in skool and im bored what yu doin??

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Subject: need art posters, resources


Author:
Ms. S
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 05:16:07 08/06/08 Wed

I need art resources as I am teaching at a school overseas.
Please respond and I will send you my email and address.
I teach prek- AP art at an intl. school.

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Subject: requesting in scholarship within Nigeria University


Author:
Jimmy Anderson
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 06:03:22 10/13/04 Wed

> To whom it concern.
> I am Jimmy Anderson.

I am a Nigeria boy,
I am requesting for a free schoolarship within Nigeria.
Please send me any information about any Scholarship in Nigeria.
Hoping for youe immediate respon.
THank You very much, And God Bless.
Jimmy.

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Subject: Inventor of Plastercine


Author:
William Harbutt
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 05:22:15 05/13/08 Tue

I have been working on details of where William Harbutt was born, as we are keen to erect a blue placque in his honour. We have a copy of his birth certificate but was wondering if anyone has any further information or photographs we could use to assist us.

Any help you could give us would be greatly appreciated.

Many Thanks

Sarah

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Subject: New interactive art site: Spakkle; an artsy Google


Author:
John Sitler
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 14:33:00 03/04/08 Tue

I just released a new interactive art site called http://www.Spakkle.com that I thought people here might be interested in. It lets you add background pictures, change color schemes, and add borders to a page from which you can perform web searches. I thought that adding a bit of creativity to such an everyday task like doing a Google search would be a great way of promoting art in our society. I also have some education links on the different famous art works that are in the fine art photo section. It's pretty easy to figure out, but just remember to hit the 'SAVE' button when you have it how you like it.

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Subject: Looking for a Middle School Class to Trade ATCs with!


Author:
Shaye Watson
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 14:06:06 02/06/08 Wed

I am looking for a class to trade Art trading cards with. I have about 130 middle school students who would love to trade with another MS or HS.

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Subject: Trading ATC's with my class


Author:
Hallie Redman
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 15:12:34 01/17/08 Thu

I teach art to 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th graders. We are looking for a class to trade ATC's with. We are located north of Chicago.
If you are interested, please contact.

Hallie Redman

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Subject: Contemporary Media/ Art Lesson ideas?


Author:
Shannon
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 19:39:55 11/14/07 Wed

Hello all, I am teaching Art 1 to grades 9-12 and am looking for ideas to teach our "Contemporary Media" unit. Any ideas of what would work for this? This is my first year and I'm following the curriculum to my best ability... haven't had time to develop my own too much yet. Anything is appreciated!

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Subject: Award-Winning George Catlin Web Site


Author:
Faye Powe
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 11:28:22 10/27/03 Mon

Award-Winning George Catlin Web Site is a Key Resource for
Lewis and Clark Bicentennial

Web site: http://CatlinClassroom.si.edu


Teachers and students only:
Faye Powe (202) 275-1583

"Campfire Stories with George Catlin: An Encounter of Two Cultures," a Web site created by the Smithsonian American Art Museum and debuted to great acclaim last fall, is targeted to teachers and students in grades 5-12. It is designed to present different perspectives on issues related to Catlin’s art and life as well as commentary on American Indian concerns. It has received rave reviews internationally from educators and students. A middle-school teacher wrote, “This site is incredible. I am so excited to use it with my English students!” “I just found your Web site,” wrote a teacher from the Virgin Islands. “It is incredible, wonderful. WOW. Can’t wait to share it with other teachers and our students.”
This richly layered site includes virtual campfire discussions moderated by naturalist and writer Peter Matthiessen; commentary from Native American writers and leaders such as Wilma Mankiller, William Least Heat-Moon and W. Richard West; and primary source materials including George Catlin's journal. Resources include more than 450 Catlin paintings, activities and lesson plans, a digitized version of one of Catlin's sketchbooks, and various photographs and maps. Site content was developed to meet national curriculum teaching standards in history, geography, visual arts, English language arts, and science for grades 5–12.
The site also serves as an interdisciplinary resource for teachers celebrating the Lewis and Clark Bicentennial, a commemoration of the 200th anniversary of the historic journey by explorers Meriwether Lewis and William Clark. Catlin met and painted Clark and spent two years based in St. Louis, occasionally accompanying Clark to treaty-making councils. From St. Louis, Catlin journeyed northwestward to the boundless prairies described by Lewis and Clark as well as by the artist. Catlin painted some American Indian villages where Lewis and Clark had been entertained a quarter of a century earlier. He also visited with and painted Black Moccasin, an aged Hidatsa chief, who recollected meeting Lewis and Clark on their historic journey.
Teachers and students in the larger metropolitan areas of Kansas City, Los Angeles, Houston, and New York City will have a special opportunity to view in person more than one hundred paintings of Plains Indian life by Catlin when the exhibition “George Catlin and His Indian Gallery” travels to those cities. After opening at The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City, Mo. (Feb. 7–April 18, 2004), the exhibition travels to the Autry Museum of Western Heritage in Los Angeles (May 9–Aug. 4, 2004), The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston (Oct. 10, 2004–Jan. 16, 2005), and the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian, George Gustav Heye Center, New York City (Feb. 26–Aug. 7, 2005).
The Web site has won two distinguished awards. It is the American Association of Museums 2003 Gold Medal Winner of the MUSE Award in Art. It also was named the Best Educational Web Site for 2003 by Museums and the Web. At the 2003 South by Southwest Interactive Festival, the site was a finalist in the educational resource category. "We are very proud to be recognized by such prestigious organizations," said Elizabeth Broun, the Margaret and Terry Stent Director of the Smithsonian American Art Museum. "The Catlin Web site continues the Smithsonian American Art Museum's long tradition of creating educational tools and our national commitment to online learning."
The MUSE Award judges commented, "Across the board, this is an excellent application of technology in the context of art interpretation and education," while the Museum and the Web judges stated, "The interactive component, which plays a major role in any educational process, seems here to be at its highest development."
Visit the award-winning Web site at CatlinClassroom.si.edu

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
[> Subject: Re: Award-Winning George Catlin Web Site


Author:
Kay Kok Chung Oi
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 06:23:23 11/02/07 Fri

I think it is an amazing web site to enhance learning experiences among teachers and students. Since technology gives us the accessibility to attain information, I am wondering if this website can hyperlink to other museums in other countries. This is because teachers can use such resoures as a base for students to conduct comparative studies in culture from different countries and perhaps to create an online lesson plan with such resources. Just a thought.

>Award-Winning George Catlin Web Site is a Key Resource
>for
>Lewis and Clark Bicentennial
>
>Web site: http://CatlinClassroom.si.edu
>
>
>Teachers and students only:
>Faye Powe (202) 275-1583
>
>"Campfire Stories with George Catlin: An Encounter of
>Two Cultures," a Web site created by the Smithsonian
>American Art Museum and debuted to great acclaim last
>fall, is targeted to teachers and students in grades
>5-12. It is designed to present different
>perspectives on issues related to Catlin’s art and
>life as well as commentary on American Indian
>concerns. It has received rave reviews
>internationally from educators and students. A
>middle-school teacher wrote, “This site is incredible.
> I am so excited to use it with my English students!”
>“I just found your Web site,” wrote a teacher from the
>Virgin Islands. “It is incredible, wonderful. WOW.
>Can’t wait to share it with other teachers and our
>students.”
>This richly layered site includes virtual campfire
>discussions moderated by naturalist and writer Peter
>Matthiessen; commentary from Native American writers
>and leaders such as Wilma Mankiller, William Least
>Heat-Moon and W. Richard West; and primary source
>materials including George Catlin's journal.
>Resources include more than 450 Catlin paintings,
>activities and lesson plans, a digitized version of
>one of Catlin's sketchbooks, and various photographs
>and maps. Site content was developed to meet national
>curriculum teaching standards in history, geography,
>visual arts, English language arts, and science for
>grades 5–12.
>The site also serves as an interdisciplinary resource
>for teachers celebrating the Lewis and Clark
>Bicentennial, a commemoration of the 200th anniversary
>of the historic journey by explorers Meriwether Lewis
>and William Clark. Catlin met and painted Clark and
>spent two years based in St. Louis, occasionally
>accompanying Clark to treaty-making councils. From
>St. Louis, Catlin journeyed northwestward to the
>boundless prairies described by Lewis and Clark as
>well as by the artist. Catlin painted some American
>Indian villages where Lewis and Clark had been
>entertained a quarter of a century earlier. He also
>visited with and painted Black Moccasin, an aged
>Hidatsa chief, who recollected meeting Lewis and Clark
>on their historic journey.
>Teachers and students in the larger metropolitan areas
>of Kansas City, Los Angeles, Houston, and New York
>City will have a special opportunity to view in person
>more than one hundred paintings of Plains Indian life
>by Catlin when the exhibition “George Catlin and His
>Indian Gallery” travels to those cities. After
>opening at The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas
>City, Mo. (Feb. 7–April 18, 2004), the exhibition
>travels to the Autry Museum of Western Heritage in Los
>Angeles (May 9–Aug. 4, 2004), The Museum of Fine Arts,
>Houston (Oct. 10, 2004–Jan. 16, 2005), and the
>Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian,
>George Gustav Heye Center, New York City (Feb. 26–Aug.
>7, 2005).
>The Web site has won two distinguished awards. It is
>the American Association of Museums 2003 Gold Medal
>Winner of the MUSE Award in Art. It also was named the
>Best Educational Web Site for 2003 by Museums and the
>Web. At the 2003 South by Southwest Interactive
>Festival, the site was a finalist in the educational
>resource category. "We are very proud to be
>recognized by such prestigious organizations," said
>Elizabeth Broun, the Margaret and Terry Stent Director
>of the Smithsonian American Art Museum. "The Catlin
>Web site continues the Smithsonian American Art
>Museum's long tradition of creating educational tools
>and our national commitment to online learning."
>The MUSE Award judges commented, "Across the board,
>this is an excellent application of technology in the
>context of art interpretation and education," while
>the Museum and the Web judges stated, "The interactive
>component, which plays a major role in any educational
>process, seems here to be at its highest development."
>Visit the award-winning Web site at
>CatlinClassroom.si.edu

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Subject: help


Author:
kituyi john (anybody)
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 03:18:52 10/07/07 Sun

i need help from anybody to help me finish my education in kenya.please your assistance will be highly appreciated,i come from single mother home who has struggle very hard to bring me and my 3bros and one sis up,helping me complete my university education at university of eastern africa baraton will be highly appreciated thanks in advance

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Subject: Constitution Day- I need help


Author:
Brandi (needing help)
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 22:12:12 08/30/07 Thu

I am a first year art teacher at an elementary school. I have some 5th grade teachers that want me to have a lesson to help with Constitution Day during the week of Sept 17th. I have been searching for a lesson and can't find one. Can anybody help or point me in the right direction?

Thanks

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Subject: teachertube


Author:
Tina
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 17:30:23 08/09/07 Thu

Is anyone familiar with teachertube.com? If so, can you provide some information regarding this site? Thanks

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
[> Subject: Re: teachertube


Author:
Ken Rohrer
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 00:14:53 08/21/07 Tue

Wow! I'm impressed. A YouTube for teachers.

Ken Rohrer

------------------------------------------

>Is anyone familiar with teachertube.com? If so, can
>you provide some information regarding this site?
>Thanks

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
Subject: Fabric design learning sytem, Adobe Photoshop for Textile Design


Author:
Chipkin
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 11:08:17 04/08/06 Sat

Adobe Photoshop for Textile Design , teaching resource

Presenting Adobe Photoshop for Textile design. This book and CD was created as a textile design learning system. It will show you step by step techniques for creating color combinations, color reduction, repeats, tonal (watercolor) designs and simple woven effects used in fabric design. The CD included with the book includes color charts and practice fabric designs. You can find Adobe Photoshop at http://origininc.tripod.com/BOOK.htm .

Everything in this book is explained in a simple uniform manner so that nothing is overwhelming to the beginner textile designer and so that the more advanced PhotoShop user can grasp key concepts more quickly.

Origin inc. is a design studio that uses only Adobe Photoshop for its design work. As with any design software there are many ways to achieve the desired end effects. This book provides instructions on many tried and true fabric design techniques that Origin inc. uses every day.

Adobe Photoshop for Textile Design teaches the following subjects:
„X Selection and Fill Tools - basic textile design settings
„X Color reducing a textile design in PhotoShop
„X Forced color reduction using the Marquee tool
„X Coloring your textile design
„X Cleaning a textile design
„X Editing tools for textile design
„X Square and Half/drop Repeats in fabric design
„X Creating a plaid
„X Mini bodies - placing a textile design into a fashion sketch
„X Color reduction of a tonal textile design
„X Basic Photo draping - used for fashion designs and home furnishing design - placing a textile you designed on a photograph or home furnishing
„X How Textile Designers can use the color charts included on the CD
„X Creating layers with various tools
„X Adjusting and Tinting layers in your fabric designs
„X Matching colors to a color chart - a must for color accuracy in designing textiles
„X Pulling colors within a layer
„X Using Color Range to select a mask
„X Reducing a layered design down to indexed color (advanced watercolor technique & color reduction of a textile design)
„X Photo Draping using the warp tool - advanced tool for placing a textile you designed on a photograph.
„X Using Bicubic Interpolation to resample an image (resizing a textile design)
„X A note about pixels per inch as related to textile designing
„X Placing colors on the Color Table in the order you want (to make recoloring of a textile design easier)
„X Trapping and Platforming and Fall-ons in textiles

If you would like to view sample pages from Adobe Photoshop for Textile Design please go to http://origininc.tripod.com/adobe_photoshop/textile_design.htm or just go to http://books.google.com/ and type in type in the ISBN 0972731709 . For more general information please go to http://www.designtextile.com

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[> Subject: Enquire


Author:
Rajinder Singh (India)
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Date Posted: 08:25:10 10/27/06 Fri

Dear Sir/Madam,

I am interested to purchage your Adobe photoshop for textile Book and CD so please give me the below information about the same.
1: What is cost of the book and cd.
2:How to purchage ( By Cheque or By Creadit card)
3: Is any office in india.
4: How much time will it take for delevery.

Please reply as early as possible.

With best regards

Rajinder singh

+91 9868728315

India.

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[> Subject: Re: Fabric design learning sytem, Adobe Photoshop for Textile Design


Author:
Jenny (Good Info)
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Date Posted: 11:01:07 07/28/07 Sat

Great info. I work at a fabric store www.jandofabrics.com and we are looking for new ways to design fabrics and play with different colors.

