VoyForums
1 CLICK GIVES FREE FOOD!
www.TheHungerSite.com
Protect Habitat with a Click!
www.TheRainforestSite.com
Non-profit ad served by VoyForums...

VoyUser Login optional ] [ Contact Forum Admin ] [ Main index ] [ Post a new message ] [ Search | Check update time | Archives: 1[2]345678910 ]


Spearfish Lake Tales
Spearfish Lake Tales Message Board
Welcome! This board is intended for discussion of Wes Boyd's writings as posted on Spearfish Lake Tales;
or other message boards. Discussion of other authors that frequent these boards or sites is not off topic.

Please keep it clean and somewhere close to being on topic.
Spearfish Lake Tales

Subject: It can't be fifty years


Author:
Wes
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 10:35:41 06/24/15 Wed

Another column lifted from the paper.

Boy, do I feel old right now.

My fiftieth high school class reunion was held over the weekend, and, good grief, that was a half a century ago.

I will be the first to admit that when I think of some of those people a mental picture of what they were like fifty years ago appears -- but in some cases that mental picture is unbelievably wrong. To be honest, some of my classmates still resemble who they were back in those days, but in so many cases I would find myself looking as someone and thinking, "Who the Sam Hill is this?" The differences between the two just do not compute.

There were twenty-four of us at the alumni banquet Saturday night. That's not bad out of a class of eighty-seven. Of that number, seven have passed on.

Our class has always stuck together as alumni better than most classes, and this has mostly been the result of one of our class members, a woman who I refer to as our "permanent de-facto class president." (Yes, she was the inspiration for Emily Holst!) She has made a hobby for the last fifty years of keeping up with the rest of us, and she's done a bang-up job of it. That has involved a lot of letters and phone calls over the years, and only more recently have email and things like Facebook been involved. Of the eighty class members, she has only lost track of two, although admittedly contact with some of the others has been rather tenuous. Having offered assistance in several classmate hunts around here over the years, I can tell you that's doing pretty darn good. The fact that in recent decades we have gotten together once every five years helps.

Although a surprising percentage of us are still more or less local, say, within fifty miles or so, there are people scattered all over the country, with a concentration, not surprising considering our age, located in Florida. The farthest anyone came for our reunion activities was from Arizona. We have several classmates who live in Texas -- one, interestingly, raises Bramah bulls, and another raises and trains race horses. You can take the boy out of the country . . .

A lot of the discussion involved "what are you doing these days" kinds of questions. Needless to say, many of us are retired or semi-retired, but there are at least a few of us who don't have plans to retire any time soon. Many of us have had health problems, some of them serious, and without doing a scientific survey and study I would have to say with some relief that I am among those lesser affected with serious health problems.

But a lot of the discussion also involved tales from back in the good old days. I heard some surprising stories of events back then, things I had never heard before. At least part of that was that there were stories that didn't cross from the girls to the boys or vice versa, at least back in those somewhat more innocent days -- but those were long ago, so maybe it didn't matter any more, and besides, at least some of those stories featured the two thirds of the class members who didn't make it to one of the reunion events over the weekend.

In spite of the good turnout of the class -- and roughly a third of the class showing up at one event or another is a very good turnout -- I still felt very curious about what had happened in the lives of those not present. For instance, I haven't heard much of anything about my best friend from high school in at least forty years, and of course he didn't show up.

All in all, though, I guess most of us turned out pretty average. Some of us have done well, and others not as well; luck has smiled on some of us, and not on others. There are stories there I have never heard, some of which I would like to, although the odds are that I won't.

On Saturday I went to my niece's graduation open house. "Just think," I told her. "In fifty years you can be going to your class reunion and be amazed at what's happened to everyone."
Replies:
Subject: Distant Shores ch 23


Author:
Ian
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 20:07:04 06/23/15 Tue

There is no link to ch 23 on the main page for Distant Shores, but you can get there by the Next link at the end of ch 22. There is a Next link to ch 24 at the end of ch 23 that fails with a 404 message.

Ian
Subject: Another Knick-Knack?


Author:
Greg B.
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 19:14:50 06/18/15 Thu

I happened to see this ad on Craigslist today, and while it's a bit smaller than Knick-Knack, it should give anyone who's curious a good idea what a MacGregor looks like:
http://losangeles.craigslist.org/sgv/boa/5077830294.html
Subject: Popular culture


Author:
Wes
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 12:54:44 06/17/15 Wed

Another column picked up from the paper.

The older I get, the more I find that I'm increasingly out of touch with popular culture -- and the less it bothers me.

I was leafing through Time magazine last night, and as I got back toward the back where they talk about the cultural stuff, I found myself glancing over headlines about this actor or that singer and thinking, "Who the Sam Hill is that?" I never heard of those people and probably am just as glad.

Now it's no secret that I don't watch much TV -- I've ranted about it for years -- but I'm beginning to percieve that I've missed some shows I probably would have enjoyed, or at least would like to have had a better idea of what happens. I'm thinking, The Mad Men, The Big Bang Theory, Orange is the New Black, and maybe one or two others. I've never seen a minute of any of them and the odds are likely that I probably never will. If it weren't for Deadliest Catch and occasionally the weather report, it seems unlikely that I would watch any TV at all.

I can hardly mention poplular culture without bringing up the Karadashians, who seem to be the epitome of mindless seeking of publicity for the sake of seeking publicity. As I have said before, "Why should I care?" What that family does is their own business, and if they want to do something off the wall, it's their decision to make, I guess, so long as it harms no one else. But while it's their business it's really none of my business, no matter how much they may want to make it otherwise.

Times have changed, I guess, and I haven't kept up with the change. I was at "fun run" the other day, and couldn't help but notice that several racers of both sexes seemed to have their smartphones stuck in their pockets. Now I suppose there is some legitimate reason for that -- there might be an app for heart rate, or they may be listening to music on their headphones to help stave off the boredom of running, or maybe something else. I can't help but notice that some of these kids and their phone are inseparable.

The other day I was in a restaurant and saw a couple of kids clearly out on a date. They both had their phones in front of them and were eagerly texting away, and I didn't see any evidence of them talking to each other, unless they were texting back and forth, which I wouldn't put past them.

I don't have a smartphone. I barely have a cell phone and actually rather resent having to have the thing these days, since I sometimes get testy about being interrupted by phone calls, especially while I'm driving. I don't like to talk on the phone when I'm driving and will pull to the side of the road if I get a call, but I keep seeing people driving down the road, yapping on their phones and not paying much attention to what they're doing.

I think someone has sent my cell phone a text two or three times, but I've never answered one. Frankly, I find it easier to talk on the phone in the first place. I'd prefer to not even have the phone at all, but everyone else in the family has overruled me.