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Subject: Art and Health Lesson Ideas


Author:
Kelly
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Date Posted: 18:18:56 04/21/07 Sat

Hi, I am currently student teaching and the theme of my school this year is "Health and Fitness". I am trying to do sequential lesson plans with my first graders that integrate this theme. This past week we made paper salads with a variety of green paper in different shades and textures. Our class periods are 30 minutes and I would like to think of at least two more one class period lessons that use the theme of health or fitness. Any ideas or lessons would be greatly appreciated!

Thank you,

Kelly in PA

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[> Subject: Re: Art and Health Lesson Ideas


Author:
Kay Kok Chung Oi
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Date Posted: 05:44:46 06/14/07 Thu

I think you have done a very interesting project with your students. Perphas you can try to link this existing project with writing. This means that your students can use the artworks that they have created, paste them in a nice piece of writing paper and write about what they have learned and how they would like to promote good health and fitness. In this way, students can practise their writing skills as well as expressing their personal thoughts. In other words, integrating their personal voices as well as reinforcing what they have learned in their writing classes. I hope this helps.


>Hi, I am currently student teaching and the theme of
>my school this year is "Health and Fitness". I am
>trying to do sequential lesson plans with my first
>graders that integrate this theme. This past week we
>made paper salads with a variety of green paper in
>different shades and textures. Our class periods are
>30 minutes and I would like to think of at least two
>more one class period lessons that use the theme of
>health or fitness. Any ideas or lessons would be
>greatly appreciated!
>
>Thank you,
>
>Kelly in PA

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[> Subject: Re: Art and Health Lesson Ideas


Author:
gabriela
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Date Posted: 22:45:38 06/28/07 Thu

Try teaching Guiseppe Arcimboldo! nice fruit, veggie and food pics!

>Hi, I am currently student teaching and the theme of
>my school this year is "Health and Fitness". I am
>trying to do sequential lesson plans with my first
>graders that integrate this theme. This past week we
>made paper salads with a variety of green paper in
>different shades and textures. Our class periods are
>30 minutes and I would like to think of at least two
>more one class period lessons that use the theme of
>health or fitness. Any ideas or lessons would be
>greatly appreciated!
>
>Thank you,
>
>Kelly in PA

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Subject: New Art21 After-School Initiative Grants Available


Author:
Kelly Williamson
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Date Posted: 16:32:48 06/02/06 Fri

Dear colleagues, please don't hesitate to contact me if you would like more information on the following initiatives. I look forward to hearing from you.

Best,
Kelly
---
Kelly Shindler
Manager of Public Programs and Outreach
Art21, Inc.
286 Spring Street, Suite 405
New York, NY 10013
212.741.7133 x30
f: 212.741.5709
www.pbs.org/art21

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
NEW OPPORTUNITIES FOR 2006!
Art:21—Art in the Twenty-First Century
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
EMAIL YOUR NAME AND AFFILIATION TO OUTREACH@ART21.ORG TO RECEIVE THE CALL FOR PROPOSALS

Explore contemporary art in your community and make valuable connections to local institutions and resources by taking part in one of Art21’s piloting outreach initiatives.

To inspire broad participation, Art21 will offer a limited number of incentive grants and free Art:21 materials. Online project toolkits containing publicity aids, planning materials, and educational resources will be available for download upon registration at www.art21.org later this spring.

NEW FOR 2006...
YOUTH ENGAGEMENT introduces teens, educators, and their communities to contemporary art. Pilot partners participating in this initiative will submit creative ideas for using the Art:21 series to provoke thought and discussion. A wide range of after-school programs and other youth-focused organizations will plan screening events, discussion forums, and hands-on activities for student, parent, and teacher audiences.

ONGOING INITIATIVES...
Independent Screenings - Art21 extends an open invitation for organizations and individuals to host their own Art:21 screenings. In keeping with Art21’s participatory model, partners are encouraged to include discussion forums or other interactive components in their event. Programming ideas and past examples can be found at http://www.pbs.org/art21/events/screenings/index.html. Online screening toolkits for all 12 episodes of the series will be downloadable later this spring.

COMING SUMMER 2007 - SEASON FOUR PREVIEW SCREENINGS
Mark your calendars!
To celebrate Art:21’s Season Four broadcast, museums, schools, community-based organizations, and individuals host preview events before the season premiere to inspire new audiences and alert local communities about the broadcast. Almost 200 organizations in all 50 states and 6 different countries participated in Art21’s Season Three preview screening initiative.

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[> Subject: Re: New Art21 After-School Initiative Grants Available


Author:
rebekah avery (curious)
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 23:17:22 08/02/06 Wed

>Dear colleagues, please don't hesitate to contact me
>if you would like more information on the following
>initiatives. I look forward to hearing from you.
>
>Best,
>Kelly
>---
>Kelly Shindler
>Manager of Public Programs and Outreach
>Art21, Inc.
>286 Spring Street, Suite 405
>New York, NY 10013
>212.741.7133 x30
>f: 212.741.5709
>www.pbs.org/art21
>
>^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
>NEW OPPORTUNITIES FOR 2006!
>Art:21—Art in the Twenty-First Century
>^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
>EMAIL YOUR NAME AND AFFILIATION TO OUTREACH@ART21.ORG
>TO RECEIVE THE CALL FOR PROPOSALS
>
>Explore contemporary art in your community and make
>valuable connections to local institutions and
>resources by taking part in one of Art21’s piloting
>outreach initiatives.
>
>To inspire broad participation, Art21 will offer a
>limited number of incentive grants and free Art:21
>materials. Online project toolkits containing
>publicity aids, planning materials, and educational
>resources will be available for download upon
>registration at www.art21.org later this spring.
>
>NEW FOR 2006...
>YOUTH ENGAGEMENT introduces teens, educators, and
>their communities to contemporary art. Pilot partners
>participating in this initiative will submit creative
>ideas for using the Art:21 series to provoke thought
>and discussion. A wide range of after-school programs
>and other youth-focused organizations will plan
>screening events, discussion forums, and hands-on
>activities for student, parent, and teacher audiences.
>
>ONGOING INITIATIVES...
>Independent Screenings - Art21 extends an open
>invitation for organizations and individuals to host
>their own Art:21 screenings. In keeping with Art21’s
>participatory model, partners are encouraged to
>include discussion forums or other interactive
>components in their event. Programming ideas and past
>examples can be found at
>http://www.pbs.org/art21/events/screenings/index.html.
>Online screening toolkits for all 12 episodes of the
>series will be downloadable later this spring.
>
>COMING SUMMER 2007 - SEASON FOUR PREVIEW SCREENINGS
>Mark your calendars!
>To celebrate Art:21’s Season Four broadcast, museums,
>schools, community-based organizations, and
>individuals host preview events before the season
>premiere to inspire new audiences and alert local
>communities about the broadcast. Almost 200
>organizations in all 50 states and 6 different
>countries participated in Art21’s Season Three preview
>screening initiative.

I am interested in any info about grants for supplies and field trips for my art room. Any info would be cool and appreciated.

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[> [> Subject: Re: New Art21 After-School Initiative Grants Available


Author:
"Project Reclamation"
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 13:08:43 05/03/07 Thu

>>Hello, Our organization is new, although my partner have been volunteers in Sanford for years. We decided to become official as we work with other organizations. We are now working with one of our local public housing communities. We meet with their council weekly to empower the community. We are operating an afterschool program for the children. We have given them numerous hours of service. We would like to know of other ideas that could help us with this community. Thank you in advance for your help.

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Subject: digital art and kids


Author:
Michael Fischer
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Date Posted: 14:03:59 03/05/07 Mon

I am currently involved in the research of art education and technology. It seems to be the consensus of art educators that elementary students should be limited to simple paint programs when attempting digital art. Sophisticated programs such as Photoshop or Bryce should not be introduced until high school. Having successfully taught approximately a thousand kids aged seven to thirteen Photoshop and Bryce, I am especially curious why more have not attempted the same. Galleries of my students’ work are located at www.technocrayons.com .

Have you witnessed any teachers using professional art programs with elementary students? I am aware of Harold Olejarz's work and realize that he is an exception.

Why do you think most educators prefer simple programs for children especially since most people recognize that kids “get” computers much quicker than adults?
Has there been any research on computer art and children?
Are there any "must read" texts (articles and/or books) on art education and technology?
Do most students give up drawing around age nine? Is there any research on this?
Is there anyone that you would recommend I contact about these issues?



Michael Fischer

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Subject: and i buy it here


Author:
and i buy it here (London)
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Date Posted: 02:39:46 02/22/07 Thu

I've posted the series over on my education blog, so commenting is open.

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Subject: Books on lesson plans for Elementary level please!


Author:
Matilde Herrero
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Date Posted: 12:48:15 02/07/07 Wed

Hello all art educators:

I am a first year art teacher at an elementary level in a public school, rural, setting, and I am in desperate need of some good recommendation on books with lesson planning for this level. I have Helen Hume's Elementary Survival Guide, and have looked on several wonderful web sites including this one, but I am running out of ideas and it is only the beginning of the second semester! (I am very limited in materials)

Anything you can recollect would be of great help! Thank you in advance.

MHerrero

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Subject: obtencion de la historia


Author:
historia de la plastilina
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Date Posted: 17:20:51 05/29/03 Thu

deseo obtener la historia de la plastilina si fuera posible les agradezco.

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[> Subject: Re: obtencion de la historia


Author:
Ken Rohrer
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Date Posted: 21:12:16 01/31/07 Wed

żCuándo usted pregunta por la historia del plastilina, qué usted significa? Plastilina es la arcilla que se utiliza en esculpir. Sea más específico sobre lo que usted desea saber.

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Subject: Re: obtencion de la historia


Author:
erenesto
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Date Posted: 10:54:23 01/17/07 Wed

>>deseo obtener la historia de la plastilina si fuera
>>posible les agradezco.
>urgente!!!

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Subject: Latest News


Author:
Ken Rohrer
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Date Posted: 01:20:16 11/06/06 Mon

The Incredible Art Department now has a moderated online forum. I think it is much more effective than this bulletin board. Go to http://incredibleart.proboards83.com/index.cgi? and request approval.

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Subject: J.P. Ludu


Author:
Durell Koger (?question)
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 15:29:54 09/16/06 Sat

I have three pictures by J.P. Ludu which were aquired in 1981 in Kampala by my now deceased husbund. Need to find out about this artist. Can anybody out there help.

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Subject: six week lesson plans


Author:
Lori Pickering
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Date Posted: 18:41:01 08/24/05 Wed

I have been used to teaching students for an entire semester every other day. I just found out yesterday that our new school will have me teaching art to 6 groups of 6,7,8 graders for one six week period, then they will move to another exploratory. Does anyone have an idea for a plan that will touch as many areas as possible in 6wks? I will have a different group of 6 every six weeks. Our new school will have about 550 students. I really looked through IAD but I didn't find yearly plan that were broken into 6wks. Do I nend to repeat the same plan 6 times for the entire year? Help! Lori

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[> Subject: Re: six week lesson plans


Author:
LAURA MCHUGH
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Date Posted: 08:43:04 02/26/06 Sun

>HI, MY NAME IS LAURA MCHUGH AND I TEACH 6,7,&8TH GRADE ART. I ONLY SEE THE KIDS FOR 15 DAYS. EITHER 15 DAYS IN A ROW OR 15 DAYS ONCE A WEEK. IT IS TOUGH. I TRY TO EXPOSE THEM TO AS MANY FUN AND CREATIVE PROJECTS AS POSSIBLE IN THAT SHORT OF TIME. I FEEL I WANT TO LET THEM HAVE FUN WHILE LEARNING IN THIS CRAZY SHORT PERIOD OF TIME. ITS HARD TO GET ART HISTORY IN BUT I TRY AS BEST I CAN. IF YOU WANT I CAN SEND YOU SOME LESSONS. ALOT OF THE PROJECTS I USE IS FROM IAD. GOOD LUCK IF YOU NEED ME WRITE. THANKS LAURA

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[> Subject: Re: six week lesson plans


Author:
kelly
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Date Posted: 22:39:35 09/15/06 Fri

I personally would go nuts repeating the same lessons every 6 weeks. However, I imagine it would make for an easier time with lesson planning. It would be fine to do that but I personally enjoy trying new projects in the classroom. I only repeat the lessons that I feel are successful and ones the kids really enjoyed. I suppose my approach would be to try lessons that aren't time consuming so that they get exposed to a variety of media in that short amount of time. Ideas..... drawing project maybe a one-point or two-point perspective, a watercolor abstract painting, a pinch pot or coil pot ( but clay takes time), a collage self- portrait ..That would prob be all you would have time for but it exposes them to alot of different mediums. another suggestion to save time is to make projects smaller in size. My 6th grade is set up for 6 weeks and I personally really enjoy it esp if I have a student that drives me nuts:) hehe


>I have been used to teaching students for an entire
>semester every other day. I just found out yesterday
>that our new school will have me teaching art to 6
>groups of 6,7,8 graders for one six week period, then
>they will move to another exploratory. Does anyone
>have an idea for a plan that will touch as many areas
>as possible in 6wks? I will have a different group of
>6 every six weeks. Our new school will have about 550
>students. I really looked through IAD but I didn't
>find yearly plan that were broken into 6wks. Do I nend
>to repeat the same plan 6 times for the entire year?
>Help! Lori

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Subject: mural/panel/websites


Author:
avery
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 13:04:05 08/04/06 Fri

My summer art camp painted a mural for the hall on a panel 4x6'. We primed the wood and painted with house paint, but I have not sealed it with anything. I am concerned that it will get scratched or someone will put their own brand of creativity on the work. What is the best thing to seal it with. I also thought about covering with plexiglass, however, that will cost about 60 bucks.

Also, I would like to create a web site for my class. Any advice would be appreciated. Avery

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Subject: Mural painting


Author:
Fran Young
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Date Posted: 14:30:32 05/11/05 Wed

Can anyone help with advise on how to prevent water damage to a student-painted mural on a concrete wall? We thought we had sealed thoroughly, but the painted surface is lifting. Argh! Thanks for your advise!

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[> Subject: Re: Mural painting


Author:
Edman
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 05:45:59 11/22/05 Tue

>Can anyone help with advise on how to prevent water
>damage to a student-painted mural on a concrete wall?
>We thought we had sealed thoroughly, but the painted
>surface is lifting. Argh! Thanks for your advise!
You didnt mention if the mural is outdoors, indoors, or if you primed the concrete before applying the paint. Sealing the paint wont do much good if the substrate (concrete) was not prepared so that the paint would adhere to it properly. Sorry but there is not much you can do at this point except pray.

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[> [> Subject: Re: Mural painting


Author:
avery
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 12:56:03 08/04/06 Fri

>>Can anyone help with advise on how to prevent water
>>damage to a student-painted mural on a concrete wall?
>>We thought we had sealed thoroughly, but the painted
>>surface is lifting. Argh! Thanks for your advise!
>You didnt mention if the mural is outdoors, indoors,
>or if you primed the concrete before applying the
>paint. Sealing the paint wont do much good if the
>substrate (concrete) was not prepared so that the
>paint would adhere to it properly. Sorry but there is
>not much you can do at this point except pray.





I have a question about murals/panels myself. True about the priming of the surface first...that's a must.

We painted a panel in the hall 4x6. We primed and painted the panel, now I am concerned that someone may scratch it or add their own brand of creativity to it. What's the best thing to do: seal with polyurathane or something else, or cover with a piece of plexiglass? The plexi will cost about 50 bucks. Avery

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Subject: Help with Art Curriculum Writing


Author:
Jo
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Date Posted: 03:36:23 06/06/06 Tue

Dear all,
I am a beginning teacher in Singapore. I hold a degree in architecture but had no proper education in the visual arts. I am nevertheless, very interested in the subject, thus teaching it.Was recently tasked to write the art and crafts curriculum for upper primary children (ages 10 to 12..am not sure what grade that would equate to in the states...my apologies). My question is this, would putting elements of art history and criticism be a good idea? is it too tedious and boring for them? My management and other teachers are quite against the whole idea. Your views on this?

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[> Subject: Re: Help with Art Curriculum Writing


Author:
Ken Rohrer
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Date Posted: 17:50:58 06/23/06 Fri

In my opinion, childen aged 10-12 have a shorter attention span because they are entering adolescence. Because of this, I believe that a general approach is called for when you teach criticism and history. However, teaching the elements of art are good for any age.

Ken

>Dear all,
> I am a beginning teacher in Singapore. I hold a
>degree in architecture but had no proper education in
>the visual arts. I am nevertheless, very interested in
>the subject, thus teaching it.Was recently tasked to
>write the art and crafts curriculum for upper primary
>children (ages 10 to 12..am not sure what grade that
>would equate to in the states...my apologies). My
>question is this, would putting elements of art
>history and criticism be a good idea? is it too
>tedious and boring for them? My management and other
>teachers are quite against the whole idea. Your views
>on this?

[ Post a Reply to This Message ]
[> Subject: Re: Help with Art Curriculum Writing


Author:
Kay Kok Chung Oi
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 03:55:41 07/26/06 Wed

>Dear all,
> I am a beginning teacher in Singapore. I hold a
>degree in architecture but had no proper education in
>the visual arts. I am nevertheless, very interested in
>the subject, thus teaching it.Was recently tasked to
>write the art and crafts curriculum for upper primary
>children (ages 10 to 12..am not sure what grade that
>would equate to in the states...my apologies). My
>question is this, would putting elements of art
>history and criticism be a good idea? is it too
>tedious and boring for them? My management and other
>teachers are quite against the whole idea. Your views
>on this?

I don't think incorporating art history and criticism is a bad idea, provided you are able to faciliate students to see how history remains relevant in the present contexts or how history helps to make progress in near future. As for criticism, you may need to think along the line of criticism as "Critical Thinking" or "Self Reflection". This means you can integrate art history into self thinking by encouraging students to discuss the contents of art history as to the present. It goes back to helping students to find relevancy in the subject in their own personal experiences or observations.

I hope this helps.

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Subject: Student feedback


Author:
Lauren
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 11:03:04 04/25/06 Tue

I am a teaching assistant in my final semester before student teaching. I am trying to emphasize student interaction/feedback and critique in my classroom. I'm teaching 8th grade and we are working on coiled clay pots. What are some techniques I can use to have my students help each other and give each other feedback on their work? How do you get students in 8th grade to hold a positive and productive critique? Thanks!

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Subject: Praxis ll for art teachers


Author:
MEA
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 18:59:10 01/04/06 Wed

Can anyone give me information on the Praxis ll for Art Teachers. What is a good study guide and is there one. How difficult is this test.

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[> Subject: Re: Praxis ll for art teachers


Author:
Lauren
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 10:54:01 04/25/06 Tue

I just took the Praxis 2 and it was not very difficult. If you've completed all the required studio and taken a variety of art history courses to get your art ed degree, you'll be fine. To prepare I went through the Book of Lists and that helped a little. To get an idea of what the test will be like go to the Praxis website and they have about 10 practice questions. At the time of taking it, i felt like i did horrible, but I easily passed. Good luck!
Lauren

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Subject: History of Plasticine


Author:
Terry Harbutt
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 18:14:17 05/18/02 Sat

My great Grandfather was the inventor of Plasticine (William Harbutt in 1897). If you still require more information contact me vis email
Regards
Terry Harbutt

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[> Subject: Re: History of Plasticine


Author:
historia de la plastilina
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 08:44:50 08/06/02 Tue

> mi gran abuelo era el inventor del plasticine > (Guillermo Harbutt en 1897). Si usted requiere aún así más > información éntreme en contacto con vis email > respeto > Terry Harbutt
Por favor enviar historia de la plastilina lo mas completo possible

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[> Subject: Re: History of Plasticine


Author:
Sue Howarth
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 14:37:39 09/20/02 Fri

I work at what was the Royal School in Bath (now the Royal High School, Bath) and have heard that plasticine was invented by a teacher (art teacher?) at this school. Was this your grandfather? I'd be very interested to know.

Thanks

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[> [> Subject: Re: History of Plasticine


Author:
Purple Hippo
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 16:57:20 05/19/05 Thu

>I work at what was the Royal School in Bath (now the
>Royal High School, Bath) and have heard that
>plasticine was invented by a teacher (art teacher?) at
>this school. Was this your grandfather? I'd be very
>interested to know.
>
>Thanks


Yeah, he is my grandfather. Why do you want to know?

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[> Subject: who makes plasticine in Canada?


Author:
peter ton
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 13:00:22 05/20/05 Fri

who makes/manufactures/distributes plasticine in Canada?

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[> Subject: Re: History of Plasticine


Author:
pep
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 15:21:44 11/22/05 Tue

My son is 4 years old and is studying in school The name of his clas is William harbutt the plasticine inventor, but his teacher no forgit another photo that the sculpture of mr. Harbutt and need more information. I am interestint to find the history and photos.

Please can you help me?
excuse me because i write very bad in english I live in Barcelona.

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Subject: Please give me feedback on my Art Ed website


Author:
C.E.
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 07:47:10 11/18/05 Fri

I have a site for the ceramics and photography classes that I teach.

Will you give me feedback on it please?

my teaching site: http://www.thinkartmakeart.com

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Subject: Looking for grades 3-6 resources


Author:
Amy
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 07:10:37 07/29/05 Fri

Hi Everyone! I'm moving up to grades 3-6 from pre-k through 2. I'm looking for good resources (books, websites-aside from IAD, of course!) that would help me put together a new curriculum. Mostly, I'm looking for ideas for the 1st month of classes. Also, stressing out about lack of supplies (my school spends $1 per child a year on the Visual Arts) Should I send a note home the 1st week requesting certain materials from each child????
Thanks,
Amy

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Subject: Using Blogs as a way to build community with other art classes


Author:
Ashley
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 15:22:31 07/13/05 Wed

Hi. I am wondering if anyone has used blogs or a photo publishing site (an example would be Artsonia) to share student artwork with a group of students from another school. I am going to be doing this as part of my masters program in Educational Technology. My participant will be an Advanced Placement Studio Art class I teach. (I only have 3 students in that class, so I need a larger audience for critique and discussion.) I will be using blogger.com and Flickr.com to publish the photos and receive/give critiques and this will be linked to my blogger account for more in depth discussion on particular artwork.

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Subject: Making portable portfolios for student work


Author:
Erin
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Date Posted: 21:52:46 06/27/05 Mon

Hello! Need some input...I wanted to have my students make a "nicer" portable portfolio in the beginning of the next school year. I only send work home twice a year, but want them to use the portfolio both times and just store it in my classroom during the year. Any great ideas would be appreciated...need to accomodate 12 by 18 inch papers. Something that is somewhat durable, enclosed and maybe a handle would be great!!! Thanks in advance!

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Subject: Layoffs


Author:
Christy
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Date Posted: 19:47:12 05/02/05 Mon

How's everyones jobs?
Do to recent budget cuts in my district I have been laid off. I teach Middle School art 7th grade. Has this happened to anyone else?
Christy

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Subject: kindergarten lesson


Author:
Alexandra
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Date Posted: 19:26:29 03/27/05 Sun

Eeek! My supervisor is observing me- I need a GREAT kindergarten lesson. Any ideas?
Thanks!:)

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Subject: traveling art teachers


Author:
Tiffany
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Date Posted: 20:53:27 02/23/05 Wed

So I teach in an expanding district, yeah! Because this our elementary schools are different sizes. Some of the art teachers travel, some don't, some travel only sometimes, I travel everyday. We calculate our time in 30 minute sections of contact time. Elementary art teachers schedules vary from middle 40s of sections up to 52- I have 52. Our travel time is concidered part of our prep time. Another district that I tau˙

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Subject: Lower level lesson plan for harmony


Author:
S Whitman
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Date Posted: 12:02:36 02/21/05 Mon

I need a lesson plan idea for a 2nd or 3rd grade art class that does a good job of introducing or developing "harmony.
Any ideas would be greatly appreciated!
"

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Subject: Incredible Art


Author:
Royce
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Date Posted: 20:34:06 02/20/05 Sun

Thanks to the team for the new look - you guys are great!! Thanks to Judy for all her unending work she does for art and art education - we around the world thankyou. Thanks everyone. Ka kite ano. Arohanui oe. Royce in Australia but from New Zealand.

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Subject: Beginner Art Questions


Author:
Mike
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Date Posted: 21:04:08 01/21/02 Mon

We recently purchased a beginner art set for our eight year old. The set includes water and oil based paints, color pencils, poster paints, charcol, etc. In addition it includes two items that we're not sure how to use - Spindle Oil and Linseed Oil.

Can you offer some insight for us? If so, your fast response will be appreciated.

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[> Subject: Re: Beginner Art Questions


Author:
Ken Rohrer
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Date Posted: 23:40:15 02/16/02 Sat

You mix the Spindle Oil and Linseed Oil with your oil based paints. Mix enough oil until the paint is the consistency you desire but no more than a 50% mixture.

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[> Subject: Re: Beginner Art Questions


Author:
Juanita
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Date Posted: 14:19:26 09/04/02 Wed

what is popular culture?

what is high and low art?

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[> [> Subject: Re: Beginner Art Questions


Author:
gemma
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Date Posted: 14:24:06 12/27/04 Mon

>what removes coloured pencil marks from paper?

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Subject: organizational tips needed!


Author:
Elementary Art Teacher
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Date Posted: 20:23:10 12/17/04 Fri

What are some of your best tips for organizing your classroom, the flow of your lessons, and your supplies

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Subject: String Art


Author:
^_^
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Date Posted: 19:16:09 02/08/03 Sat

You can use anything for string art! Balsa wood, probably. Cardboard is a good material...haha cheap too. Get 'em of boxes. Hard paper...other boards...yeah...dunno...*LOL*

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[> Subject: Re: String Art


Author:
andy
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Date Posted: 13:45:32 12/02/04 Thu

Im doing a string art project and I need directions on how to make string art just email me if u wanna help.

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Subject: middle school drawing


Author:
Sia Walker-Griffith
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Date Posted: 15:02:44 11/30/04 Tue

Ok,
I need help with drawing lessons for middle school...This has always been a struggle for me to teach for some reason. I am teaching contour drawing now, but I just can't seem to reach the kids. Any suggestions??

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Subject: Baruch College Continuing Ed offers Performing Arts & Writing courses


Author:
Jason Grossman
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Date Posted: 16:08:25 01/05/04 Mon

Baruch College Continuing and Professional Studies offers Performing Arts courses
beginning in late January.

From beginners to professionals, everyone can enjoy courses in acting, improv comedy,
voiceovers, play and comedy writing, movement and journalism.

Sign up now for our comprehensive classes with an emphasis on particular attention
to each students’ needs! Attend our courses taught by well-known entertainers
and industry professionals. For more information, call 646-312-5000 or visit http://caps.baruch.cuny.edu
or http://www.funnysheesh.com.


COURSES

Stage Movement I (ART0004) - Elizabeth Mozer - Thursdays, beg Jan. 29, 7:15pm-9:15pm
(4 sessions)
Stage Movement II (ART0004) - Elizabeth Mozer - Thursdays, beg. Feb. 26, 7:15pm-9:15pm
(4 sessions)
* Elizabeth Mozer is a Broadway actress, dancer and resident movement director and
coach at the Judith Shakespeare Company.

Voiceovers for Radio and Television I (ART0010) - MaryLou DiFilippo - Saturdays,
beg. Feb. 7, 1:30pm-4:30pm (4 sessions)
Voiceovers for Radio and Television II (ART0010) - MaryLou DiFilippo - Saturdays,
beg. March 6, 1:30pm-4:30pm (4 sessions)
* MaryLou DiFilippo has been a union actor and teacher for over two decades and
a successful commercial voice-over and narrator.

Broadcast Journalism: Performance and News Writing I (ART0027) - Philip Rosenbaum
- Thursdays, beg. Jan. 29, 6:00pm-9:00pm (4 sessions)
Broadcast Journalism: Performance and News Writing II (ART0027) - Philip Rosenbaum
- Thursdays, beg. March 4, 6:00pm-9:00pm (4 sessions)
* Philip Rosenbaum is an accomplished journalist and the news producer for “The
Money Gang” on CNNfn.

Intro to Acting I (ART0007) - Karen Christie Ward - Tuesdays, beg. Jan. 27, 6:30pm-9:30pm
(4 sessions) (Note: skip 2/17/03)
Intro to Acting II (ART0007) - Karen Christie Ward - Tuesdays, beg. March 2, 6:30pm-9:30pm
(4 sessions)
* Karen Christie-Ward is an experienced teacher and professional actress.