I'm old-fashioned in other ways, too. I don't tweet -- I looked at Twitter once years ago and saw that it was pretty mindless. From what I pick up elsewhere, it's gotten worse. Facebook, I think I still have a Facebook page, but it's been years since I did anything with it and I never did much. I rarely look at people's Facebook pages since I have no desire to look at photos of what they had for breakfast. While I like cute cat photos to a reasonable extent, there is a limit -- after all with all the cats we have around the house, I prefer the real thing.

I could go on and on, but why bother? I'm behind the times and falling back, and I know it. Maybe that's one of the pleasures of being old -- being able to gripe about modern this or that. It's certainly one of the rights you get from being older.
Replies:
Subject: Pizza in Spearfish Lake


Author:
Nigel
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 07:12:20 06/02/15 Tue

I'm just wondering if the Parker's Pizza that's been referred to in recent Spearfish Lake books is a reference to Lazlo Zalezac's 'Parker's Perfect Pizza' (The Millionaire Next Door, which I had to go and re-read after about the third or fourth reference).
http://storiesonline.net/s/54088/the-millionaire-next-door
http://drupal.zalezac.com/node/689

If it is, then PPP must have branched out into takeaway-only sites, since in LZ's story it was definately a teenager-friendly fast food joint which was a popular hang-out spot.
Replies:
Subject: Citizenship


Author:
Freddy
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 21:22:23 05/29/15 Fri

You had the lawyer in "Distant Shores" say that the mother and child were not citizens. That is true for the mother, Mary.

However, for the child, Matty, that is not true. As the child of a US citizen (Matt), he is a citizen of the United States. There has been a lot of explanation of that in various media over the last six years, and it is well-settled law. Matty is also a citizen of Canada, having been born there, but he is also a US citizen whether he has been registered as one or not, and his mother cannot decline the citizenship for him.

If you doubt this, ask Senator Cruz of Texas, who was born in Canada to a US citizen mother.

Matt's death before the birth doesn't matter. Mary and Matt were married and the child was born within nine months of Matt's death.
Replies:
Subject: Couple of links missing on the website


Author:
weby
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 16:50:25 06/14/15 Sun

Not big issues, but I have been re-reading older stories on the site and hit couple of place with no link where one would be expected.

1) Chapter one of Bird On The Field does not have the "Forward to Next Chapter >>" link, instead it has only a "___>" and "To be continued . . ."

2)The maps page does not have any link back to the main page.
Subject: Bruce Bretthauer


Author:
Wes
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 00:04:36 06/03/15 Wed

It was just announced on the Beyond the Far Horizon forum that Bruce Bretthauer died yesterday.

He wrote some really imaginative and enjoyable stuff. He will be missed, and I will be among those missing him.

-- Wes
Replies:
Subject: Re: Hiding Patty


Author:
Sablesoft
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 22:13:57 08/26/14 Tue

Hi Wes,

Just noticed on your home page listing of books,

'Hiding Patty' is marked as 'A Tale From Spearfish Lake'
should this be 'Book 6 of the New Spearfish Lake series'

as you have added 'Bird in the Hand' as book 7 and there is no book 6.

Many Thanks for posting a fantastic series of books.

Ray
Replies:
Subject: Sisyphian green


Author:
Wes
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 12:30:31 05/27/15 Wed

Another column picked up from the paper.

After many rants on this subject in this space over the years, I suppose it's not news that I hate winter.

I love summer. I love being able to sit out on the patio in the evening, reading a book or whatever. I love being able to walk around in shirtsleeves, or drive around with the windows down, or just to see people walking down the street enjoying the nice weather. Naturally, I like watching girls wearing shorts. I like green on trees. When it rains, I enjoy the fact that it runs off or soaks in, rather than having to be shoveled or plowed.

But there is one thing I absolutely hate about summer: grass -- or to be specific, lawns. Oh, I suppose they're all right to look at but I hate having to be a slave to them, mowing them what seems like every few minutes.

I come by my dislike of lawn mowing honestly. When I was a kid, my folks decided they wanted a large yard, and wound up with about two acres of it, much of it rough and hilly. Of course, since they had a son, guess who got to mow it -- with a push mower? On top of that I had to mow my grandparents' lawn, which was only slighly smaller.

Have you ever heard of the myth of Sisyphus? He was the guy the gods sentenced to eternally roll a rock uphill? When he got it to the top of the hill it would roll back down, and he'd have to do it all over again. Believe me, those lawns taught me just exactly how he felt, and the advent of riding mowers didn't change my attitude about lawns any.

I don't have to mow my grandparents' lawn any more, but I now live at what was my parents' house and there are still two acres of sometimes rough, sometimes steep lawn to mow. I have said on numerous occasions that if I ever have my way I'll fence off about three-quarters of it and let natural succession take its course. However, I always seem to lose that argument.

For some reason I could never get my daughter to mow it when she was growing up, but at least her husband is doing it for the time being -- at least when the mower is running, which it hasn't been of late. The mower we have is old enough to vote, and it has paid its dues. We had a lot of trouble getting it started last summer, and it has been worse this year. By hook and by crook Dan and I managed to get the thing running a couple of times and mowed the lawn, which grew back about as fast and we could run the mower over it.

So the last time we went to get the mower going (it took both of us) it wouldn't start. Getting someone to work on the thing is difficult, especially since I don't have a way to take it to a repair shop. I won't go into all of the ins and outs of the problem, but by the time we finally got the stupid thing to start, the grass was knee deep. I was beginning to wish that I had fenced the place off and put horses or goats or something inside the fence -- which might not be a bad idea on the surface but it strikes me as another thing that could be so Sisyphian to be beyond belief. We finally got it working, but somewhere along we way we managed to screw up the switch that turns the mower deck on.

But the grass was still growing. Finally I caved in and decided to see if I could get someone to mow it commerically before I had to call in a logging crew to deal with the fast-growing jungle.

I hate voicemail. I left messages in a number of different places over the course of a couple of weeks and got no response. Well, if someone doesn't want to to the job I'm not going to stand over them with a shotgun, but it would have been nice to get a call back from someone saying, "Sorry, my list is full up."

How about the neighbor whose lawn I mowed a couple times last year when his mower was broken down? He never answers his voicemail. So much for that great notion.

I finally got a call back from a local guy this weekend. He agreed to mow the lawn to at least get it under control again, but at a price I'd be hesitant to pay on a regular basis. So there's that problem solved for the moment, but now I have to deal with the issue of fixing the mower or deciding whether I want to keep throwing good money after bad.