Playwriting IA (ART0001) - Sharon Fogarty - Wednesdays, beg. Jan. 28, 6:30 PM -
9:30 PM (4 sessions)
Playwriting IB (ART0001) - Sharon Fogarty - Wednesdays, beg. Feb. 25, 6:30 PM -
9:30 PM (4 sessions)
* Sharon Fogarty is a published playwright of some 20 plays, choreographer and performing
arts instructor at SUNY Buffalo, Sarah Lawrence College, Bronx Conservatory of Music
and Arts Genesis in New York.

Intro to Drama/History of the Theatre I (ART0008) - Stephen Smith - Mondays, beg.
Jan. 26, 6:00pm-9:00pm (4 sessions)
Intro to Drama/History of the Theatre II (ART0008) - Stephen Smith - Mondays, beg.
March 1, 6:00pm-9:00pm (4 sessions)
* Stephen Smith is a well-known television and stage actor, playwright and director
and is a member of Actors’ Equity, AFTRA, and The Dramatist’s Guild.

Sect. 1: Intro to Improv I (ART0005) - Jason Grossman - Saturdays, beg. Jan. 31,
10:00am-1:00pm (4 sessions)
Sect. 2: Intro to Improv I (ART0005) - Jason Grossman - Sundays, beg. Feb. 1, 2:00pm-5:00pm
(4 sessions)
Sect. 1: Intro to Improv II (ART0005) - Jason Grossman - Saturdays, beg. Feb. 28,
10:00am-1:00pm (4 sessions)
Sect. 2: Intro to Improv II (ART0005) - Jason Grossman - Sundays, beg. Feb. 29,
2:00pm-5:00pm (4 sessions)
* Jason Grossman (Program Coordinator) is an acclaimed actor, producer, teacher
and founder and director of the Funny...Sheesh Performance Collective and Improv
Company.

Sketch Comedy Writing I (ART0014) - Jason Grossman - Mondays, beg. Jan. 26, 6:00pm-9:00pm
(4 sessions)
Sketch Comedy Writing II (ART0014) - Jason Grossman - Mondays, beg. March 1, 6:00pm-9:00pm
(4 sessions)

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[> Subject: Re: Baruch College Continuing Ed offers Performing Arts & Writing courses


Author:
Melissa
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Date Posted: 13:00:55 11/23/04 Tue

I am interested in registering for this certificate program. I wanted to know if the program was still running and what steps I would need to take to register.

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Subject: Welcome to the Art Education Bulletin Board


Author:
Ken Rohrer
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Date Posted: 18:36:29 09/19/04 Sun

Welcome to the bulletin board of the Incredible Art Department. You can access the archive of posts here:

http://www.voy.com/fo/fc/msgman.html?fid=36379&arch=1

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Subject: new to teaching


Author:
cellina
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Date Posted: 00:08:23 08/10/04 Tue

I am currently completing my bachelor of education in Australia. I am interested in how teachers approach students who feel they are not creative. Any other tips are welcomed. Thanks.
cc.

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Subject: Jaisini "Marble Lady"


Author:
gleitzeit
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Date Posted: 22:34:38 04/27/04 Tue

Jaisini "Marble Lady"

Marble Woman, The Notorious Marble Lady, My Marble Lady, Lady Known as Marble, the So-Called Marble Lady, etc.

Art in the twentieth century has been awarded the highest esteem as something we should admire and respect and I found a lot of evidence of the truthfulness of such thought. I emailed my essay called "Marble Lady" on Paul Jaisini’s oil painting with the same title in frequency of 500-1000 emails a day with a limited impact in consideration to the vast amount of Internet subscribers.

What I have found was an unprecedented response from the recipients, the readers who were intrigued and even entrapped by this sort of a psychological game, trying to decipher the meaning of the message, it’s content, how it relates to them personally, who is the messenger, why was it sent to them and why they were targeted to such atypical advertisement.

I did not expect such amount of feedback, which kept me busy for months. It also was a degree of obligation to continue as the action had caught public’s interest. This art mission grew into a sort of conceptual art when I am describing an oil painting authored by Jaisini without providing any visual information.

It seems to me that this was one of the reasons for creation of fancy about the given art work that was named by readers in many special ways as The Marble Lady, Marble Woman, The Notorious Marble Lady, My marble lady, lady Known as Marble, the so-called marble lady, Marble Statue and so forth.

It is some sort of phenomenon of the essay hitting unexpectedly PC users, as some preserved, sacred message, which is not revealed but represented as an idea and mysterious message from ‘above.’

I didn’t intend to engage in conceptual art activity, but it happened without my insinuation. People had started the dialogue that can only be called interaction. I was asked for explanation. A work of art normally behaves as if it’s a visual statement. This is a sculpture of Thinker by Rodin or this is a portrait of Mona Lisa. The viewer may ask, who was this Mona Lisa and why did she become so precious. But these questions follow on from an acceptance of the visual object.

In my case, there was no visual object offered for review, but an essay as ipso facto. And the visualization was up to the reader. I offered the description as representation, which seems a tautology and the chain of description was further elaborated by each reader in his degree of potential and "Marble lady" was "Marble lady" was "marble lady" ed infinitum.

The response could also be believed as nervous breakdown characteristic of contemporary people who have lost faith in any offered commodity, nor in art claimed to be, neither in social institution.

The connection of image with effective action on viewers is disturbed. People seem to prefer a legend. The formalistic presentation can no longer explain life in our rapidly changing world. To the opposite of a true conceptual art which was a violent reaction against modernist notions of progress, this new action was populist and not against an art object status, but for creation of an aura of legend and good reception.

This action thus is purely aesthetic without discrimination of the recipients. I have received responses ranging from teen-agers to retired journalists. The romantic, poetic message reached throughout the cyber space with little effort in professionalism of presentation, but with a strong power of personal correspondence.

The reader can find in the essay the artistic representation with no political or apolitical aspiration. The conceptuality of this action is even more paradoxical as in respects of certain degree of privacy’s intrusion.

With emailing an art essay I was trying to impose art on non-wanting receptors unlike the denial of Conceptual art and it’s opposition towards art tradition.

The reception of the message "Marble Lady" turned to be the best. It may be the method of this everyday nature that prefigured good reception of the one who got the mail in the box. If he reads an art essay in a snobby art magazine written with the same artsy words, it would not reach him.

Instead of usual commercial offers the Internet user receives the poetic message that he’d love to think has come from some one he knows personally, or a secret admirer. The expectation here is exaggerated and he thinks more of the essay than it is realistically. He sees it through the rosy glasses of sensual willingness. This may be the highest point of a fusing the life of the home, office, classroom with the hermetic life of the art studio, by the help of informative mediator.

The essay sneaked onto the recipient without any commercial tyranny as personal letter. The reader chooses to open and read it.

The reason of course is the title "Marble Lady." Naming the essay with the painting’s title "Marble Lady" I tried to put the painting at the service of the mind. Duchamp rejected no painting per se, but stupid painting. I found a chance for critical research in works of Paul Jaisini, which allow me to think in words and images. Jaisini’s paintings are smart enough to teach, to reconstruct the mind and start up a new art concept.

The written essay cannot substitute the visual image and by no definition can be called an independent work of art, but its art’s aura. It didn’t intend to create a debate, but ultimately did, the aura is important in the pleasurable straight reception of visual art work by people.

New York 2004
Text Copyright: Yustas Kotz-Gottlieb

Marble Lady by Jaisini
Blue Reincarnation Narcussis by Jaisini
911 oil painting by Jaisini
Freedom of Thought by Jaisini
Hot Dog Party by Jaisini
Drunken Santa by Jaisini
Pinocchio by Jaisini
Wet Dream by Jaisini

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Subject: integrating drama


Author:
Sandra Kitchen
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Date Posted: 15:00:14 04/09/04 Fri

My school has recently established an arts and humanities department in the primary grades. I would like some suggestions on ways to integrate drama across the curriculum.

Thanks

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Subject: Marble Lady Oil Painting by Paul Jaisini


Author:
yustas
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Date Posted: 21:41:08 03/13/04 Sat

Marble Lady Oil Painting by Paul Jaisini
Kotz-Gottlieb keeps the page-turner of a dialogue with many voices vital and engaging in opposition of opinions and search for something that explains mystery of Jaisini's invibisle art. There is a flurry of surprising interpretations, reactions, emotions, personal revelations all directed to try to unravel puzzles of Gleitzeit art of Paul Jaisini, also known as Invisible, asking how much of this is fact and how much is fiction? It's challenging, exciting, and a whole lot more. What if invisible painting was real? Such a possibility yielding an extremely controversial discussion provides the framework for Kotz-Gottlieb's series of books on the art of Paul Jaisini. Art finally enters new unknown dimension and the book about it keeps someone in suspense, while someone is inspired to break through the barriers of unknown, and someone craving for more of the mysterious puzzles of Jaisini.
http://www.lulu.com/Paul-Jaisini

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Subject: Re: Ghana


Author:
Ken Rohrer
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Date Posted: 20:36:39 02/28/04 Sat

The web site you submitted is excellent. Any teacher who wants to learn about the arts in Ghana must see this site!

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Subject: Ghana


Author:
Ellie
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Date Posted: 14:22:11 02/24/04 Tue

We are an educational non-profit that encourages cross cultural collaboration.
Please see our website at http://www.culturalcollaborative.org

If you teach about Ghana,we'd love to have comments from you and your students.If you'd like to go to Ghana and meet some artists,we can help you do that.

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Subject: how to pass the praxis


Author:
jeff hartley
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Date Posted: 13:32:35 01/02/04 Fri

I have taken the praxis four times and missed it by 1 to 2 points each time. What do you have to do to pass it?

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Subject: history of art from stone age to now


Author:
carlos
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Date Posted: 11:41:44 12/19/03 Fri

does anybody know were I can buy slides about art history (stone age to now)

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Subject: questions about art teachers in NYS/NYC


Author:
dana
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Date Posted: 19:24:44 12/11/03 Thu

Hello,
I will be graduating with a BFA in photography this may. I want to further my education to recieve a masters in art education, so that I can be an art teacher. I want to teach in NYC for the beginning years and eventaully move out to Long Island. I know that school districts in Manhattan cut the art department alot...I was wondering if you thougth I would ahev a problem finding a job?
Thanks so much!

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Subject: Photoshop Tutorials on the Web


Author:
Flippy
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Date Posted: 10:12:42 08/20/03 Wed

Some really good Photoshop and Web tutorials here - http://www.fortunada.com/tutorials/. The site is Fortunada, and the tutorials and lessons in include help on Phototshop, ImageReady, Fireworks, HTML, Web design, and there are also some great links to Internet deals and shopping.

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Subject: Dibdabdoo.com


Author:
Angela
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Date Posted: 14:22:29 07/19/03 Sat

Hi all I visit these forums on a regular basis but first time post for me. Since this forum is for us teachers, thought I would let you all know about a great resource I found and use on a regular basis.

http://www.dibdabdoo.com

Child friendly search engine with a great education directory listing all sorts of educational topics.

Thanks Angela

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Subject: Your comments were published on The Art of Paul Jaisini by Yustas Kotz-Gottlieb


Author:
gleitzeit
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Date Posted: 03:40:31 07/15/03 Tue

Your comments were published on The Art of Paul Jaisini by Yustas Kotz-Gottlieb
Thank you for your opinion and response.

RIGHTS AND COPYRIGHT
We ask for reproduction and archival rights. Author retains all other rights.
IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS CONTACT
Yustas Kotz-Gottlieb
gttlieb@aol.com
http://jaisini.artbabyart.net/
http://jaisini.artbabyart.net/
Art of Paul Jaisini by Yustas Kotz-Gottlieb
http://jaisini.artbabyart.net/about.html
Who is Artist Paul Jaisini
New York Code Orange Jaisini new art series

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Subject: Art & Design Schools


Author:
Justin Palmer
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Date Posted: 16:40:23 07/07/03 Mon

Lance,

These are just a few design websites that I have found useful. I have listed them by function.

Animation Schools

Web Design Schools

Graphic Design Schools

Design Schools


Hope you find these websites useful. Good luck on your search.

P.S. I hope this message finds you as I can't recall the discussion group you were at.

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Subject: brigitte


Author:
trouble
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Date Posted: 11:07:09 06/27/03 Fri

do you still write poetry?
i like your old stuff.
haven't seen anything new
from you.

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Subject: yustas


Author:
brigitte
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Date Posted: 20:54:09 06/20/03 Fri

Well there is this elitist writer who sends me regularly copies of his writings.
Well they are very intellectual breaking taboos etc, he is using a character a painter who is always in a transe..
After a while, driving this writer crazy (not easy to do, a tough nut), I said your painter is locked in the cell of your brain..He said how did you know?
then he starts his cruel game, I asked him what is the colour of your eyes, he said blue.I said fine...
He continues sending me his elitist writings, telling me to come to New York....to become a great artist..oh yes I paint too he would arrange everything, pay etc...I said I do not want your charity..what is your gain..he said it may shatter your dreams but well I am not into ladies...I said I was not dreaming.What is the colour of your eyes, he said green..
I said you are a liar, and he wrote it is the women who oppress the male thinkers??
I did not get that too.....
What is he all about, I really do not know...But I am sure he is experimenting on me....
Boy I could rewrite war and peace.....

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Subject: Commets on Jaisini


Author:
gleitzeit
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Date Posted: 00:25:01 06/16/03 Mon

From: TStruszka@compuserve.com (TS)
Very entertaining If this painting really exists, I'd like to know where I can see it.

From: MGHsheep

YOU'RE SAYING THAT THE SUBCONSCIOUS MIND WILL PICK UP A PAINTING THAT DOESN'T EXIST? OR PERHAPS IF IT DOES EXIST, SUB-C WILL PICK UP ALL THE ABSTRACT THINGS OF VALUE?

From: christopherscott@usa.net (Christopher Scott)

Why the concern with the Marble Lady? I realize that your concern with marbles stems from having lost your own long, long ago. I am curious, do you think your ability to read popular interpretations into something in order to fit your own world view makes you intelligent or creative? Do you hang out with people who think like you or do you search out new ideas that are utterly new? Are 'female identity fiction' and 'Post-feminism' terms you can even define, or did you find them in some first year Woman's Studies Course? I am not a subscriber to the "thingy Power Quarterly" although I found it amusing. In fact, those were the only three entertaining words in your message. Why are you so serious? I don't know you from Adam (or perhaps I should say Eve lest I succumb to male dominated moral hegemony). Perhaps you subscribe to "Vagina Power Weekly". I don't know. Why the obsession with the male/female power struggle? How could you possibly know what the artist intended to show, or what he meant by all the elements? There tremendous leaps in logic in your prose, in which one interpretation supports another supposition ad nauseum until it appears you have proven a point. Much of academia is built on such logic and this inherent flaw has weakened many of the social sciences. The logic of such arguments is based on the presumption that as long as the central hypothesis is 'correct' it does not matter what flaws exist in the logic used to arrive at said hypothesis. I suggest that you paint your own picture...write your own story... create your own dream...you obviously have the potential as a thinker but are hindered out of your concern with being 'correct' and seem to think that the cannon of 'great' works defines the only important source of inspiration. THINGS TO PONDER....


From: amarlow8@aa.net (Stefan Knorr)

Zeit begleitet mich. Ich gleite mit der Zeit. Ich bin der gleitzeitgeist.

From: ABApainter

its an art beyond depressionism it harmonizes the concrete in an non objective way with an all over omni directional megalomania. its esoteric drama is totally on the surface and deterritorialized as sign through superlinearity it folds and unfolds like a card table as abstract machine functioning within the autonomous strata of art against art. it refuses to have a frame and can be seen by the blind it begs to be put in the center and speaks of proximity and law without concepts. its topic is the void an enterprise with an Asiatic non despotic formation beyond Marx Freud and henry ford. its an art that can hear but cannot say and spreads across the floor like milk without heat yet not cold. a hyper bourgeoisie flow overcoding mutation as assemblage where no assemblage be a sort of beginners guide in a manner of speaking to unequal exchange but on the other hand non controlling escaping to the periphery.

From: flwolf@gulfaccess.net

I still don't understand what Gleitzeit has to do with a missionary issue.
This word is used only in regard to working times in a company and means, that employees can choose a certain frame when they want to work.


From: Drennen, Graig @diacenter. org

I am interested in your manifesto, but I have a question> What is wrong with having a beginning and an end?


From: andrew2eyelab.psy.msu.edu (Andrew Hollingworth)

Sounds like this art is everything and nothing, the whole and the parts of the whole. that which was and that which will forever be, a visual deconstruction of the post-structural, the abstract grounded in the actual, the realization of unreality...
Andrew Hollingworth Department of Psychology Michigan State University


From: pingwen@rice. edu

that's really interesting. Not that in philosophy we always find 'the answers' but I know that even Confucious once said that he never met a man who cared more about his studies than he thought about woman. So I agree... indeed this is what the universe is mostly driven on...In art there is often the symbolism of "sacred and profane love"...
Symbolized so often by, ... I forget,.. Venus and Aphrodite??? And that's pretty reflective I think. So in those times when "thingy quarterly" comes out and the young men stare hours on end at the porno before them,... In those times, I'm sure us when they feel the least lonely and the most satisfied in the hunger of their seeking souls. And in those hours after having stared and done whatever else I'm sure is when they feel the most filled and happy. What do you think? Society's repression? (effectively oppression?),... or is there something indeed such as 'sacred' love which fills? maybe marriage,... maybe God, if Heís there... My own experience is ëyesí, maybe something of the imagination? hopefully something Real? All western philosophy begins with the question "Is there a God?" from that comes the 2 universes in which people may choose to live talk with me some more...


From: Guido.Poggi@netit.alcatel.it

very interesting manifesto
would like to know who you are and to have some additional informations
respect to the manifesto and to Mr. Y. Kotz-Gottlieb, who to contact and how (Urls or E-mail) I wish to join the movement.


From: jimmyc73@hotmail.com

I received your short version Gleitzeit manifesto. It sounded good. I am a painter from South Australia and often go through stages of self doubt (mainly due to the gimmicks of conceptual artists and the nihilism of the avant-garde) but am unusually confident in my faith of painting. Your ideas are nice and do exist within a painting.


From: bbrace@netcom.com (brad brace)

Sounds promising...if only it didn't have a name; -)


From: mcfallindustry@hotmail.com (angela mcfall)

Most mysterious message like a moment from Steppenwolf in which a golden door appears where it never existed before. I would like to see the long version of the manifesto.


lordchance@xoommail.com (Tracy Poole)

I find expression a means to an end. A way of keeping in touch with reality. This reality is only an interpretation of what one believes. I therefore can only perceive what Jaisini eludes to in my own light. If this affliction is real then it is most grievous. The spirit and not the form is what is important. Form is transitory at best. Sensuality on the animal level is not a form of expression but a device by which the species survive. On a higher level it becomes gratification. On the highest level it enters a whole new realm. At any rate, I wish to look beyond the mortal precepts.

lordchance@xoommail.com (Tracy Poole)

Any interpretation is a product of c circumstances and environment. Jaisini's work can only be viewed in the light of our own strengths and failings. Said views are transitory as our frame of mind changes. Case in point, my own views of life and death have changed dramatically due to my illness. These aspects have become more pronounced. The finer points of Jaisini's works become blurred and unimportant. This is not to say I can not appreciate those views but I must concentrate harded for them to have form. You have given me the gift of your insight. Few people realize how important the exchange is. Be forewarned that my part may be weak as best due to my failings.

lordchance@xoommail.com (Tracy Poole)

jaisini's concepts are interesting. I wonder where his visual perceptions manifest. If we speak from the media then the world will truly end at the turn of the century. I believe that if you ponder the common man's vision then you will see that the end only comes upon death. A narrow outlook to be sure but one which is easily understood by most.
You give voice to an artist's images.


mcpoirier@storm.ca

So OK, Yustas, where can I see this marvel of postmodern de-sexed sex art?


thony@ecentral.com (Anthony Lauro)

I'm intrigued, but I'd really like to see the painting before I can communicate anything intelligent about it. In passing response to what the text comments, I'd like to say that it sometimes strikes me as easy to observe that society is seemingly imploding from its own critical mass. What does that really mean/ If Cicero thought that society was dumbing down, how do we continue as society? The problem lies in the word continue. There is only the now. There is no past. We retain the past as a reference point, but society is now. It's new in every moment and is what we imagine it to be. There is more communication, there is more freedom, there is no more sex, there is no less sex, there is no more desire, there is more abundance realizing than ever before in human history. American society while seemingly materialistic on a purely plastic level, is only a reflection of the desire of our population. The fact that one supermarket in America contains more stuff than most countries in Central Africa is a testament to the desire of people here. We are allowing our imagination to run, to create worlds. This country in particularly manifests the infinite abundance of the universe and the material place that we inhabit. But this has the sound of judgment to it. There is no judgment of present or past. what are we allowing; what are we flowing energy to? What are creating that has never been before? What are we focused in this moment? That is all we ever need to be concerned about as individuals. Think globally, act individually. Ghandi changed the world, but he did by changing himself. he focused on only that which he wanted, what do you want? Do you want love, peace, hate, war, sex, food, art, commerce - what? You get whatever you want, whatever you pay attention to. attention must be paid! But to what I ask, to what? Again, I'd love to see the painting.


From: thony@ecentral.com (Anthony Lauro)

while your description is vivid and I assume complete, it is still hard to visualize such a complex and sophisticated piece of art. I like the symbolic nature of the 911 referent and the nature of the triptych both of which denote the number three. There are powerful numbers and of course that is another layer to the biblical imagery of the piece - the father, the son, and the holy ghost. The trinity is actually that which gives life to all that is, while I very much respond to ecumenical symbolism, I find that my sense of the universe and our place in it is changing. I no longer believe that man is separate from the eternal energy that drives the universe. I don not believe that Icarus is being judged by anyone other than himself and therefore his only option is that which he chooses. What does he want as the creator of his own temporal experience? Does he want harmony in his now movement? Or does he not know and therefore create by default like so many humans that have incarnated on the material plane. From this perspective, death is no the end of anything. It is simply a transition back into pure positive energy, the drive force of the universe. Birth is not to be rated better or worse than death, they are both the transitions from and into the eternal stream of energy that makes up all that is.
Why do we need to have continuity with the past? The past does not exist except for our discussion of it. Only the now moment exists. And that which we call firmament is simply a creation of our collective minds. Reality is shaped by every individual at every moment. Icarus is the archetype for all humans, because we are all creators. Evil, hell, monsters, etc. these concepts exist only because we believe in them. They have no independent reality. They are simply concepts borne from people that are not allowing their connection with source to flow through them. For even in physical form we are always connected to source. To put in Jesusís words, god exist in all men, all the time. There is no separation of time, space, dimension, anything we are all one.
I still want to see these paintings. Also, why are you writing about Jaisiniís work? Is it possible to see his paintings in museums or in books? Inquiring minds want to know.


From: jerry@neoncrunch.on.ca (Jerry Waese)

Jaisini; I'm getting messages but they tend to pass over and under my head, I wish you would allow some order to your rant, or some disorder to your heavy theory.
Presupposing some familiarity with color and shape to be evidence of superiority in an artist, or even that there is a real meaning in an artist producing a consistent series of good works other than he got through it again, misses the point.What a tower of Babel you seem to be attracted to.otherwise I think you are right as rain.I react as follows:
composition with no end and no beginning-yes
to achieve -wrong -a process yes!
visual flexibility-absolutely
theoretical flexibility -an unnecessary cryptogram! you need freedom from theory
Art based on the depiction-involvement more than depiction!
of a circle evolution of understanding and seeing.
-keep rolling - circle out circle back - love the process be the evolution!
A kind of art which draws upon imagery and seeks to reveal an abstract idea of the connection within. -this connection is dynamic or fluid
-only abstract if you don't have it - or forgot to let go.
itís flexitime because it has-you are not required to explain why it is flexible
-but good of you to take notice
multiple principles-oceanic.
it is a session of Hypnosis which controls you by a disorganized harmony of everything we ever expected-yes stop there!
It depends on the pattern of line as a primal creator of whatever associated or disassociated from the theme. -you have spent too much time in school.
The artist's mind is your real canvas. Be art unearth art from your universe. Let the canvas be exposed to mind, and the reactions take place.
The whole ego thing is just for marketing, it really gets in the way of the actual work.
So whatís it all about anyway, you gonna put some pix up?

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Subject: Blue Reincarnation Narcissus painting by Jaisini


Author:
yustas
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Date Posted: 23:04:42 06/14/03 Sat

Blue Reincarnation Narcissus painting by Jaisini

The theme of Narcissus in Jaisini's "Blue..." may be paralleled with the problem of the

two-sexes-in-one, unable to reproduce and, therefore, destined to the Narcissus-like

end. Meanwhile, the Narcissus legend lasts. In the myth of Narcissus a youth gazes

into the pool. As the story goes, Narcissus came to the spring or the pool and when his

form was seen by him in the water, he drowned among the water nymphs because he

desired to make love to his own image. Maybe the new Narcissus, as in "Blue

Reincarnation," is destined to survive by simply changing his role from a passive man to

an aggressive woman and so on. To this can be added that, eventually, a man creates a

woman whom he loves out of himself or a woman creates a man and loves her own

image but in the male form. The theme of narcissism recreates the 'lost object of desire.

"Blue" also raises the problem of conflating ideal actual and the issue of the feminine

manhood and masculine femininity. There is another story about Narcissus' fall, which

said that he had a twin sister and they were exactly alike in appearance. Narcissus fell

in love with his sister and, when the girl died, would go to the spring finding some relief

for his love in imagining that he saw not his own reflection but the likeness of his sister.

"Blue" creates a remarkable and complex psychopathology of the lost, the desired, and

the imagined. Instead of the self, Narcissus loves and becomes a heterogeneous

sublimation of the self. Unlike the Roman paintings of Narcissus, which show him alone

with his reflection by the pool, the key dynamic in Jaisini's "Blue" is the circulation of

the legend that does not end and is reincarnated in transformation when autoeroticism

is not permanent and is not single by definition. In "Blue," we risk being lost in the

double reflection of a mirror and never being able to define on which side of the mirror

Narcissus is. The picture's color is not a true color of spring water. This kind of color is

a perception of a deep-seated human belief in the concept of eternity, the rich saturated

cobalt blue. The ultra hot, hyperreal red color of the figure of Narcissus is not supposed

to be balanced in the milieu of the radical blue. Jaisini realizes the harmony in the most

exotic color combination. While looking at "Blue," we can recall the spectacular color of

night sky deranged by a vision of some fierce fireball. The disturbance of colors creates

some powerful and awe-inspiring beauty. In the picture's background, we find the

animals' silhouettes, which could be a memory reflection or dream fragments. In the

story, Narcissus has been hunting - an activity that was itself a figure for sexual desire

in antiquity. Captivated by his own beauty, the hunter sheds a radiance that, one

presumes, reflects to haunt and foster his desire. The flaming color of the picture's

Narcissus alludes to the erotic implications of the story and its unresolved problem of

the one who desires himself and is trapped in the erotic delirium. The concept can be

applied to an ontological difference between the artist's imitations and their objects. In

effect, Jaisini's Narcissus could epitomize artistic aspiration to control levels of reality

and imagination, to align the competition of art and life, of image with imaginable

prototype. Jaisini's "Blue" is a unique work that adjoins reflection to reality without any

instrumentality. "Blue" is a single composition that depicts the reality and its immediate

reflection. Jaisini builds the dynamics of desire between Narcissus and his reflection-of-

the-opposite by giving him the signs of both sexes, but not for the purpose of creating a

hermaphrodite. The case of multiple deceptions in "Blue" seems to be vital to the cycle

of desire. Somehow it reminds one of the fates of the artists and their desperate

attempts to evoke and invent the nonexistent. "Blue" is a completely alien picture to

Jaisini's "Reincarnation" series. The pictures of this series are painted on a plain ground

of canvas that produces the effect of free space filled with air. "Blue," to the contrary, is

reminiscent of an underwater lack of air; the symbolism of this picture's texture and

color contributes to the mirage of reincarnation.