You can't win against a lawn.
Replies:
Subject: Reuben James


Author:
Jon
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 21:19:54 05/17/15 Sun

The reference about the US Navy destroyer, Reuben James, made me curious to the story. This is in "Distant Shores", chapter 7.

Wikipedia showed the US Navy Rueben James, DD245, as being the first US ship to be sunk in WWII on 31 October 1941.
Link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Reuben_James_(DD-245)

My memory of the name is from the movie, "Hunt for Red October".
From Wikipedia: "Reuben James played a significant role in Tom Clancy's 1986 novel Red Storm Rising. She appeared in the 1990 movie, The Hunt for Red October (although her appearance in the film was anachronistic, since she was commissioned about a year after the events in the film). In some scenes, Reuben James was portrayed in the film by another Oliver Hazard Perry frigate — USS Wadsworth (now ORP Generał Tadeusz Kościuszko)".
link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Reuben_James_(FFG-57)
Subject: 70th VE Day


Author:
Leo Kerr
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 20:05:37 05/08/15 Fri

vaguely inspired by the other thread, "Oldies but goodies" about medium-old airplanes.

Today being the 70th anniversary of Victory in Europe Day for WW-II, a special exemption happened today: something like 56 WWII era trainers, fighters and bombers flew east across the Potomac River, over the Lincoln Memorial, the Reflecting Pool, and the World War II Memorial, before passing south of the Washington Monument, and over throngs of people filling the National Mall in Washington, DC.

Little fighters and trainers, like little bi-planes in slick formation, Mustangs, and up to gull-wing Corvairs, to somewhat exotics, like a twin-boom P-51 Lightning, or the big: B-17s, and even Fifi, the only (at the moment) airworthy B-29 Superfortress, not unlike the more well known Bock's Car or even more-so, Enola Gay.

Most of these airplanes were likely 65-80 years old - impressive for a car; astounding for something that flies! Heck; the last time I saw Fifi, back in the early 2000s, it traveled the air-show circuit and would take passengers up for short flights. The day I was there, negative: they couldn't get more than three engines running at a time.

But here they were; an impressive but mismatched fleet of historic aviation, flying through some of the most highly restrictive air-space in North America -- a fraction of a mile south of the White House, flying straight at the Capital, flying through the main approach path to Reagan/National DCA. And just a few weeks after a postman landed a gyrocopter on the Capital grounds. In fact, my first thought as I and countless other workers headed back into our respective buildings (and tourists, as well,) was: did the weight of the paperwork have to at least equal the weight of an airplane before it (the plane and pilot) were cleared for this little adventure?

Maybe it reflects poorly on something - me or our [paranoid-security-] culture - that even as someone who works in a history museum, my first thought was about the logistics of this incredible display. How many of these people, flying airplanes probably significantly older than them, had even flown in any sort of formation before?

Unlike Duane, who exists only in our minds, who fell into his dream job in the Grand Canyon National Park, I do have something of a dream job: for someone with an interest in museums, where I work has a reputation -- deserved or not -- on par with some of our grandest National Parks as wonders of our world. And all too often, it is easy to get lost into the details, and even forget that our job is not just "a job," but is to enable the millions of tourists and academics access to some remarkable things. Things that talk. Things-- like those next door to me, are often pretty much stuffed.

Even diagonally across the Mall, our little aviation museum, with its staff of restoration artists, tends to restore aircraft -- for being stuffed.

Four years ago, in my first visit to the Grand Canyon area, I was driving up Highway 64 toward the Park entrance, and saw a sign for the Planes of Fame Air Museum. Okay, being a museum worker, I guess I'm something of a museum junkie. I diverted off and decided to spend a few minutes checking the place out. I ended up having an amazing three hour visit with one of the two paid staff (airplane mechanic, restoration specialist, pilot, exhibit designer, exhibit maintainer, fund-raiser, conservator, and Museum Director) as well as the volunteer who ran the gift-shop and sold admission tickets.

There were no Imax movies, fancy interactive computers, or all of those crazy bells and whistles that modern museum-goers expect. Or, at least, things that many of us who work in museums seem to think that modern museum-goers expect to see. Instead, there were airplanes. Lots of them. Jumbled together. With some amazing diversity of aircraft. And there was something really amazing about most of these airplanes: not only were they being restored or fully restored, but most of them were in flying condition.

And were flown.

Maybe not regularly. Or even often. But that potential was there. Something that the Enola Gay will never do. But that Mitsubishi Zero out in Arizona? Maybe. Granted, it would never fly in a formation like that which flew over DC today -- being on the wrong side -- and in the Pacific Theatre, at that.


When I started writing this, I really didn't know where I was going with it. Nor did I have any idea it was going to be so long. I guess the only thing that came to mind was that this might be a good outlet for it. And looking back at what I've written, I wonder if maybe it's something of a lesson at least for museum professionals: to not get so caught up in stuffing artifacts, but to remember that they have a reason. A cause. A life or soul of their own. And that maybe our idealized museums aren't really the best. Just the biggest.

But anyway, if any of you have made it this far, and you're ever in the Flagstaff / Grand Canyon area, and have the slightest interest in aviation.. support a museum who is, in some ways, struggling as hard as Debbie Elkstalker-Evachevski and her fellow kataras, to preserve not just the "stuff" of flight, but also the soul of flight.

Note also: in this, there should be enough clues for someone to figure out where I work. This has no formal or official connection with that place or my job there. I just hope I'm not making a fool out of myself doing this.

Leo
Replies:
Subject: Diane Caldwell/Matt Caldwell


Author:
Jerry
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 05:25:51 05/12/15 Tue

Diane Caldwell was a Bradford '88 student who died of leukemia in ninth grade.

Was she related to Matt Caldwell, of Blanche Tickle Girl?
Replies:
Subject: Oldies but goodies


Author:
Wes
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 11:50:21 03/31/15 Tue

Another column lifted from the paper.

I was swinging through one of the national news pages to see if I could kindle an idea for a column, and happened to notice that today is the sixtieth anniversary of the first flight of the B-52.

The big bomber has been around for a long time. Although it first flew sixty years ago, the actual roots of the design go back even further than that. The Air Force still has about ninety of them flying, and all of them are over half a century old, since the last of them were built in 1963. The big old bird has outlasted several newer planes, mostly because it has been proven fairly easy to upgrade and modify for a variety of missions over the years. At present, the Air Force plans to keep operating them until the 2040s, which when you stop and think about it is pretty amazing for a combat aircraft.

The part that really seems amazing is that the B-52 was designed in a period when aircraft design was changing rapidly. In World War II, which wasn't very far in memory when the pencils for the B-52 first hit the drawing board, an aircraft a year or two out of date was a hazard to its crew from being so obsolete -- yet the B-52 has hung on forever.

The B-52 is not the only aircraft out of the 1950s that has hung on forever doing just exactly the job it was expected to do, and no matter how much technology has changed, it still is nearly impossible to replace with something better. The C-130 was first conceived of in 1951 and first flew in 1954. They are still being built.

The C-130 is pretty close to a universal airplane. It has done everything. Designed as a cargo plane, it has been used for just about anything that can be crowded into its cavernous interior, everything from gunship to hurricane hunter, spy plane to forest fire control, from bomber to tanker. Don't get me wrong -- it's a BIG airplane, and I know, for I was a passenger in one several times almost fifty years ago. But big as it was, that didn't keep the Navy with experimenting with flying them off a carrier deck. Although they decided to not go through with it operationally, they are still the biggest airplane to ever fly off an aircraft carrier.

In the late 1960s the Air Force decided to explore the idea of a C-130 replacement and came up with the idea of a design competition. Lockheed entered the C-130 in the competition -- and won! Only now is the Air Force halfway serious about considering a C-130 replacement, and it probably will not go into production until the 2040s, if at all.

The U-2 reconnaissance aircraft, also a 1950s design, is still flying and will probably be well into the future. The Air Force also operates KC-135s, which were early model Boeing 707s, also dating from the 1950s.

It extends to helicopters, too -- the UH-1 "Huey" and CH-47 Chinook are both 1950s designs, and are still in active use. The Army is now phasing out the UH-1, but the venerable CH-47 is still in production, and there are other slightly younger designs that are coming up on their fiftieth anniversary.

Old aircraft designs staying active for decades is not just a military thing, either. I can rattle off several civilian planes that are still in use -- and some still in production, after fifty and sixty years of service. It is not unusual for a single airplane to remain in use for forty or fifty years, with good maintenance and equipment upgrades as needed.

The point that comes to me out of all this is that developments in aviation just aren't coming as fast as they once did -- but that once they get things right they might as well keep them right. Or, to say it in a different way, just because it's new doesn't necessarily mean that it's better. It's something we all ought to bear in mind.
Replies:
Subject: Bird On The Field


Author:
Captain Sarcastic
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 03:09:31 04/20/15 Mon

Your latest episode has ex-football players talking about revenge. In real life, revenge happens, and it doesn't matter if the targets of the revenge had anything to do with the alleged "violation" of the aggrieved football players. I was there for such a situation, and I managed to avoid most of the violence, but others were not so lucky. Other violence I was not able to avoid.

When the Columbine massacre happened, and it turned out that the perpetrators were getting even for violence done to them, my reaction was "Wow, I didn't think of that." High school bullying has had a horrific effect on MANY people, and only basic decency has kept the victims from killing their tormentors. Do not expect the people who have been beaten and tormented to avoid extreme violence. Rifles and shotguns do not respect strength and violent tendencies. Your story has retribution against bullies that was not deadly. In real life, I was a few minutes away from extreme violence (another story of yours has that, but with an intervention that I didn't get).

You can write your story any way you want, but just understand -- the football players in your story are one violent act from causing extreme hardship, and they are one violent act from being killed. Several football players from my past avoided death ... and they will never know how close they came.
Replies:
Subject: Distant Shores posting begins


Author:
Wes
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 13:42:31 05/03/15 Sun

I just posted the first chapter of Distant Shores. There are 36 chapters.

RTF files, mobis, epubs, and PDFs are available from the Spearfish Lake Tales Store. Sales on Lulu for hardcopies, epubs and PDFs have also been enabled.

Preorders have been shipped.

I will be gone Sunday afternoon and early evening Eastern Daylight Time, but will be back in the late evening. Very often when I put up a new story there are html bugs that don't show up when I tested it locally. I will check in when I get back to deal with any of those issues that you bring to my attention, or to ship out orders that have come in.

Have fun reading Distant Shores!

-- Wes
Subject: Follow on story to BOTH?


Author:
Michael Slade
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 21:22:09 04/28/15 Tue

With chapter 32 of BOTF now posted, it is obvious that there is plenty of unresolved plot points that have not been resolved!

Apparently Courtney is a cheerleader who did not get caught and has not confessed - how are the Code of Conduct violators going to treat her? For that matter, many of the students who were not at the beer bust must know or will know that she was there-how will they treat her?

And then there is the big question that I can't see Wes answering in the one remaining chapter - what happens with the football team and how does the community react?
Replies:
Subject: An interesting article on photography in the Grand Canyon


Author:
Mike
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 15:17:10 04/28/15 Tue

Worth reading - photography in the Grand Canyon:

http://www.msn.com/en-us/travel/tripideas/the-grand-picture-at-the-grand-canyon/ar-BBiJmxQ

I grew up in my dad's photo studio, rocking trays at 8, doing protraits at 12. I can still remember the smell of the developer, stop bath (weak acetic acid) and "fixer" solution (sodium thiosulfate, aka "hypo").
Replies:
Subject: 'Desert Goddess' Remembers a Lost Arizona Paradise


Author:
Jon
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 22:19:24 04/26/15 Sun

via National Geographic "Sunday Stills"

link: http://video.nationalgeographic.com/video/short-film-showcase/damnation-desert-goddess-remembers-arizonas-glen-canyon?utm_source=NatGeocom&utm_medium=Email&utm_content=pom_20150426&utm_campaign=Content

cut and paste into your browser may apply

'Desert Goddess' Remembers a Lost Arizona Paradise

When the Glen Canyon Dam was approved in April 1956, a group of archaeologists and river runners set out to document more than 250 culturally significant sites and 125 side canyons that would be flooded by the project. One of those river runners was Katie Lee, a folk singer and Hollywood starlet turned activist. “I never dream about it,” Lee says. “It’s because it’s on my mind all day long, every day. I don't need to dream about it. I think about it all the time ... What was lost? Eden.”
Subject: Distant Shores, new book from Spearfish Lake Tales, now available for preorder


Author:
Wes
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 18:49:36 04/26/15 Sun

The next book from Spearfish Lake Tales, Distant Shores, is now available for preorder. It's Book Three of the Full Sails series.

Here's the summary:

It takes the death of his son Matt for Adam Caldwell to realize that his life is in a rut with a job and a wife that he's long since lost interest in, and he needs to change things somehow. He's not sure what he wants to do with the rest of his life, or how to go about doing it. Buying a sailboat and following in his son's footsteps seems to offer some potential for building a life he can enjoy. It's not a simple process and there are storms to face, more of them on land than at sea before he can reach the distant shores of happiness.

There are a total of thirty-six chapters.

You can preorder Distant Shores for as little as $19.99 through the Spearfish Lake Tales Store Distant Shores page. Preorders will be sent sometime on the afternoon of May 3, Eastern Daylight Time.