By Yustas Kotz-Gottlieb New York 2003, Text Copyright: Yustas Kotz-Gottlieb ALL

RIGHTS RESERVED Send private comments to author Gttlieb@aol.com

The Art of Paul Jaisini by Yustas Kotz-Gottlieb http://jaisini.artbabyart.net/

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Subject: jaisini imaginary or not


Author:
Angela Brant
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Date Posted: 13:57:21 06/07/03 Sat

so yastus,are u saying this is a self imaginary oil painting,i am very into poetic art and to me this sounds like [poetic art[see im not saying u don't know what ur talking about but i write poetry and i've went to deep hypnotisality with my poetry something i can share with the poetic art is my poetry,anyway enough of the large talk i want to view the oil paintin to figure out my version of it could u please tell me how i can see this
painting[please yor help would be grateful]ending on poetic term:
may you take the interpitation of your life and make it a reality or a dream only you and you alone can make that dwelling decision.
thank you very much Angela Brant

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Subject: CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS for Publication of "Jaisini Gleitzeit Supermodernity"


Author:
yustas
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Date Posted: 18:37:26 05/30/03 Fri

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS for Publication of "Jaisini Gleitzeit Supermodernity"
WRITER'S GUIDELINES
L.C.McCreshly Publications is seeking submissions for their upcoming book entitled: Jaisini Gleitzeit Supermodernity: New age American art.
What is accepted for submission to be included in the book:
Literary essays (1,000-3,000 words) for associative writing on invisible paintings.
The best art is art of fantasy; literary exploration of visual dimension is a new a vehicle but expresses so much more, contemporary directions of aesthetic development in art and art receptors, viewers who belong to the art tradition and never before had a chance to express their opinion on art. This is your opportunity to be a part of a new art and express your understanding of future of fine art.
You can also submit controversial views and any argument to the leading idea of non-visibility of new art.
HOW to submit:
In the body of an e-mail. No attachments.
Send submissions to gttlieb@aol.com, with “Submission” in the subject line. Please include your name, pen name if you use one, and author's bio if desired. Your work will be judged on merit of originality and degree of interest in the subject (you are advised to read essays, but the style of writing is not mandated to be professional art-speak and can be free versed.
RIGHTS AND COPYRIGHT
We ask for reproduction and archival rights. Author retains all other rights.
DEADLINE
Closing date for entries will depend on quantity and quality of submissions. We expect to include as many authors who submitted original opinions also depending on length of selected works.
CONTACT
Yustas Kotz-Gottlieb
gttlieb@aol.com
http://jaisini.artbabyart.net/

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Subject: new visual arts site


Author:
katherine
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Date Posted: 22:40:07 05/22/03 Thu

*
Knowledge Loom Launches New Spotlight—Choice-Based Art Education

I looked at a painting by Paul Gaughin. He made a painting with two girls sitting down cutting flowers. I made a picture that had two girls. It is of me and my mom. She was doing a braid in my hair to go out to eat. We had the same clothes on and we both had braids in our hair. I was making hair things.
A Third Grader’s Artist Statement

If you visit The Knowledge Loom (http://knowledgeloom.org/tab), an interactive best-practice website created by The Education Alliance at Brown University with initial funding from the U.S. Department of Education, you will see the tempera painting that this third-grade “Gaughin” created. It’s just one of several samples of student work that you’ll find on one of The Loom’s newest spotlights: “Choice-based Art—Teaching for Artistic Behavior.” The spotlight also allows you to listen in on a conversation about the pedagogy of choice-based art education and add your own thoughts to an online panel discussion. Though many educators advocate for a student-centered approach to learning, The Knowledge Loom is the first interactive Web resource with this model as a focus in the art room. Choice-based art classrooms simulate studios, offering effective organization of space, time, and materials that enable students to create work which is individual, compelling, and personally meaningful.

Just what is involved in choice-based art? Katherine Douglas, seasoned classroom teacher, practicing artist, and long-time proponent of this way of teaching explains, “Sometimes artists are exploring materials which ultimately give them their ideas, and so, these materials must be in the control of the artist. In a choice-based classroom we make certain that our students are in control of their materials, even our very young students . . .Some of the best art emerges from student exploration.” Douglas and her colleagues at the Teaching for Artistic Behavior Partnership developed the content for the Loom’s art-focused spotlight, based on their many years of classroom experience and their own work as artists. Douglas sat down recently with John Crowe, chair of the Art Education Department at Massachusetts College of Art, and Mary Anne Mather, one of the creators of the Loom, to discuss the differences between traditional and choice-based art education. As Crowe states, in many conventional classrooms “the art teacher essentially is the artist, and the students just carry out assignments. They are not really independent explorers.” A full transcript (along with audio) of their conversation can be found at http://www.knowledgeloom.org/tab/tab_transcript.html.

The spotlight offers best practices in art teaching illustrated with actual classroom examples.

For more information, call Mary Anne Mather at (800) 521-9550, extension 226.

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Subject: Administrators and the Arts


Author:
Ken Rohrer
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Date Posted: 12:04:39 05/21/03 Wed

I'd like to see feedback on how administrators can support art teachers. I would also like to hear from fine arts magnet elementary schools and hear the steps they took to implement such a program.
Ken Rohrer

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Subject: Art Room Organization


Author:
Mrs. D.
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Date Posted: 18:15:56 05/07/03 Wed

I am an art teacher in a middle school, grades 5-8. Does any other art teacher have suggestions for a good way to organize supplies, or ideas for storage systems for supplies? This is a constant battle to keep things nice, clean, and working well.

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Subject: looking for a graduate program in Art


Author:
Heather
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Date Posted: 14:55:55 04/14/03 Mon

I know this is a long shot, but I've exhausted most of my options...
I was accepted to a Graduate program in Michigan (I live in the southwestern part of the state) to earn an 18hr cert. in Technology for Art Educators, and then I would earn the add'l 12 credits in Curriculum and Technology for a Masters in Science. It was very flexible with online classes, weekends, and summers. I would've had 5 years to complete if needed. For a single mom who needs the credit for my professional certificate- this was perfect! Due to massive budget cuts in higher ed, the Dean of the school (FSU) pulled the plug on the cert. program. Now, I'm back at square one looking for a program that will work with my busy schedule- accredited programs for Art Educators...online, weeknds, anything! I am unable to leave my teenage children (13 and 16) home alone all day during the summer because they have jobs and need transportation and supervision! My mentor got her masters in Elem Ed just because there were no other available programs for Art Educators. I have a hard time rationalizing spending all the money and time on a program that my heart isn't really in! Any suggestions or help would be greatly appreciated!!
Thanks!
Heather

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Subject: NEW! Baruch College CAPS Performing Arts Certificate Program in NYC


Author:
Jason S. Grossman
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Date Posted: 15:34:17 03/27/03 Thu

Hello,

We are announcing a new Performing Arts Certificate Program we're unveiling this Spring at Baruch College Continuing & Professional Studies. If you are interested please see below for course offerings for the Spring.

The Performing Arts Program has two major purposes: ONE, to encourage the non-actor into enriching his/her already established career choice, paving the way for those who have always wanted to be in the performing arts as a writer/producer/performer, and TWO, to provide technique workshops, networking and advancement resources for performing artists already established in the field; essentially a great way for actors/writers/producers to stay in shape and stay focused in their field.

A performer/producer who has completed the Baruch Performing Arts Program will be well-rounded in movement, acting, voice and specific disciplines depending on their chosen emphasis, such as directing, playwriting, producing one's own work, creative arts therapy, teaching and performing. A non-performer/producer who has completed the Program will be better qualified to obtain a job in the performing arts/entertainment field, such as advertising, design, real estate, photography and hundreds of other fields.

The Artists/Teachers making up the Baruch CAPS Performing Arts faculty are the most experienced, talented and dedicated pool of teachers in the New York area. *Note that students may enroll in the certificate program or attend classes on a course by course basis.

Please Contact:
Phone: 212-802-5600
E-mail: caps@baruch.cuny.edu
Baruch Website: http://cstudies.baruch.cuny.edu/
Funny... Sheesh Website: http://funnysheesh.tripod.com/home/id23.html, http://www.funnysheesh.com
Mail: Baruch College Continuing and Professional Studies, 17 Lexington Ave., Box A-0920, New York, NY 10010
Join new BaruchPerformingArtsClasses group list: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/BaruchPerformingArtsClasses

Courses for Spring Semester:
Intro to Playwriting (taught by Sharon Fogarty). Through spontaneous games and exercises, this course enables the student to brainstorm about plots, characters, relationships and touch on musical ideas. Putting the pieces together, students will get a good grasp on the art of the scene, story dynamics, scene texture, plot and character development. Students are encouraged to write dialogue in their own unique styles and voices. Assignments include the small cast one-act, the drama, the comedy and the musical. Also covered are venues for inexpensive production of plays in NYC, including a short trip to a local theatre. Students' plays and scenes will be acted by class members and by students from Karen Christie Ward's Acting Level I Course and culminate in an informal presentation of students' one-acts.
Saturdays, 10:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m., April 26 - June 21 (no class Saturday, May 24).

Creative Arts Therapy (taught by Sharon Fogarty) This class invites students of all levels to discover the art of 'play' and expand their ability for spontaneity through doodling, collage, dance, theatre and song. Designed to help students discover hidden talents and express themselves creatively, each session focuses on a different art form and allows the student to explore introductory methods in that area. Games to enhance the natural reflex to express one's self creatively without judgment are followed by creative assignments, then culminate into a "Personal Gallery Collection" by the student. Final projects include short plays, songs, posters and dance-theatre pieces created by the class. Wear comfortable clothing, $20 materials fee.
Wednesdays, 6:30- 9 :00 p.m., April 23 - June 18.

Audition Workshop for Stage, Television and Film (taught by Elizabeth Mozer). This class will arm each actor with the tools to best equip them for success at auditions. It will deal with the demands of both the stage and camera. Students will address audition fears, expectations, preparation, cold readings, monologues and interviews. Students will developed a deepened confidence and preparedness. (Previous acting experience suggested.)
Section 1: Sundays, 5:00 - 7:30 p.m., April 27 - June 22 (no class Sunday, May 25)
Section 2: Tuesdays, 7:00 - 9:30 p.m., April 29 - June 17

Movement for Actors (taught by Elizabeth Mozer). In this class, we will engage the performer in the physical craft of acting by creating physical awareness, freeing the body of habitual movement patterns and accessing the emotion that resides in the body. Students will gain the tools for creating, expressing and experiencing their emotional lives physically. (No experience necessary.)
Section 1: Sundays, 2:30 - 5:00 p.m., April 27 - June 22 (no class Sunday, May 25)
Section 2: Mondays, 7:00 - 9:30 p.m., April 28 - June 23 (no class Monday, May 26)

Intro to Improvisation (taught by Jason Grossman) Have you ever wanted to learn the craft of improvisation, currently one of the most popular performance art forms around? Would you like to know the secrets and tricks of the Improv trade? The objectives of this course are to discover the fundamentals of improvisational comedy, improve your storytelling skills, learn techniques to think quickly on your feet and to be more creative. This spirited, fun course is designed for the actor or comedian who wants to learn the essentials of good scenic improvisation or anyone who wants to improve their teamwork or communication skills. Through coaching, warm-up exercises, creative performance games and basic short-form scene-work, you will learn how to be more spontaneous, trusting and cooperative and how to listen in a fun, creative atmosphere. This class is open to new and continuing students of all ages and experience.
Thursdays, 6:00 - 9:00 p.m., April 24 - June 12

Screenwriting I (taught by Jason Hefter) This course is appropriate for screenwriters of varying experience - from first timers to those with several completed screenplays to their credit. The only pre-requisites are a love of movies, an interest in the creative process of writing for the screen and an active imagination. Writers looking for technical advice, work with story structure, characterization, 30/60/90 rules, arc and/or a better understanding of what the studios are looking for in a "saleable" screenplay will find this course invaluable. Students will have the ability to tailor the course to their specific screenplay needs. Questions about the industry, unorthodox ways to get feet in the door, the differences between independent and studio screenwriting, selling on spec and/or via the pitch, what is to be expected in your first "studio meeting", the advantages of representation, union and non-union work, obeying genre rules, will all be covered in detail. We will breakdown some recent successful movies for screenplay tips, discuss the 'classics' and offer students the opportunity to workshop their own material with the help and insight of other writers. Whether you are looking to make screenwriting a career or just enjoy the cathartic process of writing for a visual medium, this course will make you technically sound, help you to focus your ideas with an eye toward marketability and give answers to the questions you might not even know you should be asking.
Tuesdays, 6:00 - 9:00 p.m., April 29 - June 17

Acting I - for Beginners (taught by Karen Christie Ward) Acting for beginners is designed to introduce students to the craft of acting in a fun, noncompetitive environment. Through practical study and hands on experience, students will learn to use basic acting techniques, while increasing the self-confidence needed to perform before an audience. Each class will consist of physical and vocal warm ups, acting exercises and games, scene work, discussions and closing exercises. Each week students will prepare a scene using techniques learned in class. The class will discuss and critique each scene. Critiques on in class scene work, are based on short assigned readings, so each student's work is discussed in a common, non-judgmental language, Students will build from single person scenes and monologues to partnered scenes. (Some outside rehearsal time may be required). The class will culminate in a final presentation for an invited audience.
Thursdays, 6:00 to 9:00, April 24 - June 12

History of the Theatre/Intro to Drama (taught by Steve Smith) Among the oldest and most basic form of human communication is theater. In this course, we will examine the history of theater from its earliest classical roots in ancient Greece to modern times, as well as explore the impact theater has had on society. The class will read select examples of plays from Greek through modern theater and will discuss the evolution of the art on the stage, the influence theater has had on society, as well as the influence society has had on the stage.
The essential element of the theater, which differentiates it from any other performance medium, is the spoken word. Thus, the class will also participate in reading segments of the plays aloud in class so that this experience of the spoken word, the essence of the theatrical event, both as performer and as auditor, is not lost with these plays. The nature of theater is to communicate a story, or sometimes even simply an idea, to an audience gathered expressly to hear it. The relationship of an audience with a performance piece and the influence each has on the other is an integral part of the theatrical experience. In accordance with this, the class will also attempt as often as possible to view the plays included in the syllabus, either in recorded format or (if practical) live, to preserve as much as possible the impact the piece is intended to carry to an audience.
Mondays from 6:30-9:30, April 28 - June 23 (no class Monday, May 26)

Future Classes Include:
Journalism
From Page to Stage: How to Produce a Play
Scene Study
Directing
Scenic Design
Musical Theatre Appreciation
Acting II - Intermediate
Character Work
Poetry Workshop
Musical Theatre Improvisation I & II
Character Work
Intro to Theatre Dance
Theatre Management
A Foot in the Door

*For more information, future updates and to join the new BaruchPerformingArtsClasses group list, click here: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/BaruchPerformingArtsClasses

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Subject: art history slides


Author:
C. Keith Steinhart
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Date Posted: 16:41:03 03/24/03 Mon

does anyone know where I can purchase slides of Charles Rennie Mackintosh's work for an art history class?