-- Wes
Subject: Bird On the Field posting begins


Author:
Wes
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 18:54:45 02/15/15 Sun

I just posted the first chapter of Bird on the Field. There are 27 chapters.

RTF files, mobis, epubs, and PDFs are available from the Spearfish Lake Tales Store. Sales on Lulu for hardcopies, epubs and PDFs have also been enabled.

Preorders have been shipped. Very often when I put up a new story there are html bugs that don't show up when I tested it locally. I'll stay up until around midnight EST to deal with any of those issues that you bring to my attention. I'll also be available until then if you want to order a book and I should be able to ship it right out.

The opening chapter is a bit of a prologue, but the next chapter picks up right where Bird in the Hand left off, although it goes in a different direction. For those who aren't familiar with it, there is some American football toward the end of it, but I've tried to simplify things for international readers.

Have fun reading Bird on the Field!

-- Wes
Replies:
Subject: Creating Photos


Author:
Wes
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 13:47:37 03/20/15 Fri

Sometimes when the desire to write has gone away for a while, I'll spend some time creating photos, usually in an older program, Paint Shop Pro 7. I've had this program for years and am familiar with it, so I use it. I'm not opposed to using old software if it works and does the job, and sometimes it works better than the newer stuff.

A lot of my creating photos involves making covers for my books. It's not quite as easy as it sounds, since covers have to be composed specially to allow room for the lettering. Very often the photos I need for covers aren't cropped right and I have to massage them a little -- it's going to happen in the book after next, for example.

For my purposes, it's necessary to find public domain photos that I can legally re-use. Very often I can take the photo myself, but sometimes I can't. If needed, I can often find the photo I want for a cover, like Bird In the Hand, but not always. When that happens, I have to create a photo, like I did for Bird On the Field, which has pieces of six different photos in it, four of which I took myself; the other two are public domain images.

Over the years I've gotten fairly good at creating such photos. Sometimes it doesn't work well -- I'm not very happy with the cover for Stray Kitten, for example. It's not easy -- the lighting and the resolution have to be right, and sometimes they aren't and other tricks are necessary. It's usually possible for an expert or a trained eye to see the little errors and inconsistencies that are inherent in a created photo, but at least when I create a photo it carries the message I want it to carry.

Which leads to an interesting question: Is it right to use a "fictional" photo to illustrate a book of fiction? I think so. To quote someone in an upcoming book: "Photos lie. In fact, they lie all the time, from the moment they're taken. They're isolating a view from what is going on around them. It's just that in the digital age, it's easier to lie with them."

Now, most of you know that I publish a small weekly newspaper. Our rule is that we do not massage photos in such a way as to change the meaning. We may fiddle with things like cropping, lightening or darkening, and such things. I have been known to wipe out a prominent and embarrassing zit on a kid's face because it doesn't change the meaning of a photo that might have been taken because the kid won an award or something, but I don't go very far beyond that.

All of that said, sometimes it's just fun to create an "impossible" photo -- something that never existed in the first place, or something that happened where no one was around to take the photo. I'm going to share a couple of recent ones with you, and will give you links to high resolution versions suitable for computer backdrops. The photos -- and the discussion about them -- are at Creating Photos on the Shorts and Rants page.
Replies:
Subject: 60 Years of the Chevy Small Block V-8


Author:
Boyd Percy
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 20:53:45 03/23/15 Mon

Wes talked about the small block Chevy V-8 in his Bullring Days 2: Bradford Speedway book. The link shows an interesting video of one disassembled, cleaned , reassembled and painted.



https://autos.yahoo.com/news/60-years-of-small-block--we-salute-chevy-s-iconic-v-8-engine-133409699.html
Subject: Sled Dog Racing


Author:
Jon
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 15:56:33 03/15/15 Sun

Sled Dog Racing is receiving some media attention lately.

The On-line edition of the New York Times had a short article about the number of women mushers in this year's Iditarod, around 25% of the entrants. The piece was published March 14, 2015
Titled "Enduring the Iditarod as Equals" was in the Sports section
Link: http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/14/sports/women-of-the-iditarod.html?ref=sports&_r=0
Today, March 15, 2015, the weekly National Geographic "Sunday Stills", Issue 35 has a piece on the running of the 2015 Yukon Quest.

Link: http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2015/02/150220-yukon-quest-dogs-sledding-race-alaska/?utm_source=NatGeocom&utm_medium=Email&utm_content=pom_20150315&utm_campaign=Content

Cutting and pasting of the links into your fav browser may be necessary!
Replies:
Subject: Re: Offenhauser 97-110 Series Midget Engine


Author:
Nick Tooth
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 20:52:41 03/14/15 Sat

I am planning to build a 1920's style Indy two seat racer and have been looking for a Miller style 4 cyl engine and I think an Offy would fit the bill. You say that you have engines of this type for sale, could you reply with phone number so that we could talk about a suitable engine for my project ? Thank you ......Nick
>This is a very rare opportunity for a serious
>collector or for historic automotive museums.
>I have for sale aOffenhauser 97-110 Series Midget
>Engine . This engine is Brand New Old Stock. It has
>never been started. It is a true time capsule. This is
>one of the last engines produced by Drake Engineering.
>It has all the latest style parts that were being used
>at the end of the Offenhauser Legacy. To my knowledge
>every part is brand new. With the exception of the
>rebuilt Hilborn fuel pump and the rebuilt Joe Hunt
>Magneto. It is fit with a Moldex crankshaft and
>Carrillo connecting rods. This engine was assembled by
>the late Bob Nowicke . Bob was a successful USAC
>Midget car owner from the 1950"s and on. Bob had a
>long list of USAC notable drivers including, Mario
>Andretti, Gary Bettenhausen, A J Foyt, Elmer George,
>Parnelli Jones, Lloyd Ruby and Bob Tattersall. He
>accumulated numerous USAC victories. He was also well
>known in the Indy 500 circles as the representative
>for the Primmer Hardware Co. providing fasteners to
>the Indy 500 teams for years.
>As you can see the engine is complete right down to
>the Kurtis Kraft style throttle linkage.
>I have been involved in rebuilding Offy Midget engines
>for over 30 years and have never come across such a
>butiful Midget engine. It is a true collector"s piece.
>I don"t think you will find a more complete NEW NEVER
>STARTED OFFENHAUSER ENGINE in existence. I also have
>other Offy midget engines and parts.
Replies:
Subject: Dog gone it


Author:
Boyd Percy
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 16:31:36 03/10/15 Tue

For you fans of dogs:

I read today the Iditarod is scheduled for a new route this year because a lack of snow. It will run from Fairbanks to Nome.

Shaggy the stray Newfoundland who had been eluding capture for 8 months is now in a shelter for feral dogs in Michigan.
Replies:
Subject: Jack, Vixen, and real life bird brains...


Author:
nqs
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 12:53:53 03/09/15 Mon

spotted this via reddet today:

http://www.goodnewsnetwork.org/bird-thought-to-be-extinct-re-emerges-in-myanmar/
Subject: appreciation II


Author:
Leo Kerr
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 18:51:55 02/24/15 Tue

I know I mentioned something back near New Year's about the time and effort Wes spends on us, but tonight's episode of Bird on the Field reminded me of something else.

In the last couple of years, I've had the chance to do some traveling for work; trade shows, factory training, and the like. Having read in Dawnwalker (especially) and some others about people just hopping in the car and doing some long-haul cruises, well.. okay, so in addition to the work-sponsored training, I took some vacation days around it, and while not just doing interstate driving, well, drove.

Twice, now, mostly across the country, as far north as Nebraska, south to central AZ and NM, and twice around Lake Michigan.

So with Jack talking about birding places -- I've been there (Seney, for example.)

So, Wes, thanks for encouraging me to look at the country as something other than fly-over.

Leo
Replies:
Subject: Amazing bird picture


Author:
Jeremy
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 22:21:32 03/03/15 Tue

I wonder what Jack would give for a picture like this!
Woodpecker with passenger
Replies:
Subject: eBooks


Author:
Ian
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 06:20:32 03/03/15 Tue

Just looked at the Online Book Links page.

I suggest it's worth a mention that many public libraries, at least in the UK, Australia and the US, allow downloading eBooks. And some public libraries allow visitors to join as well as locals.
Pro : it's usually free ; most of the books are reasonably modern ; you can read on your PC or by using a reader app on your tablet.
Con : most libraries don't have many eBooks (that is, in the hundreds although some have thousands) ; some only allow eBooks to be borrowed for 7 days, although others allow up to 21 days ; some libraries only allow eBooks to be downloaded to the PC/tablet when you are in-country (inconvenient if you are travelling out of country).

Ian
Subject: Bird on the Field, next book from Spearfish Lake Tales now available for preorder


Author:
Wes
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 19:19:45 02/08/15 Sun

The next book from Spearfish Lake Tales, Bird On the Field, is now available for preorder. It's Book Eight of the New Spearfish Lake series, and also Book Two of the "Bird" sub-series.

Here's the summary:

Things around Spearfish Lake High School are unsettled after the superintendent is shown the door and the high school principal leaves abruptly. Math teacher Brandy Wine is named principal, with orders to get school discipline and especially the football team under control. The football team's traditional but highly illegal pre-practice beer bust is in jeopardy since the guy who's supposed to get the beer is in jail. Jack and Vixen along with their friends are considering where to go to college and trying to stay above the hassles, since they have problems of their own, while Jack's younger brother Howie is starting to realize he's having trouble with his girlfriend. Things are going to be changing around Spearfish Lake when the dust settles!

The main story of Bird On the Field picks up right after the end of Bird In the Hand, although it takes off in a different direction. It sure is proving to be an interesting summer around Spearfish Lake!

There are a total of thirty-three chapters.

You can preorder Bird On the Field for as little as $19.99 through the Spearfish Lake Tales Store Bird On The Field page. Preorders will be sent sometime on the afternoon of February 15, Eastern Standard Time.

-- Wes
Replies:
Subject: Towing Service


Author:
Dave
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 05:54:15 02/09/15 Mon


I'm surprised when John and Sally visited the Lawyer he didn't mention the problems with the Towing Service Company. That's still a potential problem as the Towing Company is stating Sally's personal property now belongs to them.
Subject: STENDEC and Good Night


Author:
Wes
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 15:21:48 03/31/14 Mon

Another column lifted from the paper.

-----------------------

As of this writing on Monday, no real trace of the missing Malasian 370 Boeing 777 has turned up, despite a huge effort in the Indian Ocean west of Australia. There is intense media coverage, and the disappearance of the airliner is still full of mystery -- and it may well remain that way for some time.

I've been following this story more closely than I do some things in the news, and it particularly ground at me one day last week when some network reporter made the comment that "No airliner has just disappeared like this before."

That was a stupid statement, and it was just plain wrong. It has happened -- just not recently.

One of the more curious of aviation mysteries was the disappearance of three different British South Amerian Airways airlines in the late 1940s.

Perhaps the most famous of the three was the mystery of the Star Dust (all of the planes bore names.) On August 2, 1947, Star Dust vanished during a flight from Buenos Aires to Santiago, Chile. A comprehensive search of a wide area was fruitless, and the incident was left as a vast mystery.

A secondary mystery in the Star Dust incident was the last word received from the airliner, send in Morse code by its radio operator, a single word, repeated several times: "STENDEC." What did that mean? No one knows, and despite many theories raised over the years, no one still knows for sure; it seems likely that no one will ever know.

But one of the theories that endured for many years was that Star Dust had been taken up by a UFO -- in fact, a UFO magazine many years ago was named STENDEC after the incident. (And yes, true believers have already voiced the theory that UFOs were responsible for Malaysian 370's disappearance.)

On January 30, 1948 another British South American Airways airliner, Star Tiger, disappeared without a trace between the Azores and Bermuda, in what many have now designated "The Bermuda Triangle." Twenty-six airplanes searched for nearly a thousand hours, but no trace of the airplane ever turned up. Among the passengers was Air Marshal Sir Arthur Coningham, a hero of World War II. Coningham's death shared the front page of the Jnuary 31 edition of the New York Times along with the news of the assassination of Mahatma Gandhi and the death of Orville Wright.

Then, on January 17, 1949, a third British South Amerian Airways airliner, similar to the other two, Star Ariel, disappeared between Bermuda and Jamaica. In spite of an extensive search, no signs of wreckage, debris, or oil slicks was ever found.

British South American Airways didn't have a lot of luck with their planes -- there were four other fatal crashes in the five years of their existence.

The disappearance of Star Tiger, Star Ariel, and especially Star Dust were one of aviation's enduring mysteries for more than half a century, and as noted above, UFOs were but one theory.

At least we now know what happened to Star Dust. In the last 1990s a pair of Argentine mountain climbers discovered wreckage from the plane in a glacier on Mount Tupungato in the Argentine Andes. Apparently when the plane hit the mountain, it set off an avalanche that buried the wreckage immediately; it stayed buried until the glacier started spitting out the wreckage many years later. The fate of Star Tiger and Star Ariel remains a mystery.