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Subject: Airbrush Artist Magazine .Com


Author:
Don Johnson
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Date Posted: 06:45:24 02/11/03 Tue

www.airbrushartistmagazine.com will provide free access to the magazine web site to any art teacher who wishes to use it as a teaching tool in their program . Please e-mail for more details and check the magazine out at the above URL . Thank You
Don Johnson

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Subject: Short version of Jaisini "N-City" Photo review.


Author:
yustas
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Date Posted: 01:28:24 02/06/03 Thu

Short version of Jaisini "N-City" Photo review.
Jaisini is an artist with an inborn talent - by family tradition, a professional painter and graphic artist. He created his first photographic series called "N-City" and combined digital photography with the C-processing 35 mm camera.
The events of 9/11 in N-City were so sudden, he understood that to begin a series of paintings or any other art technique (or: media) dedicated to those events would have been a prolonged process.
To show the immediate impact of the artist's vision with an instant reflection of emotion and visual aspects, Jaisini originated his series, captivated with the intensity of photographing in N-City by the local correspondents and those from around the world. He was swept by a flow following the strong current that brought him to the beginning of his first photo series.
As a result of his endeavor, Jaisini produced artworks that were derived (or: extracted) from an idea he realized through technical and visual means. This process is more creative and complex, as we know. Jaisini's street wandering gave rise to his journalistic photography. He would take thousands of shots only to find one lucky shot from a hundred rolls. This work is automatic and, in a way, resembles gambling.
Working from an idea:
An idea is conceived from a heard phrase, a seen fragment, a read book. Inexplicably, the associative idea is created. Then, a search takes place for reflection of the idea through a prism of reality to show the unreal with the realistic means of photography. The material is searched with the experience and taste of an accomplished artist as Jaisini who has enormous know-how in painting. This means that he has no compositional limits, as opposed to a majority of photographers who suffer from having no practical knowledge of painting, composition, tone and color scale. Jaisini always searches for a concrete issue of today's question of existence in a contemporary environment. The decision of those questions connects to the artist's romanticism and hypnotic approach.
As an art critic like myself who studies the art works of Jaisini in the course of writing a book on the endeavor of this great New York artist, I can find no mistakes in his compositions. All are uniquely balanced with high taste. The technological side in the photographic series doesn't interest me much. If the professional commercial photographer can find "commercial" imperfections, then for the artistic estimation it works to the opposite of accomplishment.
The original size of the photos are larger then shown on the site. The edition of each work is limited to 8-9 prints. Each was printed with Iris Print on archival paper that is guaranteed to last 300 years under a glass cover or 200 years without glass protection. Each and every artwork was custom adjusted with the artist's proof and individually printed with pigmented ink. Thanks to brilliant new technology, the image will last at least 300 years.
The entire collection of "N-City" consists of over 100 individual works produced in the period of 2001-2003. In accord with the response, more images will be offered for the viewer's review.
The next series of photographic works is called "Black and White". 78 artworks are currently in process and are ready to be printed. I reviewed the slides and presentation of pre-print and as usual expected the unexpected from Jaisini. This time he didn't fail to surprise me either. Some works are emotionally charged, shocking and deeply memorable like tattoos in the mind.
It is never enough to see Jaisini's work just once. You find you want more and more.

Time Squared.
Two days before the arrival of the British rock group "Deep Purple", Jaisini received a commission from a fan of the group to create a commemorative picture for the occasion of their concert. It was to be presented as a private gift to the members of the group.
Jaisini found an interesting idea in one of the photo works from his "N-City " series and renamed it as "Child in Time Squared". Four prints were framed and signed by the artist, which were later presented to four members of the rock group by a client who was a long time fan of Deep Purple and Jaisini alike.

Short version of Jaisini "N-City" Photo review
Yustas Kotz-Gottlieb edited by Stella Richardson Copyright 2003 New York City

The Art of Paul Jaisini by Yustas Kotz-Gottlieb

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Subject: Custom canvases / watercolor canvases


Author:
Tannan
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Date Posted: 13:57:45 01/09/03 Thu

Hi, my name is Tannan Whidden and I'm the owner San Diego Custom Art Supply.
We make custom canvases for artists in all shapes and sizes allowing artists
to completely customize their canvas. We also make a Water Color Canvas,
Drawing Paper Canvas and Pastel/Charcoal Paper Canvas. We are located at
www.sdcas.com, check us out.

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Subject: Praxis ll art making essay


Author:
mlee
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Date Posted: 13:31:30 01/09/03 Thu

Help............have taken this several times ; missed it
by 5 pts. this last time. My degree is in art ed. & Masters in Ed. with concentration in art. I need advice on how to pass this test........any suggestions, insights would be greatly appreciated.

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Subject: Re: Interviewing for an art teaching position


Author:
Ken Rohrer
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Date Posted: 15:45:38 11/01/02 Fri

In this day and age it's important to tie in art with state standards. It would help your case temendously if you could teach a state standard using an art lesson. For example, if a third grade student needs to understand an octagon as a math standard, then the art work would include octagons.
Ken
----------------------------------------------------------
Hi--

I am interviewing for an art teaching position for grades K-8, and was wondering if anyone had any advice or tips they could give me. I have looked over the standards and objectives, but many of them seem alike to me, so I am a little confused on them. I need to do an activity that demonstrates or teaches an art objective to the interviewing board. I was thinking of doing one on primary and secondary colors. Does this sound ok, or do you think I should do something more creative? Help! Any advice would be greatly appreciated!

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Subject: Interviewing for an art teaching position


Author:
Ally
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Date Posted: 21:55:48 10/18/02 Fri

Hi--

I am interviewing for an art teaching position for grades K-8, and was wondering if anyone had any advice or tips they could give me. I have looked over the standards and objectives, but many of them seem alike to me, so I am a little confused on them. I need to do an activity that demonstrates or teaches an art objective to the interviewing board. I was thinking of doing one on primary and secondary colors. Does this sound ok, or do you think I should do something more creative? Help! Any advice would be greatly appreciated!

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Subject: string art


Author:
j. ryan
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Date Posted: 11:04:44 10/15/02 Tue

Hello,
I am looking for a low dcost background to use with string art. I have heard of using 1/2 ply wood, but I was looking for something less expensive. I welcome any suggestions.


Jeanne

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Subject: Inventor of Plasticine


Author:
Terry Harbutt
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Date Posted: 15:05:20 09/26/02 Thu

Dear Sue
It was my Great Grandfather who invented Plasticine. He was headmaster at the Paragon School in Bath teaching art and thought that a permanently plastic medium would be better for his pupils to use than clay which was dirty and dried out too fast. After some experimentation he developed Plasticine (not quite the same as in latter years) and it became so popular that he bought an old mill in Bathampton to manufacture it. It continued to grow in popularity and remained a family company 'till about 1975.
His wife was a noted artist also and was a respected minituraist and painted on porcelain as well as other mediums. She was commissioned by Queen Victoria to do minatures of herself and Albert.
If you wish any further information feel free to email me at tharbutt@aol.com
Regards
Terry Harbutt

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Subject: Click banner to visit web site!


Author:
Mark Mulfinger
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Date Posted: 12:13:18 09/24/02 Tue



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Subject: ALL ART TEACHERS PLZ READ!


Author:
Kamylla3000
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Date Posted: 10:57:31 09/21/02 Sat

Ok, THANK YOU for reading this. I really need some help! You see, in one of my classes we are doing a project where we have to pick a job and then we have to write about that job. I picked art teacher. Now, I really need someone to interview!!! It's just a few simple questions, nothing personal. Just questions about the job.

IF I CAN ASK YOU A FEW QUESTIONS, PLEASE...
E-MAIL ME - moviestar603@msn.com
OR
SEND ME AN INSTANT MESSAGE - Kamylla3000

THANK YOU SOOOO MUCH!!!!

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Subject: art site


Author:
ido zahavi
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Date Posted: 12:39:27 09/06/02 Fri

a site of a dutch painter

http://members.lycos.nl/z100a/

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Subject: looking for resources on ART for EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN.


Author:
Carla Listener
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Date Posted: 18:06:04 09/01/02 Sun

I am a senior in an Elementary education program. I am doing some research on websites and books pertaining
to exceptional children within the realm fine arts.
I hope that by posting the here I will find some direction
and clues were as to find such information.
Thanks for taking the time to help.

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Subject: 911, Oil painting by Jaisini


Author:
yustas
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Date Posted: 01:29:18 09/01/02 Sun

911, Oil painting by Jaisini
This triptych is an early work where Jaisini had chosen the emergency number as a decorative possibility for associative image-making. The artist may like the subject for its close connection to matters of life, death, and super power. He has utilized the idea not only for its symbolic meaning, but also for a visual purpose. In the triptych, side by side, coexists a depiction of eternity, ("1" with water), and a briefness of human life ("1" with Icarus). The spatial fragmentation is a visual mode that creates a close up view. The large 9, 1, 1 numbers are inserted and incorporated in the paintings' surface which creates an optical illusion, as during a film development, when images emerge from the background. The left part of the triptych is No 9. This painting unites the number with a mob of demons who were brought together by a woodoo dance. The picture is willfully enigmatic but, at the same time, has a great power of not the phenomena it depicts, but rather the medium itself, an integration of the number with images visually. An anomalous space relationship in the three parts creates magic experience of flame, water, and fall. The three parts of the "911" triptych are to be read as a unity from left to right. The layering juxtaposition of images spins the work in a dynamic movement. "9" part exhibits a dance of spells when dark powers unfold the disaster. This left part of triptych with "9" reminds an arched gateway to Hell with the head devil situated diagonally from the top left corner towards the right foreground. This image is actually a large wooden mask with a huge white fang. A blue razor blade pierces its nose. The demon's eyes are rolled in from his exaltation of the weightless, ritual dance. The artist disguises his personages of dark forces as monsters. For ages the Last Judgments on the walls of churches had made much of frightful and grandiose monsters. Jaisini applies the humorous overtone to a theme of supernatural. In the center of "9," there is a nude female demon with red, absent eyes and bulging tongue, which speak more of her own ecstasy than of terror. The color of "9" is not of an infernal pit, but instead is a heated color of the African sun that liquefies air. "1" with water shows "Flying Holland," a phantom-ship, a legendary sign of disaster for sailors. The ocean depths hold the remains of the shipwreck. Skulls and treasures suggest of the life's and earthly possessions' transience, "the momento mori" of a physical life. You may question the connection of the three pictures and find some interesting possibilities. What we have in "911" is not a universal course of events. It is an ordeal of one man, who stays behind his creation and is a survived prototype for his own judgment. Neither the beginning, nor the end of his tormented existence is constructed here, but the lesson of a legend is. To fulfill his concept, Jaisini uses the personages of Icarus who is a traditional image of an inventor. The portrayal of Icarus by Jaisini is a spiritual trial, the expression of delimitation that can happen of just-awakened and terrified consciousness of man. Creation brings the artists close to the destructive powers from beyond. Artists and inventors are familiar with this feeling of fall into abyss that can also be a moment of rise. Icarus is shown in the triptych separately from the treasure of the middle part (1 with water) as he is not a mediocre man who used to be the center of philosophical investigation as, for example in Bosch's "Death and the miser." In Jaisini's "911" the Four Last Things, Death, Judgment, Hell, Heaven, turn out in an unusual way. Icarus looks at the destination of his fall with a weak, last hope, just as the Bosch's dying miser-man, for a miracle. In Jaisini's version, no one passes the test of Last Judgment, except for Icarus. He represents the creative kind, whose legend never dies. He is the one mortal left to face his destiny, yet undecided, is it to be the rise, or the fall? The "911" triptych creates a concept of a life cycle that does not stop, that blasts energy even through death. The work is a new poetic representation of the human dream to reach powers which do not belong to the human nature. When the limits are being pushed to a critical point resulting in disaster, God is the one who is being called upon. In Jaisini's work, God is not rendered visually, but could be the painting's concept, a code of numbers for help, 9 1 1. The triptych has its aesthetic durability of a new confessional style. Review of "911" by Paul Jaisini
Copyright ©2000Yustas Kotz-Gottlieb. All rights reserved. New York

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Subject: 17th century icongraphical geometry


Author:
Jim Warren
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Date Posted: 03:50:36 08/26/02 Mon

Does anyone know where I can find information about the mathematical basis of the iconography of seventeenth-century French painting?

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Subject: PAINTING- STILL LIFE OF OLD WATER PUMPAND FLOWERS BY BUILDING


Author:
ANDREW WEISS
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Date Posted: 20:23:51 08/14/02 Wed

I HAVE OIL ON CANVAS SIGNED PAINTING OF OLD HAND WATER PUMP ABOVE A BARREL OF FLOWERS, BESIDE A BUILDING AND BROKEN WIRE FENCE. ON THE BACK IS WRITTEN, "THE OLD WATER PUMP". THE SIGNATURE IS "PARSONS", (PRINTED). WHEN I SEARCHED, HELEN PARSONS SHEPHERD CAME UP, BUT NO INFO ON THIS PAINTING. HELP PLEASE!!!!!
ANDY

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Subject: special needs students/ how does art ed. help them to learn


Author:
branigan
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Date Posted: 18:08:02 06/24/02 Mon

I am an art education student and am taking a class called Exceptionalities in the Classroom. For this class we had to come up with an essential question that we would research throughout the class. My question is : How can art education be used as a platform for learning with students who have a learning disability?
I am having a hard time finding information and was wondering if anyone had any resources/web sites or just some input on the question. Anything will help. Thank you

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[> Subject: Re: special needs students/ how does art ed. help them to learn


Author:
joan stagg
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Date Posted: 21:32:22 08/08/02 Thu

I teach 3 blocks of 7th grade regular mathematics and 3 blocks of advanced math, Pre-Algebra. I have used string are with geometry. But what I truly need is math using are to catch the attention of my slow learns.
~Joan Stagg
McKinley Middle Magnet School
1557 McCalop street 70802

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Subject: Good resource for students and artists


Author:
bridgette
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Date Posted: 21:10:42 07/27/02 Sat

I just had to share this resource with you.

For over 15 years I have been presenting a marketing workshop for people working in the arts. I have presented it to art organizations, universities etc. I am now offering it FREE. I have been asked to be a contributing writer to artist promote and have decided to put all of my presentation in writing. The format is a monthly article with homework for participants. The presentation is a full weekend so it will take us a while to get through everything. I am excited to offer this opportunity and hope it helps each of you. The response has always been more than favorable.