This is not the 1940s; radar and satellites keep much better track of airliners than they used to, so the disappearance of Malaysian 370 is a huge mystery. But the last words from the plane, "All right. Good night." leave open as many questions as "STENDEC."
Replies:
Subject: John Engler's reading habits?


Author:
Kim Hansen
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 09:52:45 02/04/15 Wed

I am confused about John Engler's reading habits. In chapter 17 he explains to Teresa that he doesn't read for enjoyment but only to study, and that's why she she mostly found books about first aid and such things.

But in chapter 21 both John and Sally find mystery books on a closet bookshelf and read them at the patio. This seems contradictorily, or did I misunderstand something?
Replies:
Subject: Bullring type people looking for old Indy 500 car


Author:
Andrew Haworth
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 02:13:59 01/17/15 Sat

You have to be quick, the auction is today 17th Jan, for 1968 Granatelli STP turbine Indy car on auction block at Scottsdale Ariz.

It is the Andy Granatelli and Colin Chapman inspired Graham Hill, Indianapolis 500 ride, one of the first turbine engines ever used in an Indy car.

http://autoweek.com/article/indycar/1968-lotus-turbine-powered-indy-car-barrett-jackson
Replies:
Subject: Awesome Bill from Dawsonville


Author:
Boyd Percy
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 14:53:56 01/31/15 Sat

I read where Bill Elliot was inducted into the NASCAR Hall of Fame on January 30th. He was mentioned in "Cattail".
Replies:
Subject: Photo Post of January 30, 2015


Author:
Boyd Percy
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 23:25:03 01/29/15 Thu

I liked the fact that your photo reminded us of the importance of exercising our civic right and duty. It's amazing to realize that it's almost 3 months since the federal election day in the U.S. (11-4-2014) Your photo looks almost identical to our polling place except we don't have a computer, just a large folio book with all the registered voters in that particular precinct. We have to sign by our names in the book. All the poll commissioners in our precinct are all older females. I guess they may be the bedrock of any democracy, at least in my experience. I later learned that in my state, Louisiana, all citizens 65 or older can vote by mail. I plan to do that in the future.
Subject: The Last Place You Look and cars.....


Author:
Jon
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 22:17:47 01/20/15 Tue

Reading with interest, John Engler's involvement with his Jaguar, brings to mind the lines from the movie "Silver Streak" when Gene Wilder and Richard Pryor are stealing a car to catch up with the Silver Streak. Gene's character is offering up rather mundane cars and Pryor's character is looking elsewhere.....

Grover Muldoon (Richard Pryor):
I'm following the plan. Just changed my mind.

George Caldwell (Gene Wilder):
Are you crazy? I thought we were gonna take the Chevy in back.

Grover Muldoon:
Chevy? That's a jerk-off, man. This here is pure pussy.

George Caldwell:
Pure pussy? Tell that to the judge.

Is John Engler saying something about his conquests with a Jaguar?
Subject: Last Place You Look - Jan 11 update


Author:
dotB aka K Pelle
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 20:27:15 01/11/15 Sun

Ouch - been in the heroes shoes on that one, so this is almost a look down memory lane - two ex's and a two bedroom apartment in my case, which is probably even a little more crowded.

I survived, but that session was the reason I found myself a single room cabin out in the woods for a year or two.
A; nobody knew where I lived and B; nobody wanted to put up with no electricity, no indoor plumbing and no telephone, let alone a mile long trek thorough deep woods to get there. It sure was a pretty place though and the fish darn near jumped out of the lake onto a hook every morning - but even fresh fish for breakfast pales after a while. Then too holding down job was a bit of a rough trip in the winter because the roads socked in with about two feet of snow and the snowplows did come by too often.

K Pelle
Subject: Chapter 12 - LPYL


Author:
Big Al
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 14:03:45 01/11/15 Sun

Your stopping points for most chapters are logical breaking points and well thought out. However, I think this one is cruel and unusual punishment for your readers especially as we need to wait over the weekend for the next chapter. Worse is I'm traveling tonight and won't see the chapter until the early hours of Monday morning.

Thanks for all the excellent stories.
Subject: Mischief in memory


Author:
Wes
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 12:35:28 01/09/15 Fri

Another column picked up from the paper.

Thanks to the lousy weather and the holiday letdown, I would have had a really severe case of cabin fever over the weekend if the mailman hadn’t showed up with a book I’ve been wanting to read for years. Actually, it was a compilation of eight books by an Englishman named H.W. Tilman, and even with all the time I had free I’m still only a third of the way or so through the fascinating series of tales he tells.

Tilman was an original, or the last of his breed, or something. For centuries, explorers have headed out to see what’s over the next hill, in search of El Dorado or Cibola, or just to see what’s out there that no one has seen before -- even by air. But by the nineteen-twenties and thirties, the world was running out of such places, and mostly those places were pretty remote and inhospitable, like Antarctica or the more desolate reaches of the Himalayas.

Now, Tilman was a mountaineer and was on several attempts to climb Mt. Everest. In between Everest attempts, he spent an awful lot of time poking around in hitherto unknown places in the Himalayas. But by the nineteen-fifties even those places were becoming known and at times even crowded.

Even though Tilman was now in his fifties -- he was born in 1898 -- his call to adventure was no less strong. He wound up buying a sailboat with the idea of sailing it to otherwise hard-to-reach mountains to climb. Places like Patagonia, Greenland, the Antarctic Peninsula and several desolate sub-Antarctic islands.

The boat he bought, a 45-foot Bristol Pilot Cutter built in 1906 named Mischief took him a good many such places over the next twenty-five years. These were no short voyages, either; his first such expedition, exploring a glacier in Patagonia at the far end of South America, took him a little over a year, with only about six weeks of it actually spent in climbing. Other voyages were as long.

He didn’t always head for the southern ocean; in later years he led crews of a handful of men on voyages to places like Greenland and the Canadian arctic. He wrote about his adventures with a dry wit and a real talent for understatement. What they represent is a last look at the way some things used to be done.

The advent of GPS technology and the ready availability of satellite mapping and imaging has closed forever the ‘heroic’ era of expedition travel in which Tilman achieved many notable objectives. Tilman’s famous comment on the early Everest expeditions, that “any worthwhile expedition can be planned on the back of an envelope.” applied equally to his high latitude voyages. Apart from sextant, compass and a short wave radio receiver for time signals and shipping forecasts, his boats carried no technology, no liferaft and only very basic rations for the crew.

To find a crew, Tilman would either rely on recommendations from personal networks or would resort to the insertion of a brief notice in the Times, typically ‘Hands wanted for long voyage in small boat: no pay, no prospects, not much pleasure’. That the crew were not asked to contribute financially towards the voyages led Tilman to expect that they would accept his leadership and judgement without question.

At the age of 80, Tilman was on his way to the Antarctic again, this time on a boat owned and captained by a younger man. The boat disappeared between Rio de Janerio and the Falkland Islands; no trace was ever found. Somehow it’s easy to think Tilman would have been satisfied with that.

I’d like to say that the world is a poorer place without Tilman in it, but that wouldn’t be exactly right. The world doesn’t have much room or need for someone like Tilman any more, and that’s what makes it a poorer place.
Replies:
Subject: "Growing Together" now on Amazon, Nook and Kobo


Author:
Wes
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 19:28:26 01/06/15 Tue

The revised version of Growing Together has been posted on Amazon, Barnes and Noble Nook, and Kobo. Go to the Spearfish Lake Tales Store Growing Together page, where you can find links to getting the book.

Just as a reminder:

Jon is white and Tanisha is black. They’ve lived together for five years, hiding from a wrathful father and a vindictive brother. Despite some trepidations, they love their new lives, jobs, and friends. When their best friend is involved in a nationally publicized incident, discovery seems likely. Dealing with that requires resourceful thinking and direct action, but things are not always as they seem. As a result, their lives will change more than they can imagine.

-- Wes
Subject: Photo Post of 1-5-2015


Author:
Boyd Percy
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 23:57:38 01/04/15 Sun

What food is the woman dishing up in the photo. Is it beef and noodles?
Replies:
Subject: Appreciation


Author:
Leo Kerr
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 19:39:16 01/01/15 Thu

Wes, I meant to say something about this last week, but since today's another holiday, maybe it works today, too.

Seeing that you do perhaps all of this posting of your stories by hand, taking various amounts of time from your day and from your family (doing this on Christmas and New Year's Day,) well, some of us really appreciate what you do for us. Especially that the posting continues unbroken on the holidays.

Leo
Replies:
Subject: BFE


Author:
Boyd Percy
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 21:56:21 12/30/14 Tue

I like the names that Wes comes up with in his stories. Does Tomtucknee remind anyone else of Bum F**k Egypt like it does me?

Happy and healthy 2015.
Subject: The Last Place You Look posting starts


Author:
Wes
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 20:22:50 12/14/14 Sun

I just posted the first chapter of The Last Place You Look. There are 27 chapters.

RTF files, mobis, epubs, and PDFs are available from the Spearfish Lake Tales Store. Sales on Lulu for hardcopies and PDFs have also been enabled; Lulu epubs should be available soon and I will make an announcement here when they are. In the meantime, you can still get epubs from the Spearfish Lake Tales Store.

Preorders have been shipped. Very often when I put up a new story there are html bugs that don't show up when I tested it locally. I'll stay up until around midnight EST to deal with any of those issues that you bring to my attention. I'll also be available until then if you want to order a book.

There's a story that goes along with The Last Place You Look. Years ago I'd established the main character as being located in Florida, so when I got around to writing this book, out of sheer laziness I placed his home in the subdivision where a relative lives. Then, when the book hit the editing stages, I discovered that Bob, one of my editors, lives about a mile from there. Bob was nice enough to send me pages of local color that added a lot to the vibrancy of the book. While there are still some totally fictional locations, this book is placed much better in the real world than normal. Thanks, Bob!

Have fun reading The Last Place You Look!


-- Wes
Replies:
Subject: Photo Post of 12-24-2014


Author:
Boyd Percy
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 22:03:14 12/23/14 Tue

On the Photo Post of December 24th, the ubiquitous water bottle strikes again.

Merry Christmas, Happy Hanukkah, Seasons Greetings, Happy Holidays to all of you.
Replies:
Subject: Blanch Tickle Girl on BTFH


Author:
Allen
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 20:29:49 12/23/14 Tue

Hey Wes

Just a heads up your Wednesday post, which should have been Ch3 is in fact a repeat of Ch2 posted on Tuesday.

FYI

Allen
Replies:
Subject: Lulu epub glitch fixed


Author:
Wes
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 19:06:51 12/17/14 Wed

Epubs of The Last Place You Look are now available from the Spearfish Lake Tales Store. Sorry about the delay.

-- Wes
Subject: newsletters v newspapers


Author:
Leo Kerr
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 21:04:51 12/16/14 Tue

something in Chapter 2 of "Last Place You Looked" started me wondering: with Emily taking over the Bradford Courier, and/or her experiences with it, does being a professional newspaper person affect how she handles the 1988 newsletter?

Or, perhaps, after a year or so, how has Emily's perspectives and such altered the Courier?

(I'm hoping I'm using the right name for the Bradford paper..!)

Leo
Subject: Another win for Jon and Tanisha


Author:
Jim Wickman
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 22:12:24 12/10/14 Wed

Jon and Tanisha can take several bows.The Navy has come up with a weapon to match theirs.

http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2014/12/us-navy-approves-first-laser-weapon-for-operation-aboard-persian-gulf-ship/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+arstechnica%2Findex+%28Ars+Technica+-+All+content%29
Replies:
Subject: Bird in the Hand


Author:
Dang Fool
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 14:15:13 10/22/14 Wed

I immediately enjoyed Bird in the Hand and over time my opinion has firmed into the belief that it is my favorite story from Wes.

Part of my enjoyment comes from the multiple characters. I have nothing against stories like Blanche Tickle that concentrate on a couple, but I was delighted to have the story weave between characters and have them tied together in unexpected ways. While there's joy in having known characters reappear, like seeing Emily and Kevin in Bullring Days, I was especially tickled to watch a minor character like Ashley Kielhorn add her voice to the story.

If asked before this, I would have answered "Next Generation" as my favorite, but now I'm re-evaluating. I'm trying to objectively measure how much of TNG's appeal was from being my first.

Well, it's a good excuse to re-read all the stories, eh?

Who else has an opinion?
Replies:
Subject: Shades of Dawnwalker


Author:
Skip
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 20:45:42 12/12/14 Fri

After the recent storms, local tv had a peice showing people surfing on Lake Tahoe. Where are Crystal and Randy etal?
Subject: Unusual Weather in Grand Canyon


Author:
Andrew Haworth
[ Edit | View ]

Date Posted: 18:55:04 12/12/14 Fri

Video of cloud inversion at the grand canyon from AP.

http://video.ap.org/Raw-Rare-Clouds-in-Grand-Canyon--28255250?playlistId=10212
Replies:
Main index ] [ Archives: 1[2]345678910 ]
[ Contact Forum Admin ]


Forum timezone: GMT-5
VF Version: 3.00b, ConfDB:
Before posting please read our privacy policy.
VoyForums(tm) is a Free Service from Voyager Info-Systems.
Copyright © 1998-2016 Voyager Info-Systems. All Rights Reserved.