It is located at http://www.promoteartist.com/bridgette/

Thanks,
Sculptor Bridgette Mongeon
http://www.creativesculpture.com

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Subject: Paul Jaisini-May-2002


Author:
brigitte arlette rahman
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Date Posted: 17:29:49 07/02/02 Tue

Paul Jaisini-May-2002
The Artist: Dinner invitation with Anataalie

oOo



I had heard of of Rahman Brigitte AKA Anataalie, a French woman living in Arabia, through the New York artist, Mr. Yustas K. Gottlieb, a talented writer who had published insightful reviews on my paintings.

He told me of how much she had enjoyed one my works called: Drunken Santa.


Yustas had confided in me and said of Anataalie:


"I highly regard her sensitivity in communicative arts. I am sure that she has to continue to work in the literary area and mature to some serious body of work. I had a chance to read her poems before and they contain human feelings without pretense and with temperament that I sympathize with personally. Adding to this, her star-like appearance creates
real magical impact on her readers. I hope Jaisini that you will meet her too."

It so happened that last May 2001, I was to be in London and that Anataalie was in town. I was pretty depressed with life and art, and decided to give her a call and find out what it was that she found so remarkable in my art.


We agreed to meet for dinner the same day in San Lorenzo, her favorite Italian restaurant in West London, so she said on the phone.


I had arrived a little ahead at 9pm and sat at the table for two, I had reserved.

The prices on the menu looked pretty stiff, and I was not even sure I would be able to pay that kind of a bill.

As I was lost in the materialist thoughts of the exploited artist I had become, a woman entered. Heads turned, there was something very unusual in the way she walked or stood. I was shocked by the opulence of her outfit, she was wearing a long dark blue velvet off shoulder gown on which she had casually thrown a lilac pashmini scarf, and she wore dark blue gloves…


She actually dazzled: she had long shining auburn hair, vivid brown-emerald eyes, and she was adorned with diamonds that threw sparkle against sparkle from her ears to her neck, from her neck to her wrist and fingers, from her hands to her ankle. Yes that too :she was wearing an unusual diamond bracelet on her left ankle.


She was quite a sight, yet there was a deep softness about her: her walk was silent and her voice was gentle and low. It was she of course: Anataalie or Rahman, Brigitte arlette.


As she approached our table with a smile, I have to admit that I felt weak in the knees. But soon as she sat, my anxiety vanished, when she declared with a gentle laugh:


"Forgive me, artist, I need to drink an expresso and look at the bottom of the cup. Give me five minutes, will ya?"


She was like a little girl. I watched her, amazed and already seduced.


When she had played her little girl's trick, and had managed to put me at ease, we started to talk of life and art, of art and life. I soon discovered that she had in fact read very little, and was leading, back in Arabia. a very reclusive life whereas she did not even watch the television, or read newspapers. She just abhorred intellectualism, she was the movement and the moment, and she despised yesterday as much as she did tomorrow.


Nevertheless, I felt myself wanting desperately to please her, to show off to her and I talked of writers long dead, of painters whose graves I had visited. She sneered and threw me a ferocious look. I felt defeated. I asked her:


"Anataalie, it seems you do not like me."


She replied:


"Jaisini, why on earth should I like you or dislike you? You are the illusion and the magician, and I am the medium."


I was startled by her reply.

She planted her gaze in my eyes, motionless, and she practically hypnotized me. Her mind forced mine to return to the artist's workshop I had left behind. I saw , in that motionless thought, myself in New York in front of a canvass painting a woman, a beautiful woman: Anataalie.


I woke up from the waking dream and I said:


"Anataalie, you made me paint a mental tarot card of you. You are a model, aren't you? You once were in love with an artist who painted you, weren't you?


She did not reply but she was pleased.

We stayed in that little restaurant for another two hours eating at random: sometimes something salty, sometimes something sweet , and we mixed the cappuccinos with the Chianti. I was a happy man, all eyes were on our table, and she did not seem to care.

She had been acting all evening and she knew I understood.

She was an expert in reviving dying hopes.


Because that woman did give me a new reason to live, to paint:
……..The Tarot Card of Anataalie….


As it was time to leave, I asked for the bill. She understood the thoughts I had before her arrival in San Lorenzo Restaurant. She said with her typical gentle laughter:


"But there is no bill, Jaisini, they charge my account. You see this is my favorite place, I come here with the people who will have a meaning in my life. Do you actually carry money with you? We are in the electronic age, you know. Money is dirty, leave it in the bank and let them put tabs on you. I do so always, I help create new job openings too."


This time, I laughed long and hard. She was an expert in putting people at ease.


As we left, I asked Anataalie:


"May I see you again, soon?"


Anataalie closed her eyes for a while and said:


"No, Jaisini, we shall never meet again"


I felt a deep pain, and yet a deep hope because I knew that I was going to paint the Tarot Card of Anataalie, and that magical card would bring her back to me.

I stood there as she boarded a taxi and got lost in the London Night. I shivered from a sudden sense of loss, of loneliness.


The next day, I flew back to New York, my friend Yustas was at the airport and asked me, with a little twinkle in his eyes:


"So, did you meet her? How did you find her? She is such a mysterious woman"


I was already jealous of Yustas and casually replied:


"Brigitte is my kind of woman, living fast and being adventurous, keeping herself attractive to a man. But of course I am a romantic."

Rahman, Brigitte arlette had set a new magical course in my life, "une oeuvre d'art a naitre" :


The tarot Card d'Anataalie par Paul Jaisini


My last masterpiece, the one that will bring her back to me.


Paul Jaisini.
Surrealist Painter
C/o
Yustas K Gottlieb

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Subject: plasticine recepie


Author:
julia
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 02:06:55 06/27/02 Thu

what is the recepie for plasticine?

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Subject: Slides


Author:
Dena
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Date Posted: 17:42:27 02/28/02 Thu

Does anyone know where I can purchase slides/overheads for an art history class of mine?

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[> Subject: Re: Slides Art History


Author:
Thelma
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Date Posted: 09:34:25 06/01/02 Sat

>Does anyone know where I can purchase slides
>for an art history class of mine. I am looking to buy them from a UK supplier, so far I have only found US suppliers.?

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Subject: Fiber/Textile Art suggestion?


Author:
Veronica
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 14:22:33 05/23/02 Thu

Hi! I'm trying to come up with a fiber or textile art project that my high school students will like. They don't like quilting, soft sculpture is frustrating, they find weaving boring, and basketmaking dull. Since I've kept the projects fairly basic, maybe someone has a jazzy spin on the usual they use with their classes that I could try. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

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Subject: bells in art


Author:
Ardelle
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 15:30:47 08/29/01 Wed

prtc.gnl.netI AM SEARCHING FOR INFORMATION ON BELLS AND
THEIR USE AND INFLUENCE IN THE DIFFERENT ARTISTIC EXPRESSIONS, PARTICULARLY IN SCULPTURE AND EARTH ART.

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[> Subject: Re: bells in art


Author:
veronica
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Date Posted: 14:12:18 05/23/02 Thu

>prtc.gnl.netI AM SEARCHING FOR INFORMATION ON BELLS
>AND
>THEIR USE AND INFLUENCE IN THE DIFFERENT ARTISTIC
>EXPRESSIONS, PARTICULARLY IN SCULPTURE AND EARTH ART.


cosanti.com or cosanti.org is the site of an Arizona artist's community that has used 'art bells' to fund their construction. They're beautiful bells, in ceramic and bronze, and I believe they have a page where they explain their meaning, etc.

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Subject: how do people in schools use art education to teach and how is it working out? give examples please.


Author:
Anya
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Date Posted: 15:10:44 04/28/02 Sun

I'm doing a report on why i think art education should be part of school's grades K-12 regular curriculum and i need to see who is currently usibg art education to teach and how it is working out. If anyone could help me please do! Thanks a million!

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Subject: History of Plasticine


Author:
Brigitte Wiebe
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Date Posted: 14:52:05 06/29/01 Fri

Does anyone have a good internet source for info re: the history of plasticine?

Please send me the web-site address, if you would!

Thanks,

Brigitte
bwiebe@ms.umanitoba.ca

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Subject: Special Needs Art students: HELP!


Author:
Heather
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 11:17:08 04/12/02 Fri

Hi All! I am an Elementary Art Teacher (first year) and teach K-3. I have a small group of special needs students that I see once a week. They are various ages and I've found that using the 1st grade lessons seem to work for them (it would be impossible to teach seperate lessons for each student). I would appreciate any lessons you might want to share. I prefer DBAE lessons- we don't do craft projects unless they fit w/in our K-12 curriculum guidelines (multicultural...).
Thanks so much!
Heather
South Haven, MI

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Subject: 911 Jaisini


Author:
yustas
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 21:29:39 11/13/01 Tue

911
Oil painting by Jaisini
This triptych is an early work where Jaisini had chosen the emergency number as a decorative possibility for associative image-making. The artist may like the subject for its close connection to matters of life, death, and super power. He has utilized the idea not only for its symbolic meaning, but also for a visual purpose. In the triptych, side by side, coexists a depiction of eternity, ("1" with water), and a briefness of human life ("1" with Icarus). The spatial fragmentation is a visual mode that creates a close up view. The large 9, 1, 1 numbers are inserted and incorporated in the paintings' surface which creates an optical illusion, as during a film development, when images emerge from the background. The left part of the triptych is No 9. This painting unites the number with a mob of demons who were brought together by a woodoo dance. The picture is willfully enigmatic but, at the same time, has a great power of not the phenomena it depicts, but rather the medium itself, an integration of the number with images visually. An anomalous space relationship in the three parts creates magic experience of flame, water, and fall. The three parts of the "911" triptych are to be read as a unity from left to right. The layering juxtaposition of images spins the work in a dynamic movement. "9" part exhibits a dance of spells when dark powers unfold the disaster. This left part of triptych with "9" reminds an arched gateway to Hell with the head devil situated diagonally from the top left corner towards the right foreground. This image is actually a large wooden mask with a huge white fang. A blue razor blade pierces its nose. The demon's eyes are rolled in from his exaltation of the weightless, ritual dance. The artist disguises his personages of dark forces as monsters. For ages the Last Judgments on the walls of churches had made much of frightful and grandiose monsters. Jaisini applies the humorous overtone to a theme of supernatural. In the center of "9," there is a nude female demon with red, absent eyes and bulging tongue, which speak more of her own ecstasy than of terror. The color of "9" is not of an infernal pit, but instead is a heated color of the African sun that liquefies air. "1" with water shows "Flying Holland," a phantom-ship, a legendary sign of disaster for sailors. The ocean depths hold the remains of the shipwreck. Skulls and treasures suggest of the life's and earthly possessions' transience, "the momento mori" of a physical life. You may question the connection of the three pictures and find some interesting possibilities. What we have in "911" is not a universal course of events. It is an ordeal of one man, who stays behind his creation and is a survived prototype for his own judgment. Neither the beginning, nor the end of his tormented existence is constructed here, but the lesson of a legend is. To fulfill his concept, Jaisini uses the personages of Icarus who is a traditional image of an inventor. The portrayal of Icarus by Jaisini is a spiritual trial, the expression of delimitation that can happen of just-awakened and terrified consciousness of man. Creation brings the artists close to the destructive powers from beyond. Artists and inventors are familiar with this feeling of fall into abyss that can also be a moment of rise. Icarus is shown in the triptych separately from the treasure of the middle part (1 with water) as he is not a mediocre man who used to be the center of philosophical investigation as, for example in Bosch's "Death and the miser." In Jaisini's "911" the Four Last Things, Death, Judgment, Hell, Heaven, turn out in an unusual way. Icarus looks at the destination of his fall with a weak, last hope, just as the Bosch's dying miser-man, for a miracle. In Jaisini's version, no one passes the test of Last Judgment, except for Icarus. He represents the creative kind, whose legend never dies. He is the one mortal left to face his destiny, yet undecided, is it to be the rise, or the fall? The "911" triptych creates a concept of a life cycle that does not stop, that blasts energy even through death. The work is a new poetic representation of the human dream to reach powers which do not belong to the human nature. When the limits are being pushed to a critical point resulting in disaster, God is the one who is being called upon. In Jaisini's work, God is not rendered visually, but could be the painting's concept, a code of numbers for help, 9 1 1. The triptych has its aesthetic durability of a new confessional style. Review of "911" by Paul Jaisini
Copyright ©2002Yustas Kotz-Gottlieb. All rights reserved.
New York
send private comments to author YustasKGottlieb@aol.com

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Subject: master class for talented primary art extension classes


Author:
julie fearns pheasant
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 23:51:49 09/12/01 Wed

hello
I am from Australia and teach talented 10 to 12 year olds in a primary extension program run once a week , for ten weeks each term.
I usually run programs that have set themes, media and are fairly structured with the children following a set weekly instruction.
This term I have set up an apprentice 'master course', leaving the media, theme (even though there will be visits to outside markets, architecture eyc for idea brainstorming etc) up to the student... I thought the students would appreciate a course that would centre on their individual desires to work on a) subjects that interest them b) media that interest them c) technique they wish to skill expand on or to explore....
However - even though I'm old hat at this - suddenly after a long bout of the flu - I 'm stuck on how to run it exactly.
Has anyone ever done this? I know it does depend on the materials we have available so there has to be some form of structure...
my first lesson will be on visual mind mapping and visual journals.
Basically I guess I just need to sound this off someone else - and if you have any resourse sheets I could use...this flu has really knocked me for six...in return I have loads of programs I can exchange.
cheers julie

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Subject: Centers in the Art Room


Author:
deb dudley
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 16:29:52 07/18/01 Wed

With success, I used centers in my 1-5 Art room last year. The centers offered activities/lessons on days when a substitute was necessary or for students when they had completed their main lesson.
I would like to continue with this idea this year, and I’d like to discuss with other art teachers this concept.
What lessons have worked for you with centers?
Do you use centers during each class time?

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Subject: Tutoring HS Junior


Author:
Lisa
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 15:08:46 06/26/01 Tue

I am going to be tutoring a HS junior who wants to develop a portfolio for college applications. My background in teaching is K-8...any suggestions on what I should have her work on?

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Subject: Welcome to the Art Education Forum


Author:
Ken Rohrer
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 03:52:17 06/24/01 Sun

This forum focuses on visual arts education in the public schools in grades K-12. It is open to teachers, students, parents, artists, and homeschoolers. We welcome your posts to this forum.

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